Boulder County - Press Releaseshttp://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/?z=1Boulder County Press ReleasesApplications available for Phase 2 of the Private Property Flood Debris Clean-Up ProgramBoulder County, Colo. – All unincorporated Boulder County residential properties with debris remaining from the 2013 Flood are eligible to apply for the Flood Debris Cleanup (FDC) program. Commercial properties are also eligible, though residential properties will be given a higher prioritization in the selection process. Property owners who received direct financial assistance from FEMA or any other Federal funding source specifically for debris removal are not eligible for the FDC program.

Boulder County unincorporated property owners should complete the FDC application at http://bit.ly/BoCoDNEG for their property to be considered for the program. Owner-occupied residential properties will be granted priority in the selection process. 

In 2014, Boulder County received $1.9 million from the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) to create temporary jobs and assist with the flood recovery process. The Disaster National Emergency Grant (DNEG) program funds short-term labor positions for Boulder County residents who will provide flood debris removal assistance to private property owners. 

Once properties are selected, FDC work crews will arrive on-site with small hand tools, wheelbarrows, chain saws, and in some cases, mid-sized machinery including loaders and excavators. Applicants should provide detailed debris information in their application so that FDC staff may come prepared with the appropriate tools and equipment. FDC staff work between the hours of 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. The clean-up program is anticipated to end in the fall of 2015.

For more information contact Mark Wesson, at 720-564-2725 or mwesson@bouldercounty.org or visit www.BoulderCountyFlood.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4373Thu, 26 Mar 2015 10:00:00
County Commissioners approve financing mechanism to address cash flow issues associated with flood recovery projectsThe county will proceed with the issuance of Certificates of Participation in the amount of approximately $45 million in response to the 2013 Flood

 

Boulder, Colo. – The Boulder County Commissioners have approved the sale of Certificates of Participation* (COPs) in the amount of approximately $45 million to be repaid over ten years, with an option to “call” (or repay in full) the COPs after five years. The exact amount of the proceeds will be finalized when the sale closes on or about March 31.

 

The financing is designed to address cash flow issues the county is facing with reimbursements from state and federal sources lagging well behind the pace of local flood recovery work in response to the 2013 Flood.

 

“We believe using this financing mechanism is the best way to ensure that we can continue with our flood recovery efforts in an efficient and timely manner,” said Board of County Commissioners Chair, Deb Gardner. “After months of modeling our cash flow situation and looking at the best ways to ensure we can get our roads and bridges back in order so that people can travel throughout our county and return to their homes permanently, we think this is our best option.”

 

In their remarks at the business meeting where the sale was approved, the county commissioners acknowledged the generosity of voters and taxpayers in Boulder County for helping to fill the county’s $45 million gap in recovery costs (after expected reimbursements) by passing the Flood Recovery Tax in 2014. The new sales and use tax went into effect in 2015 in the amount of 18.5 cents on a hundred dollar purchase for five years. The commissioners have specified that money from the COPs sale will be used to help pay for the county’s share of (unreimbursed) costs for necessary flood reconstruction projects remaining as a result of the 2013 Flood.

 

The Flood Recovery Tax is expected to generate approximately $9 million per year in revenue over the next five years (for a total of $45 million). That entire amount of money has been deemed critical in helping the county complete its flood repair projects which are expected to cost $217 million in total.

 

The timing of receiving flood tax revenues in yearly increments, however, could hamper the county’s ability to make the most efficient use of that money overall. For example, some residents who still do not have safe access to their homes are waiting on final road projects to be completed before they can build their driveways or bridges to connect their homes to county roads.

 

By “up fronting” the revenues expected from the flood recovery tax through the use of COPs, the money will be available to the county more quickly and be put to use sooner.

 

“I agree with my colleagues in issuing these Certificates of Participation, and am confident that pursuing financing in this manner will help us to achieve faster recovery more efficiently by helping us avoid some inflation costs associated with long-term construction work and allowing us to achieve greater economies of scale by bundling projects together and getting them completed sooner,” said Board of County Commissioners Vice-Chair, Elise Jones. “Without the COPs financing we’d be unable to complete the necessary flood recovery projects within the timeline we believe our residents expect and deserve.”

 

Boulder County Administrative Services Director Jana Petersen who oversees the county’s financial services division closed by adding, “We are especially pleased to learn that the county has received a very strong AA/Stable rating from Standard and Poor’s for this sale, which we anticipate will return a highly favorable interest rate for the county as a result of this action.”

 

For more information about Boulder County’s flood recovery efforts, visit www.BoulderCountyFlood.org.

 

-BoulderCounty.org-

  

*Certificates of Participation, or COPs, are a common financing tool available to local governments. Local governments designate specific properties as security for financing and lease or sell those properties to a Trustee. These properties are then leased back by the Trustee to the government under a lease purchase agreement. Investors purchase undivided interests in the right to receive rental payments and are paid principal and interest on set maturity dates. Once the COPs are paid off in full, the properties are transferred back to the local government, or the leases are canceled and considered paid in full. 

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4371Tue, 24 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Deadline to apply for summer jobs with Boulder County Youth Corps is March 27Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County residents ages 14-17 have until 4:30 p.m. on March 27 to apply for summer jobs with the Boulder County Youth Corps. Boulder County is also hiring adults to be leaders. Female applicants are especially encouraged to apply.

The Youth Corps will hire 155 teenagers to work 30 hours per week, Monday through Thursday, from June 15 to Aug. 5 on a variety of community service projects such as forest thinning, historic preservation, construction and repair of fencing, trail construction and maintenance, landscaping and removal of Russian olive trees and noxious weeds. Youth Corps teams will work in unincorporated Boulder County as well as in cities and towns within Boulder County.

Applicants can apply online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps. Applications can also be picked up at counseling offices in Boulder Valley and St. Vrain Valley schools; city and town personnel offices; most local recreation and youth centers and libraries; and the Boulder County Human Resources Department, 2025 14th St., Boulder.  

This year, Corps members will earn a starting wage of $8.23/hour, with the possibility of earning a $100 bonus at the end of the program based on merit and strong attendance. Teens who have worked for the Corps in past years can earn up to $8.73/hour. In addition, Corps members are eligible for reimbursement for the purchase of work boots and gloves and RTD bus passes.  

The Youth Corps offers one of the best first job opportunities available in Boulder County. Teams have completed projects such as building one mile of new trail at Ruth Roberts Open Space which connected Broomfield to Boulder County regional trails, building a 100 square foot floating wetland to help reduce pollutants and algae and provide additional wildlife habitat in a City of Louisville fishing pond, and installing an irrigation system at a Boulder County low-income housing site in the City of Lafayette. 

The Youth Corps is also hiring leaders to supervise the youth. Team leaders must be high school graduates at least 21 years old with two years of college coursework or more. A list of full qualifications is available online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps. Team leaders start at $14/hour. These positions remain open until filled.

For more information, visit www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps or call the Youth Corps office at 303-678-6104.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4368Wed, 18 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County responds to USFS' draft decision on Eldora's expansion plansBoulder County's response to Record of Decision and final Environmental Impact Statement on Eldora Mountain Resort's ski area expansion plans released on March 17, 2015, by the U.S. Forest Service:
 
 
Boulder County staff have not had the time to adequately review the draft Record of Decision and final Environmental Impact Statement released today by the U.S. Forest Service which allows Eldora Mountain Resort to move forward and expand its terrain and facilities on National Forest System lands. However, upon quick review of the draft, we are disappointed that the decision does not address the major concerns Boulder County raised last year in regards to the lack of public process and our stated environmental concerns.
 

Our comments submitted in 2014 specifically called for greater protections of the area’s natural elements and wildlife habitat, and outlined potential negative transportation outcomes and impacts to critical viewsheds and the water resources of Middle Boulder Creek. Staff will review the full set of documents and report our findings to the County Commissioners before any potential further action is taken by the county in response to the USFS’s decision.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4367Tue, 17 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Dynamic Project Visibility General Training to be Held March 26 Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Area Agency on Aging is hosting a Project Visibility general training on March 26, in Longmont. This free workshop is designed to educate professional service care providers, community members, and friends and family members about the particular needs and strengths of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders.

What: Project Visibility training to develop compassionate care for LGBT elders
When: Thursday, March 26
Time: 9:45 a.m. registration and coffee; 10a.m.-Noon Part I; 1-3 p.m. Part II
Where: Prairie Rooms, Boulder County Parks and Open Space, 5201 St. Vrain Road, Longmont 
Cost: Free
RSVP: Register by March 24 by emailing lmccormick@bouldercounty.org or calling 303-441-4518

Project Visibility is an award winning training program developed in 2004 by Boulder County Area Agency on Aging, after they conducted extensive focus groups with area LGBT older adults. These seniors wondered which service providers were “safe and friendly” and feared many could be unwelcoming, even hostile. 

Participants will view a short award-winning film that brings awareness and a face to the issues of aging as an LGBT person. Courageous elders speak about their lives, their strengths, wishes, and concerns about the aging services network. Each participant receives a manual with history, background information, terminology, resources, and practical suggestions for providing culturally-competent care and service. The goal is to create a community in which we all age well. In addition, attendees qualify for a listing in the upcoming Silver Lining, a resource directory for LGBT elders in Boulder County.

Despite rapid rights advances, LGBT older adults still worry about feeling forced back into “the closet” in order to receive compassionate care or facing a wall of assumptions about who they are and who they love. 

Trainer Leslie McCormick highlights the need with this anecdote, “Just two weeks ago, I was approached by a gay elder who asked me, ‘Where can I go in Boulder County to be accepted for who I am and treated appropriately?’ I told him that our Silver Lining Directory is a good place to start: these are businesses and agencies who have invested in understanding and respecting the life experiences of LGBT older adults by taking the Project Visibility training.” 

McCormick particularly encourages providers who assume none of their senior clientele is lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender to take the free, Project Visibility training, “Due to historical prejudice, many LGBT older adults may not readily disclose these important dimensions of themselves. They may have been married. They may have children. They may have come out later in life. Assumptions that everyone is straight and/or cisgender has a lot to do with why LGBT older adults are five times less likely to access senior services, are more isolated, and have higher rates of depression and other health problems than their straight peers. 

“It’s important to understand differences in order to provide excellent care for all,” McCormick explains. “LGBT older adults lived in a time during which overt discrimination toward them was commonplace. Far fewer legal protections meant little recourse when their housing, jobs, and basic safety were threatened. Respectful care for LGBT elders involves an appreciation for the strengths and needs that accompany such history.” 

Project Visibility continues to evolve through the addition of a second level of training and an online training course due out this spring. The training’s ten years of community outreach and education has raised awareness and built basic cultural competency about working and living with people who are part of this often invisible population. Now, more trainees want specific skills and tools for creating welcoming environment, anticipating the questions and concerns of LGBT older adults, and intervening when discrimination or hostility occurs. That’s what the two-level training provides. 

For more information and to register, contact Leslie McCormick, Project Visibility trainer, at 303-441-4518 or lmccormick@bouldercounty.org. The deadline to register is noon on Tuesday, March 24.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4364Thu, 12 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Partners for a Clean Environment (PACE) expands into one-stop-shop for business sustainability Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County and the City of Boulder are re-launching the Partners for a Clean Environment (PACE) program as the one-stop-shop for business sustainability in Boulder County.

PACE provides expert advising services, financial incentives and certification for businesses’ energy efficiency, waste reduction, water conservation and transportation efforts. PACE Business Sustainability Advisors work one-on-one with businesses and provide expert, customized assistance to help them reach their sustainability goals and gain recognition for their accomplishments. PACE services are provided at no cost to businesses throughout all Boulder County communities.

“PACE has been able to help us meet our sustainability goals,” said Justin Gold of Justin’s, a local producer of nut butters and nutrition. “Our Business Sustainability Advisor has assisted us every step of the way by answering questions, providing guidance and training, and making sure we take advantage of all available incentives. We really feel like we have a partner to meet our mission.”

As part of its work with PACE, Justin’s implemented a compost program at its new location and is currently working toward earning a PACE certification in zero waste. 

In addition to reinvigorating this program, the City of Boulder and Boulder County recently made available $450,000 in rebates for commercial building and operation improvements. Funding is available through PACE on a first come, first served basis.

“As one of the county’s longest-standing business sustainability programs, PACE has partnered with thousands of businesses and contractors to achieve significant economic and environmental gains that will continue to benefit all Boulder County communities moving forward,” said Boulder County Commissioner Cindy Domenico.

“The City of Boulder is excited to see this valuable program expand to provide businesses with expert counsel on a variety of sustainability goals,” said Boulder Mayor Matt Appelbaum. “We greatly value our businesses as a vital part of our community and appreciate their willingness to partner with us on these important initiatives. We hope PACE makes it easy and convenient for them to do so.”

To learn more and get started, please contact a PACE Business Sustainability Advisor, at 303-786-7223 or info@PACEpartners.com, or visit www.PACEpartners.com

Learn more about PACE’s work with Justin’s and other local businesses through PACE’s short video series at https://vimeo.com/channels/PACE

About PACE
PACE began in 1993 as a partnership of local governments and businesses committed to creating a business community with environmentally sustainable practices. Since then, PACE has continued to evolve and do even more to help businesses meet their sustainability goals and gain recognition for their achievements. More than 3,500 businesses have worked with PACE, and more than 300 of these businesses have earned PACE certification in energy, waste, water and/or transportation. 

EnergySmart, which began in 2011, is the energy service area of PACE. EnergySmart also offers energy efficiency services to homes throughout all Boulder County communities.

PACE is funded by Boulder County and the cities of Boulder and Longmont. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4362Tue, 10 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Northern Front Range Recreational Sport Shooting Management Partnership Schedules Virtual Meeting April 13Boulder County, Colo. – The Northern Front Range Recreational Sport Shooting Management Partnership (NFRRSSMP) has scheduled a Virtual Meeting for April 13, 6-8 p.m. The Partnership is comprised of representatives from Larimer, Boulder, Gilpin and Clear Creek counties as well as the U.S. Forest Service and Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Anyone with an interest in the Partnership’s Strategy for moving forward is encouraged to participate in the April 13 meeting.

The goal of the Virtual Meeting is to gauge if the Partnership is moving in the right direction and if there are other components the NFRRSSMP should be considering or other comments with regard to our future plans. This meeting will be limited to a discussion of the Partnership’s Strategy and will not discuss specifics to do with closures, noise, litter etc. For site-specific shooting conflict concerns please contact local law enforcement or the U.S. Forest Service.

The Partnership Strategy has three components:
  1. Each county (Larimer, Boulder, Gilpin and Clear Creek) will identify potential designated shooting areas. 
  2. The Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests will begin an analysis on how to provide safe, sustainable Recreational Sport Shooting opportunities while providing for the health and safety of recreationists and residents.
  3. The Partnership will provide information and education for safe and responsible shooting.

What is a “Virtual Meeting?”
The goal of the Virtual Meeting is to provide a way for as many people to share their thoughts and questions about the NFRRSSMP Strategy (see above) as possible. On April 13 from 6-8 p.m. the Partnership will be live webstreaming the meeting in which all of the Partner agencies will answer pre-submitted questions and comments. 

Webstreaming the meeting allows a large number of people to view the meeting without having to travel to attend the meeting in person. This also allows us to archive the video for anyone to view at a later date. 

How can you participate in the Virtual Meeting?
We are asking anyone interested in the recreational sport shooting issue in Larimer, Boulder, Clear Creek and Gilpin counties to watch short videos about the NFRRSSMP and read the Strategy prior to commenting. Comments submitted should only be about the Strategy. After reviewing the information, interested parties are asked to submit questions, comments, concerns or other thoughts about the Strategy before April 13 in one of the following ways:
Sport Shooting Partners
Attn: Garry Sanfacon
P.O. Box 471
Boulder, CO 80306

The comments submitted will be compiled before the April 13 meeting and posed to the Partners at the meeting for their response and discussion. This facilitated manner will allow for the most comments to be addressed as possible and will allow the meeting to remain on topic. 

A few “live” comments will be taken during the Virtual Meeting and can be submitted via email, Facebook or Twitter between 6 and 8 p.m. These select comments will be asked directly to the Partners.

All comments must be received by one of the methods listed above; in-person comments will not be taken at this time.

As the Partnership continues to address safe recreational sport shooting, we hope people will continue to give us feedback and input on the process, and as always, we strongly urge you to report any unsafe shooting activities to your local law enforcement agency and the U.S. Forest Service. 

Those interested can learn more about the Partnership, follow up on meeting details, sign up for emails,  and connect via social media at www.SportShootingPartners.org, or contacting the Project Coordinator, Garry Sanfaçon, at info@sportshoortingpartners.com or by calling 720-564-2642. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4360Fri, 06 Mar 2015 10:00:00
County seeking mentors to help change the lives of juvenilesBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is looking for volunteers willing to dedicate their time on a weekly basis to help local teens achieve positive life changes. 

The Boulder County Community Services Mentor Program is seeking adults who can work well with teens (involved with county services) to be a positive role model and commit to mentoring weekly. Volunteer time essentially consists of activities enjoyed by participants, whether it is going to a ballgame, watching a movie or just grabbing a bite to eat.

The Mentor Program matches adults and juveniles one-on-one in order to provide youths with enduring links to positive supports in the community. Adult role models provide the teens with a unique support relationship that can promote the development of positive assets and reduce the likelihood of recidivism. Mentors also provide individual attention that separates teens from the potential influences of higher-risk peers. 

Volunteers are required to complete training and commit to mentor a teen for one year.. Mentors will meet with their teens once a week for 2-3 hours according to a flexible schedule that meets their needs and the schedule of their mentees. Mentors can plan activities that meet their interests; current mentoring pairs have participated in activities such as pottery painting, horseback riding, dance classes and movies.

All prospective mentors must pass a criminal background check. The deadline for applications is March 31. For application information and additional details, contact the Justice System Volunteer Program at 303-441-4890 or abrubacher@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4359Thu, 05 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County preserves in perpetuity 73-acre certified organic farm near Longmont Boulder County, Colo. - David Asbury, a local organic farmer and long-time tenant on the property, has purchased the privately-owned 73-acre Hoffman Farm property. Concurrently, Boulder County, with help from a grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Farm and Ranchland Protection Program (FRPP), purchased a conservation easement from David Asbury that removed all the development rights from the property and insures that the property will remain agricultural in perpetuity.

Protection of this organic farmland north of Longmont was a cooperative effort that included Boulder County, the NRCS FRPP, David Asbury, and the approval of the City of Longmont. Because the property was within the city of Longmont’s municipal influence area (Longmont Planning Area Comprehensive Development Plan Intergovernmental Agreement, 1997) and in a prime location for development, approval was required from the city of Longmont.

To acquire the conservation easement, the NRCS FRPP gave Boulder County a grant for $1,588,713. Boulder County paid the remaining $1,341,107 (total conservation easement value $2,929,820). Dave Asbury paid $509,005 to acquire ownership in the property subject to the conservation easement and with the development rights removed. 

This kind of transaction, a conservation easement on privately owned agricultural land, is a wonderful example of how prime agricultural land can be protected and still remain economically viable for local organic farmers.

Other recent land conveyances that aided organic farming in Boulder County include: 

  • Red Wagon Organic Farm: In 2010, Boulder County sold a 1.5-acre lot with a house to Amy Tisdale and Wyatt Barnes of Red Wagon Organic Farms to serve as the farmstead for the adjoining 31 acres that is leased as an organic market farm.  An additional 39 acres has been added to the lease.
  • Cherry Creek Tree Farm: In 2013, Boulder County sold 17.66 acres of the Cherry Creek Tree Farm at US 287 and Isabel Road to Jason and Natalie Condon for an organic farm and agreed to lease the adjoining 55.21 acres to the Condons – that farm will be certified organic this year.  
The county currently owns and manages 25,000 acres of agricultural land, 16,000 of which is active cropland. Twelve percent of these 16,000 acres is certified organic or in transition to becoming organic. In the 2012 Boulder County Cropland Policy, the county set a goal of reaching 20% certified organic county-owned cropland by the year 2020. 

“Boulder County is dedicated to supporting organic farmers who cultivate county-owned agricultural lands,” said Commissioner Elise Jones. “Organic farming can help improve the health of our farmlands, the local food supply, and the environment as a whole. Our county has a strong market for organic production and we are confident we will be able to meet or exceed our goal of 20 percent of county-owned cropland being farmed organically by the year 2020.”

In addition to acquisitions, Boulder County helps encourage and support organic farming through a number of activities and incentives. Boulder County offers several incentives to organic producers:
  • Lease bid preference with a realistic organic management plan
  • 50% rent reduction for the first five years
  • Organic certification cost assistance
  • Cost sharing for an organic crop/marketing consultant
  • Infrastructure improvements such as irrigation, fencing, buildings, etc.
  • Organic Weed Team on county staff available to help with weeds in ditches, fence lines, etc.
For more information on organic farming on Boulder County agricultural lands, please go to www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org/organic, or contact David Bell, Agricultural Resources Manager, at dbell@bouldercounty.org or 303-678-6234. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4358Thu, 05 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Statement Regarding COGCC Floodplain RulesA statement from the Boulder County Board of County Commissioners:


The Boulder County Commissioners are deeply disappointed that the Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) has failed to ensure that oil and gas facilities be kept out of vulnerable floodplain areas throughout Colorado.

At the COGCC rule making hearing yesterday, Kim Sanchez with the Boulder County Land Use Department, and Varda Blum, Boulder County Floodplain Manager, testified for Boulder County on these two main points:

1)  No oil and gas development should be located in the floodway;*

2)  There needs to be recognition of local authority of oil and gas activity in the floodplain.

*Floodways are areas where water moves faster and deeper so any obstruction can increase flood levels elsewhere and also become a hazard if dislodged or disrupted by the swiftly moving water.

As a general planning principle, Boulder County attempts to locate development outside of the floodplain whenever possible. When it comes to the floodway, we have tried to eliminate any hazardous development, particularly as we've looked at practices for rebuilding more safely and resiliently after the flood.  

We believe the same logic should be applied in the context of oil and gas which involves the on-site use and storage of hazardous and toxic substances that have the potential to do great harm to public health when spilled into water systems. Boulder County has thus recommended that oil and gas development be prohibited in the most hazardous portions of the floodplain, the floodways.  

Although the new mitigation measures in the floodplain rule adopted by the COGCC yesterday address some of the lessons learned from the 2013 Flood, Boulder County believes that COGCC missed an opportunity to fully implement recommendations from the "Lessons Learned in the Front Range Flood of September 2013" report which specifically noted the value of locating oil and gas facilities "as far away from waterways as possible."

We appreciate that the COGCC considered the lessons learned as part of their discussions yesterday, but there seemed to be a lack of understanding about the basic floodplain regulatory program as part of the proceedings.

In summary, we had hoped the COGCC would put into action what we consider to be the most important lessons learned from the 2013 Flood instead of delaying those critical points for possible future rulemaking.


-Boulder County Commissioners
 Cindy Domenico, Deb Gardner & Elise Jones


Attachment: Boulder County Commissioners submit comments to COGCC Floodplain Rulemaking

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4355Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Job & Career Fair for Teens & Young Adults Scheduled for March 12Boulder County, Colo. – Workforce Boulder County is hosting the 10th Annual Job & Career Fair for Teens & Young Adults on March 12 from 3-6 p.m. at the Boulder County Fairgrounds. This is a free event for job seekers and employers. 

This is a great opportunity for anyone 14-21 years old to search for employment and explore careers and volunteer opportunities. During the event, participants are able to participate in mock interviews, receive professional resume critiques, and apply for jobs. 

What: Job & Career Fair for Teens & Young Adults 14 – 21 years old
When: Thursday, March 12 from 3-6 p.m.
Where: Boulder County Fairgrounds 
   9595 Nelson Rd, Longmont
Questions: Contact Rachel Strobel at rstrobel@bouldercounty.org 

There will be more than 35 hiring employers representing more than 700 job openings in a variety of industries including: Agriculture, Arts & Entertainment, Forestry, Government, Health Care, Retail, Service, Recreation, and Restaurants.

In addition, there will be more than 40 career and resource booths so youth have the opportunity to talk to colleges and professionals in a variety of careers. 

Come Prepared:
  • Professional attire is recommended
  • Bring your updated resume
  • Apply for a job
  • Bring your Social Security number
  • Bring your desire to work!
 
For additional questions and information please contact Workforce Boulder County at 303-301-2900 in Boulder or 303-651-1510 in Longmont.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4354Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Scholarship Funds Available for Multicultural StudentsBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Community Action Programs (CAP) has scholarship monies to award to low-income students. Scholarships range from $500-$1,000 each and are made possible through proceeds from CAP’s Annual Multicultural Awards Banquet.

Applicants must meet the following criteria:
  • Minimum one-year residency in Boulder County
  • Currently attending university, community college or technical school as a full-time undergraduate or graduate student
  • Low- to moderate-income level
Preference is given to students actively involved in a student organization or the community. This is not a scholarship for students who will be graduating from high school this spring/summer.

This is a one-time scholarship; prior CAP multicultural scholarship recipients are not eligible to apply again.

Applications are available online, at www.BoulderCountyCAP.org.

Application deadline is April 17. Students of color are encouraged to apply. Online applications and any questions can be sent to Sheila Goetz, at sgoetz@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4352Mon, 02 Mar 2015 10:00:00
Local Public Health Preparing for Measles OutbreakBoulder County, CO – In response to the nationwide measles outbreak, Boulder County Public Health is preparing for the possibility of an outbreak in Boulder County. While local public health officials are hopeful nobody in the community becomes ill from the disease, the impact of an outbreak would be significant. There are currently no cases of measles in Boulder County.

“Before a person even knows they’re sick with measles they may have spread it to dozens of others,” said Carol Helwig, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease Program coordinator. “And if the person spends time in a school or university setting, the possibility of spreading the illness to others who are not vaccinated is exponential.”

Measles is highly contagious and spreads through the air very easily when someone with the disease coughs or sneezes. The measles virus can stay on surfaces for up to two hours. An outbreak within a school setting has the potential to disrupt the learning of many unvaccinated students and halt their participation in any sports or extra-curricular activities.

Anyone who has been exposed to a person with measles and cannot prove they’ve been vaccinated with the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine or have immunity from the disease will be required to stay at home and away from school or work for 21 days. Those who develop measles will be required to stay home for four days after the measles rash develops.

Exposed individuals include those who have been in close proximity to a person with confirmed measles or those who have been in a room (or in a room that shares heating, ventilation, and air conditioning [HVAC] system) where a person with measles has been.

To keep loved ones safe from the disease, public health officials recommend that residents:

  • Review their children’s immunization records with their health care provider. Every child over five years should have two doses of MMR vaccine; children between ages one and five years should have one dose of MMR vaccine.
  • Make sure all adults in the home are also up-to-date on their measles vaccination. People vaccinated before 1989 may need to get an additional vaccine and should check with their health care provider.
  • Stay home, and keep children home, if they’re sick.

Children younger than one year of age and people who have compromised immune systems are not able to receive the MMR vaccine. Because measles virus spreads so easily, 95 percent of the community must be vaccinated in order to protect those who cannot be vaccinated.

“The fewer people that are vaccinated, the more likely it is that we’ll have an outbreak in Boulder County of measles or any other disease that can be prevented with vaccination,” said Helwig. “We understand that some parents may feel concerned about vaccinations, but the truth is we must protect those in our community who cannot protect themselves.”

Measles symptoms generally begin with a high fever (usually 103˚-105˚ F); runny nose; cough; and red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis). Later a blotchy rash will appear, starting at the hairline and spreading down the body. In serious cases, measles can cause pneumonia, brain damage, deafness, and even death.

For more information about measles, visit www.cdc.gov/measles. For more information about where to get immunizations, go to www.BoulderCountyShots.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4350Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County will operate on a regular schedule, Thursday, Feb. 26The Boulder County Emergency and Snow Closure Information line is 303-441-3800.

Please also follow us on Twitter @bouldercounty and Facebook for updates. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4349Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:00:00
A statement from the BOCC regarding Oil & Gas Task Force recommendations

A statement from the Boulder County Board of County Commissioners:


The Boulder County Commissioners thank the members of the Oil & Gas Task Force for their extensive time commitment and service spent working to address the issues associated with oil and gas development in Colorado. 


Today, the Task Force voted to send nine recommendations forward to Governor Hickenlooper, including suggestions ranging from increasing the number of oil and gas inspectors and funding a human health risk assessment, to improving use of the local government designee process and undertaking a state rule making on the siting of large oil and gas facilities. 


We acknowledge and appreciate these measures as modest but positive steps forward. Unfortunately, however, no recommendations were adopted that would provide any increase in local control over oil and gas development occurring within city and county borders or provide more balance between state and local oversight over this land use. 


As such, while well-intentioned, this process has failed to provide a meaningful solution to the ongoing controversies and conflicts being experienced as increasingly intensive levels of oil and gas development take place near homes and schools in communities across the state. We are disappointed that local governments are not being provided with the tools and authority we need to assure the health, safety and welfare of our residents.


Boulder County Commissioners
Cindy Domenico, Deb Gardner & Elise Jones
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4347Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County seeking participants for People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL) Boulder County, Colo. - In an effort to increase the number of people of color and lower-income residents on boards and commissions, Boulder County Community Action Programs has developed People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL): a training program educating individuals from Boulder County’s diverse communities about the inner-workings of boards and commissions. Participants learn about leadership development, communication styles, budgeting, fundraising and more. 

Diverse residents interested in civic engagement across Boulder County are invited to register for the PERL training program. This ten-week session will focus on connecting our communities with non-profit organizations and commissions ready to embrace inclusion.  

What: PERL Spring 2015 Training Program 
When: Wednesdays, beginning March 18 - May 20
Where: Sundquist Building, Baltic Room, 3482 N. Broadway, Boulder
Cost:  Free
RSVP: Contact Susana Lopez-Baker to register at 303-441-3956

People Engaged in Raising Leaders was created out of inclusiveness work The Community Foundation was doing with non-profit organizations. Results from one of their surveys spoke to the need for more people of color and lower income populations to be on Boards and Commissions. 

Currently, numbers of diverse populations interested in participating on boards and commissions are low. The PERL program aims to change this statistic to allow more board positions to be filled. Through increased outreach, training efforts, and collaborations, the PERL program will help fill a niche that truly represents the diversity in Boulder County.

To register or receive more information, contact Susana Lopez-Baker, at slopez-baker@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-3956.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4346Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Sheriff's Office Seeks Volunteer Victim AdvocatesBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is seeking volunteers to serve as victim advocates to provide assistance to victims of crime, accidents, trauma and other critical events.

Deadline to apply is March 23, training begins March 31

Working as a victim advocate offers the opportunity to touch the lives of others by providing a valuable source of support and information to those who have had their lives altered by traumatic events.

Sheriff Joe Pelle said, “Our Victim Advocates provide direct and follow-up support to the victims of crime and tragedy in our communities. This is a much needed, much appreciated service. The opportunity for personal reward and growth for the advocate is rich as well. Please consider joining us. We need people with a caring heart and who are willing to listen to and support victims and their families.”  

If accepted into the training program, advocates attend 40 hours of training in crisis intervention, grief response, victimology, legal procedures, law enforcement and resource information. Ideal volunteers are 21 years old, or older, calm, compassionate, emotionally mature and non-judgmental.

No prior experience is necessary as trainings will be provided. They will be held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and on Saturdays from March 31 through April 18. The deadline to apply is Monday, March 23.

“It’s the most gratifying thing I’ve ever done.”  Jay, current advocate

For more details about the program, a volunteer description or an application, please visit www.bouldercounty.org/safety/victim/pages/vicprogram.aspxor contact Cecil O’Farrell at cofarrell@bouldercounty.orgor 303-441-3656.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4344Fri, 20 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Public Hearing Scheduled for Feb. 26 to Consider Adoption of Watershed Master PlansBoulder County, Colo. – On Feb. 26 at 2 p.m. the Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to review the watershed master plans for Fourmile Creek, Left Hand Creek, Little Thompson River, St. Vrain Creek, and Upper Coal Creek. After a staff presentation and public comment, the commissioners will consider adoption of the master plans.

What: Public Hearing
When: Thursday, Feb. 26 from 2-3:30 p.m.
Where: Boulder County Courthouse 3rd Floor Hearing Room, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

In December 2014, Boulder County completed watershed master plans for St. Vrain Creek, Left Hand Creek, and Fourmile Creek. Boulder County also participated in the development of watershed master plans for the Little Thompson River and Upper Coal Creek, as these drainage areas include lands located in unincorporated Boulder County. All five plans continue the recovery process from the  2013 Flood by identifying stream restoration, flood mitigation, and other long-term watershed recovery and resiliency measures.

The staff presentation to the commissioners will:
  • Summarize the five watershed master plans; 
  • Review feedback received from the Boulder County Planning Commission and the Boulder County Parks and Open Space Advisory Board at their January 2015 meetings; and 
  • Discuss plan implementation. 
The commissioners will decide whether Boulder County will formally adopt these plans as stand-alone documents to use as a guide in seeking funding, designating county resources, and reviewing land use applications and permit requests.

“Residents are encouraged to attend the public hearing to provide feedback on the process and what they envision for future use of the master plans,” said Julie McKay, Boulder County Creek Planning Manager.

The completed plans, which are largely unfunded, can be used to seek funding to continue recovery from the 2013 Flood. Projects recommended in the master plans can be completed by individual property owners, groups of neighbors, non-governmental organizations, government agencies, or as cooperative efforts, which is why local communities, residents, and others interested in watershed recovery were heavily engaged in the development of the plans.

On Jan. 12 there was an information session with the commissioners to present the master plans. The presentation from the information session, as well as the master plan documents, can be accessed through the Creek Planning & Recovery web page at www.BoulderCountyCreekPlan.org.

For more information about the watershed master plans, please contact Stacey Proctor, 303-441-1107 or sproctor@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4343Fri, 20 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Commissioner Elise Jones Elected DRCOG Vice Chair Contact: Nate Currey, Communications Coordinator, DRCOG, 303 480-6743


BOULDER COUNTY COMMISSIONER ELISE JONES ELECTED
DRCOG VICE CHAIR

Feb. 19, 2015 (Denver, Colorado) – Boulder County Commissioner Elise Jones was elected vice chair of the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Board of Directors at the Board’s Feb. 18 meeting.

Joining Jones in leading the regional council in 2015 are Lone Tree Mayor Pro Tem Jackie Millet as chair, Aurora Council Member Bob Roth as secretary, and Westminster Mayor Herb Atchison as treasurer. Bennett Mayor Sue Horn is immediate past chair.

Jones has represented Boulder County on the DRCOG Board of Directors since January 2013. She previously served as secretary, and was appointed vice chair by the Board in August 2014 to complete an unexpired term of office.

# # #

The Denver Regional Council of Governments is a nonprofit collaborative association governed by a Board of Directors representing county and municipal governments. Board members work together to make life better in the Denver region for people of all ages, incomes and abilities. Through Metro Vision, the plan to manage growth over the next 25 years, the region’s local governments work cooperatively to address development, land use, transportation, environmental quality and older adult issues.

PDF of News Release

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4342Thu, 19 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Open house on permanent repairs to Wagonwheel Gap Road and flood recovery programsPublic feedback on plans will be collected

Boulder County and its engineering consultant will provide information and collect feedback regarding preliminary designs of permanent repairs to Wagonwheel Gap Road at an open house from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., on Tuesday, Feb. 24, at the Pine Brook Hills Community Center, 1905 Linden Dr., Boulder. In addition, Boulder County flood recovery staff will be available to answer questions regarding flood recovery programs including potential funding sources for private projects. All are welcome at the open house. 

After the meeting, public input will be incorporated into the roadway design, if applicable. Another public meeting will likely be held this summer or early fall to provide another opportunity for the public to see and comment on refined engineering plans prior to construction, which is anticipated to begin in early 2016.  

Members of the public do not need to attend the meeting to submit input. Meeting materials, including the preliminary plans, are available on the project website. For those unable to attend, the county encourages them to comment by:
All public comments should be received no later than Wednesday, March 11 in order to guarantee their consideration for this phase of design. 

For more information on the project, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, via email or call 303-441-1032. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4340Thu, 19 Feb 2015 10:00:00
2015 Colorado County Clerks Association Scholarship Application InformationNote:  This announcement has been shared with the public school districts that overlap Boulder County.


Scholarship available to graduating senior – apply today!


The Colorado County Clerks Association will grant 4 regional one-time awards in the amount of $1,000 to seniors graduating from Colorado high schools to further their education at any university, college, junior college or technical institution.


Selection will be based on the following:
• Completed application
• 3.25 GPA Minimum
• Community involvement with and interest in government, business or political science
• Financial need/hardship


Financial aid awarded by the association will be remitted to the institution of attendance and will be credited to the student's account. The scholarship monies are to be used for tuition, books, and room and board expenses.


Each district will select a finalist and forward their selection to the Executive Board by April 24, 2015. Members of the Executive Board of the County Clerk's Association will finalize the scholarship awards by May 1, 2015. The scholarships will be awarded at graduation.


The local Boulder County student deadline to apply is Monday, March 16, 2015. Please download the application here.
 
Questions? Please contact Mircalla Wozniak at mwozniak@bouldercounty.org or 303.413.7766.
 
Good luck to our local students!

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4339Wed, 25 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Residents invited to participate in a hands-on agriculture event Feb. 25Boulder County, Colo. – Parks and Open Space will host “From Our Lands to Your Hands” Family Farm FAIR at the Boulder County Fairgrounds in Longmont on Feb. 25. The goal of this event is to help educate the community about the importance of agriculture and conservation in their daily lives. It is a hands-on opportunity for people to become better connected with local farmers and ranchers who help put the food on their tables, conserve the land for future generations and wildlife, and provide the base for many products we use daily.  

What:  Our Lands to Your Hands, Family Farm FAIR
When:  Wednesday, Feb. 25, 5-8 p.m.
Where: Boulder County Fairgrounds, Exhibit Building, 9595 Nelson Rd, Longmont
Cost: Free and no RSVP is needed
Details: Participants can sit in eight large tractors during the event

Local farmers and ranchers along with others involved in the agriculture industry will share their passion and knowledge of where our food comes from and how it is grown. With only 2 percent of Americans responsible for raising the food we eat today, it is only natural that the mainstream population is far removed from agriculture and the important role it plays in our daily lives. This is a great event that works to bridge the gap and promotes local agriculture and tells the story of farm-to-plate.  

There will also be a special presentation, “Furrow Focus- A New Way of Looking at Precision Agriculture,” at 7 p.m. by Chad Pfitzer of 4Rivers Equipment in Greeley. He will discuss the new technologies that are helping farmers improve efficiency and become even better stewards of the land.

No matter where your day leads or how it ends, it all starts with a farmer or a rancher. This is not just the food you eat; it is the clothes you wear, open land views, and many of the products we use on a daily basis that are derived from agriculture. However a recent nationwide survey shows that 72 percent of consumers know nothing or very little about farming or ranching. Residents are invited to learn more about agriculture in our community from local farmers and ranchers who grow vegetables, corn, sugar beets, wheat, barley, raise livestock and so much more. 

This event is hosted by Natural Resource Conservation Service, Boulder Valley and Longmont Conservation Districts, CSU Extension Boulder County, Farm Service Agency, Boulder County Parks and Open Space and Farmers Alliance for Integrated Resources (FAIR). 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4337Wed, 18 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County Youth Corps Member Receives Award at State CapitolBoulder County, Colo. – The Colorado Youth Corps Association (CYCA) honored its 2014 Corpsmembers of the Year this morning at the annual Youth Corps Awards Ceremony. Preston FitzRandolph with the Boulder County Youth Corps served as one of the youth speakers and was recognized at the Colorado State Capitol, alongside nine other young people, for his outstanding contributions to corps’ work on conservation projects last year. The event was followed by a celebratory brunch at the Warwick Hotel.

Preston, an 18-year-old City of Boulder resident who just completed his fourth season with Boulder County Youth Corps, earned his Corpsmember of the Year award through exemplary initiative and leadership. He consistently led groups of corpsmembers to complete tasks such as mulching trees, weeding open space and trail repair. 

As a four-year veteran of the corps, he would knowingly pair himself with less-motivated teammates to teach them a good work ethic. Preston was always the first to volunteer, even for undesirable tasks, and listened to everyone’s ideas on the team, both fellow corpsmembers and leaders.

 “There is no way that I could have learned this much about myself through any other outdoor work experience. It has been a blast working with such great people while improving the community in Boulder,” Preston recounts. “My experience with youth corps was not about the pay but instead about the people, teamwork and experiences that I knew would help me in my future. This program is all about building connections with people, learning skills, and most importantly preparing you for your future.”

The young people involved in youth corps are a critical source of support in conserving and protecting our state’s land, water and energy resources, and contribute significantly to making Colorado a better place to live and play. 

“The exceptional work of corpsmembers is a testament to the commitment of today’s young people to serve our state while preparing for their own futures,” said Scott Segerstrom, CYCA’s executive director. 

The 10 youth who were honored as 2014 Corpsmembers of the Year are:
  • Preston FitzRandolph of Boulder County Youth Corps
  • Forest Utzman-Nichols of Larimer County Conservation Corps
  • Tyler Lee of Mile High Youth Corps-Southern Front Range
  • Jorge Lomas of Mile High Youth Corps
  • Gracie Billingsley of Rocky Mountain Youth Corps
  • Dan Salerno of Southwest Conservation Corps-Four Corners
  • JP Clark of Southwest Conservation Corps-Los Valles
  • Ben Anderson of Steamboat Springs Community Youth Corps
  • David Woodbury of Western Colorado Conservation Corps
  • Kalen Myers of Weld County Youth Conservation Corps

About Boulder County Youth Corps
The Boulder County Youth Corps provides opportunities for Boulder County teens to develop a sense of community involvement through personal accomplishment, teamwork and service to the county. Celebrating 20 years of service this summer, the BCYC will employ almost 200 people to improve public trails, lands and facilities. Visit www.BoulderCounty.org/youthcorps or call 303-678-6104 for more information on current opportunities. 

About Colorado Youth Corps Association
The Colorado Youth Corps Association (CYCA) is a statewide coalition of ten accredited youth conservation corps that engages and trains youth, young adults, and military veterans on land, water and energy conservation projects. Youth corps is a proven strategy for engaging young people in service to their communities and stewardship of their environment while cultivating valuable skills to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Learn more about the association at www.CYCA.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4326Mon, 02 Feb 2015 10:00:00
Irrigation ditch, Agricultural and Forestry wood pile burning under wayBoulder County, Colo. - The department will conduct irrigation ditch, agriculture and forestry wood pile burns on county open space lands this spring.

 

Agricultural and irrigation ditch burns will occur between now and the end of the year as conditions allow. Pile burns will occur between now and April when there is enough snow cover.

 

Agricultural ditch burning is an historic practice in Boulder County. It is an inexpensive, efficient and relatively fast “low-tech” method to target long sections of ditch and remove accumulated debris that can interfere with the flow of water. The primary advantage of burning ditches is that much of this material is consumed on-site. Ditch burning can occur throughout the county on ditches with county ownership.

 

Boulder County open space properties scheduled for ditch or agriculture burns this year include:

  • Pella Crossing
  • Josephine Roche Open Space
  • Kenosha Ponds
  • A.H.I. property
  • Wambsganss
  • Big Gaynor Lake
  • Dodd 
  • Birchfield
  • Gage
  • Jim Henry
  • Lutz
  • Mumford
  • Table Mountain

 

Boulder County open space properties scheduled for wood pile burning include:

  • Hall Ranch
  • Heil Valley Ranch

 

These controlled burns are contingent on ideal weather conditions, including relative humidity, fuel moisture and wind. The department will work cooperatively with the Boulder County Sheriff's Department on each controlled burn following the Boulder County Guide to Prescribed Fire Planning and Operations. 

 

Smoke and flames may be visible for up to 72 hours. There may be heavy smoke in the air. Please do not call 911 since a controlled burn is not an emergency. Boulder County Parks and Open Space employees will monitor the burned areas to ensure fires are completely out. 

 

For additional information, contact Senior Forester Stefan Reinold at 303-678-6202 or sreinold@bouldercounty.org.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2507Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Lyons Housing Collaborative Kicks Off Community Visioning Process Jan. 31Boulder County, Colo. – The first public meeting on a proposed Lyons housing recovery project will be held Saturday, Jan. 31 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. at Rogers Hall in Lyons. As part of an effort to ensure the development reflects the character and values of the town, the Lyons Housing Collaborative is seeking input around the community’s vision for the project during an Open House and Visioning Workshop. 

On Tuesday, Jan. 20, following recommendations by a selection committee, Town of Lyons Trustees named a team to spearhead an effort to replace housing lost in the 2013 Flood. The newly formed Lyons Housing Collaborative includes Trestle Strategy Group, Workshop 8, Habitat for Humanity, and the Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA). All team members of the Housing Collaborative were hand selected to bring a strong local connection to Lyons and extensive experience in designing, building, and managing sustainable affordable housing for the long term.

“We are committed to a thoughtful, engaged, and collaborative process to rebuild our community,” said Lyons Mayor John O’Brien. “The Boulder County Housing Authority has been a tremendous supporter of ours both before and after the floods, and we’re happy to have them lead this effort.”

More than 100 Lyons households were uprooted following the devastating September 2013 flooding, and many have not been able to return. The Town of Lyons is proposing the development of between 50 and 70 replacement housing units. After an extensive process, the Town selected five to seven acres within the 25 acre Bohn Park area, just southeast of downtown Lyons and in the area where much of the housing was lost in the floods. The property was identified as the most viable location after several months of analysis and study of over two dozen potential locations.

If Lyons’ voters approve the use of the land for the project, the Lyons Housing Collaborative would utilize federal, state, and local funding to construct an affordable housing community that would be available for medium- and low-income residents in Lyons. The Lyons Housing Collaborative will be exploring several strategies to ensure the new housing is available for Lyons’ residents who were displaced by the 2013 Flood, as well as seniors, area workers, artists and musicians.

“Our commitment is to the Lyons community,” said BCHA Director Frank Alexander. “The town has been through a very tough time, and we see this recovery housing community as an opportunity to help preserve Lyons’ unique and inclusive character while providing a key support for residents to get back on their feet.”

This Saturday’s Lyons Housing Recovery Design Open House will be the first in a series of activities to capture the community’s vision for this project. Topics of discussion will include ways to celebrate this special site within Lyons and ensure the new housing reflects the character and values of the town. The Lyons Housing Collaborative will also be seeking design input on architectural styles and onsite amenities, and how the site connects with existing neighborhoods and downtown.  

Over the next three to six months, the Lyons Housing Collaborative team is committed to robust and inclusive community engagement.  The team has planned multiple opportunities to participate in the process, including weekly “Bohn Park Walkabouts”, multiple weekly drop in Storefront hours at 443 Main Street in Lyons, affordable housing site tours, focus groups, design charrettes, and other formal and informal activities to participate, ask questions and provide feedback. There will also be opportunities to interact with the work in progress through a collaborative design space at the project team’s Storefront.  Information about these events is available at www.townoflyons.com/housing-recovery.

BCHA owns and manages three affordable housing sites in Lyons. Within the past three years, BCHA has successfully developed two affordable housing sites in Lafayette: Josephine Commons (senior housing) and Aspinwall (middle- and low-income affordable rental housing). These communities have many amenities including a commercial kitchen with a senior meals program, a common house with a community center and classroom space, communal green space, a playground, a community garden, and connections to open space and trails. Late in 2015, BCHA will begin development of a Louisville affordable housing community which will include space for a non-profit artist collaborative and housing for artists, seniors, and families.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4325Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Applications for teens and adults to apply for summer jobs with Youth Corps now availableBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County residents ages 14-17 can now apply for summer jobs with the Boulder County Youth Corps. Boulder County is also hiring adults to be team leaders. Boulder County is especially in need of female Corps members and leaders.

The deadline to submit youth applications is Friday, March 27. Other positions are open until filled.

The Youth Corps will hire 160 teenagers to work 30 hours per week, Monday through Thursday, from June 15 to August 5 on a variety of community service projects. Team leaders will be employed from June 3 to August 7 to work up to 40 hours per week, Monday through Friday. Projects will include such activities as forest thinning, historic preservation, construction and repair of fencing, trail construction and maintenance, landscaping and removal of Russian olive trees and noxious weeds. Youth Corps teams will work in unincorporated Boulder County as well as in cities and towns within Boulder County.

Applicants can apply online at www.BoulderCounty.org/youthcorps. Applications can also be picked up at counseling offices in Boulder Valley and St. Vrain Valley schools; city and town personnel offices; most local recreation and youth centers and libraries; and the Boulder County Human Resources Department, 2025 14th St., Boulder. 

This year, Corps members will earn a starting wage of $8.23/hour, with the possibility of earning a $100 bonus at the end of the program based on merit and strong attendance. Teens who have worked for the Corps in past years can earn up to $8.73/hour. In addition, Corps members are eligible for reimbursement for the purchase of work boots and gloves and RTD bus passes. 

Team leaders must be high school graduates at least 21 years old with two years of college coursework or more, and assistant team leaders must be high school graduates at least 18 years old, among other qualifications. A list of full qualifications is available online. Team leaders start at $14/hour and assistant team leaders at $12/hour. 

The Youth Corps offers one of the best first-job opportunities available in Boulder County. Teams have completed projects such as building one mile of new trail at Ruth Roberts Open Space which connected Broomfield to Boulder County regional trails, building a 100 square foot floating wetland to help reduce pollutants and algae and provide additional wildlife habitat in a City of Louisville fishing pond, and installing an irrigation system at a Boulder County low-income housing site in the City of Lafayette.  

For more information, visit www.BoulderCounty.org/youthcorps or call the Youth Corps office at 303-678-6104. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4323Tue, 27 Jan 2015 10:00:00
“Project Visibility” Training - Thursday, Jan. 29 Community members and elder caregivers invited to participate in training on Thursday, Jan. 29

"Project Visibility”training will focus on developing compassionate care for LGBT elders

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Area Agency on Aging is hosting a Project Visibility general training on Thursday, Jan.29, in Boulder. This free workshop is designed to educate professional service care providers, community members, and friends and family members about the particular strengths and needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders.

What:      Project Visibility Training to Develop Compassionate Care for LGBT Elders

When:     Thursday, January 29

Time:       8:45am registration and coffee; 10:00 – 3:00 p.m. training

Where:    Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1st Floor, Houston Room,

                 1750 33rd St. Boulder, 80301

Cost:        Free of Charge (but registration requested)

Participants will view a short award-winning film that brings awareness and a face to the issues of aging as an LGBT person. Courageous elders will then speak about their lives, their strengths, wishes, and concerns about the aging services network. Each participant receives a manual with history, background information, terminology, resources, and practical suggestions for providing culturally-competent care and service. The goal is to create a community in which we all age well. In addition, attendees qualify for a listing in the upcoming Silver Lining, a resource directory for LGBT elders in Boulder County. There will be ample time for discussion.

Trainer Leslie McCormick will explain why it is important that Project Visibility, through the addition of a second level of training and an online training course due out this spring, continues to evolve: “The new, two-part training is designed to even more effectively meet the needs of trainees. Project Visibility’s ten years of community outreach and education has raised awareness and built cultural competency about working and living with people who are part of this often invisible population. Now it is time to raise the bar.”

 

Both levels of training actively engage learners in exploring material that engenders rich and mutually rewarding relationships between LGBT elders and family members, professionals, and other community members.

 

McCormick further explains that many Boulder County learners demonstrate readiness to move from basic competencies to developing a more sophisticated capacity to create true and broader inclusion. LGBT elders are five times less likely to access senior services because they are concerned with the level of sensitivity and awareness of staff at facilities and agencies. Additionally, caregivers and agency/business administrators will benefit from understanding how recent changes in legal protections for LGBT people relate to the daily realities of LGBT older adults, which now represent at least two different generations of LGBT individuals and their respective needs, experiences, concerns, strengths, and expectations.

“It’s important to understand differences in order to provide excellent care for all,” McCormick explains. “LGBT older adults lived in a time during which overt discrimination toward them was commonplace. Far fewer legal protections meant little recourse when their housing, jobs, and basic safety were threatened. Respectful care for LGBT elders involves an appreciation for the strengths and needs that accompany such history.”

For more information and to register, contact Leslie McCormick, Project Visibility trainer, at 303-441-3583 or lmccormick@bouldercounty.org.


Project Visibility is an award-winning training program developed in 2004 by Boulder County Area Agency on Aging after conducting extensive focus groups with area LGBT elders. These seniors wondered which service providers were “safe and friendly,” and feared many could be unwelcoming, even hostile. In the ten years Project Visibility has been providing training in Boulder County, service providers and residents have become increasingly more aware of the presence of LGBT older adults among us; however, financial and health disparities among LGBT older adults - as compared to their non-LGBT peers - suggests the need for system changes.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4322Mon, 26 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Training Programs for Family Caregivers Begin in FebruaryBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Area Agency on Aging, a Division of Community Services, offers two training programs beginning in February for family caregivers of older adults, one focused on the hands-on skills of caregiving and the other on caregiver self-care.   

National Caregiver Training Program is a 21-hour course (meets once a week for 3 hours) that helps family caregivers acquire the skills needed to provide safe, confident home care for older loved ones.  Classes, taught by a registered nurse, provide detailed instruction, demonstration, and hands-on practice. Topics include caring for someone on bedrest, providing personal care, using a wheelchair safely, managing medications, taking vital signs, controlling infection, preventing falls, reducing caregiver stress, using local resources, and more.  Each caregiver receives Quick Tips for Caregivers, a home reference guide.  
Wednesdays, Feb. 18 – April 1, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m., in Longmont
Powerful Tools for Caregivers is a 15-hour course (meets once a week for 2½ hours) that gives family caregivers the tools to deal with the emotional challenges of caregiving.  Classes, taught by trained leaders, help caregivers learn to reduce stress, improve self-confidence, communicate their feelings, balance their lives, increase their ability to make tough decisions, and locate helpful resources.  Each caregiver receives The Caregiver Helpbook:  Powerful Tools for Caregivers. 
Tuesdays, Feb. 24 – March 31, 1:30 – 4 p.m., in Boulder
The courses are open to Boulder County residents providing local or long-distance care for a relative, partner or friend who is 60 or over, or of any age if the person has dementia. There is no charge, but donations are appreciated. Financial assistance for respite care (substitute elder care) during class periods is available.  
Pre-registration is required. To register, or for more information, please call 303-678-6116 or email infocaregiver@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4319Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:00:00
2015 Watershed Summit convenes water experts to discuss local water issuesBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County water experts will be gathering to participate in a robust discussion about local water issues at the 2015 Watershed Summit. Panel discussions will highlight a range of local and state water issues to promote collaborative solutions for managing one of Boulder County’s most complex and critical natural resources.

What: Watershed Summit
When: Wednesday, Jan. 21, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Where: Plaza Event Center, 1900 Ken Pratt Blvd., Longmont

The 2015 Watershed Summit brings together water professionals, water users, and local leaders to discuss a variety of issues, including water storage; water conservation; the State Water Plan; droughts, floods, and climate change; watershed planning; in-stream flows; sustainability; and local agriculture.

Following the 2015 Watershed Summit, attendees are invited to participate in a networking event from 4:30 to 8 p.m. in the Left Hand Brewery Tap Room, located at 1265 Boston Ave. in Longmont. The evening event will include a short talk from award-wining Colorado author, photographer and filmmaker Jonathan Waterman about his journey paddling along the Colorado River. 

The first 175 people who register for the 2015 Watershed Summit will receive a free, locally sourced lunch, along with a free wood-fired pizza and non-alcoholic beverage for dinner.

The 2015 Watershed Summit, presented by the Boulder County Consortium of Cities, is part of a multijurisdictional collaboration to identify gaps, strategies, and innovative solutions related to local water issues. The consortium’s 2013 Water Stewardship Task Force Final Report recommended an annual watershed summit to support continued community discussions about water.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4318Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Public Meeting Jan. 29 to Review Heil Valley Ranch Prescribed BurnBoulder County, Colo. – Staff from Boulder County Parks and Open Space and the Sheriff’s Office Wildland Fire Management Program are hosting an After Action Review to discuss the outcome of the recent prescribed burn at Heil Valley Ranch. 

What: Heil Valley Ranch Prescribed Burn After-Action Review Meeting
When: Thursday, Jan. 29, 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Where: Boulder County Parks and Open Space, 5201 St. Vrain Road, Longmont

In October and November 2014, Boulder County conducted a prescribed fire at Heil Valley Ranch. The 150-acre project was completed in early November after five days of ignitions. 

Members of the public are invited to join the fire command staff for a presentation and question-and-answer session. This meeting is open to public comment, as well as input from fire personnel involved in the burn.

For more information, please contact Erin Hartnett, at 303-678-6211 or ehartnett@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4317Fri, 16 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Creating Connections Diversity Training scheduled for Jan. 28Boulder County, Colo. – This training will focus on recruiting and retaining people of color to serve on local non-profit boards. The training will review demographics, awareness, recruitment techniques, and retention strategies.

What: Diversity Training for:  Executive Directors and Current Board Members
When: Wednesday, Jan. 28, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 
Where: Longmont Community Foundation, 636 Coffman Street, Suite 203, Longmont  
Cost: Free
RSVP: Call 303-441-3956 or email slopez-baker@bouldercounty.org

Community Action Programs held multiple focus groups between January and March of 2013 to identify gaps in the availability of cultural competency training in Boulder and gauge the effectiveness of current trainings. The focus groups also hoped to determine potential creative strategies to improve outreach and recruitment of local, hard-to-reach board and commission members.

Several themes were identified during the focus groups including:
Training is needed for people on boards, commissions, businesses; “everybody” 
Outreach is difficult and so is meaningful diversity and inclusion training

The result of these conversations is a newly constructed training for Creating Connections! CAP Staff has been working on designing diversity trainings for boards and commissions in Boulder County and our first training is Jan. 28.

 For more information, contact Susana Lopez-Baker at 303-441-3956 or slopez-baker@bouldercounty.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4315Thu, 15 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Applications for LEAP winter heat funding now acceptedBoulder County, Colo. – As cold temperatures continue across Colorado, help is available for Boulder County residents who struggle to pay their winter heating bills. LEAP, the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, is accepting applications now through April 30.

LEAP assists low-income residents with covering the costs of heating their homes. The program is designed to pay the highest benefit to households with the highest heating costs. Income criteria apply, including a limit of 150 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), which equates to a gross annual income of $17,508 for a family of one or $35,784 for a family of four. Other eligibility factors apply, and residents are encouraged to contact the LEAP office for more information. 

“Heating costs can take a big bite out of our wintertime budgets,” said Theresa Kullen, LEAP Manager for the Boulder County Department of Housing and Human Services (BCDHHS). “Even if you’re not sure you’re eligible, let us check for you. This assistance can help make sure you’ve got enough money left for groceries for the rest of the month.”

In addition, BCDHHS continues to oversee a local expansion of the Heating Assistance Program and can provide help for households with a higher income limit than the LEAP Program. This expansion has gross monthly income limits of 185 percent of FPL, which is $21,600 for a family of one or $44,124 for a family of four.  

“Our neighbors deserve to be able to stay warm in the winter and not have to make big cuts to spending on other essentials,” said BCDHHS Director Frank Alexander. “This is just one of the many kinds of help we can offer, but it’s an important one.” 

For more details or to obtain an application, residents should contact the State of Colorado LEAP Information Line at 866-HEAT-HELP (866-432-8435). The Boulder County LEAP office is located at 1921 Corporate Center Circle, Suite 3-F, in Longmont, and can be reached at 303-678-6097.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4314Thu, 15 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County elected officials sworn in at ReorganizationGardner named Chair of Board of Commissioners

 

Boulder, Colo. – Several newly-elected and re-elected officials were sworn into service to Boulder County Government as part of the county’s annual Reorganization meeting Tuesday morning in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room.

 

20th Judicial District Chief Judge Maria Berkenkotter presided over the swearing in ceremony for:


  • Assessor Jerry Roberts*
  • Commissioner Cindy Domenico*
  • Coroner Emma Hall*
  • Sheriff Joe Pelle*
  • Surveyor Lee Stadele

*Re-elected to a new 4-year term in 2014.

Note: Newly-elected Treasurer Paul Weissmann was sworn in on Jan. 2, as required by state law, and Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall* will be sworn in at a separate event later this month.


Following the ceremony, the commissioners held their annual Reorganization meeting, during which Commissioner Deb Gardner was named Chair of the three-person Board of County Commissioners. Commissioner Elise Jones was elected to fill the role of Vice-Chair.

 

“I just want to say how proud I am to be part of this organization,” said Commissioner Gardner upon assuming the role of chair. “It’s been a true privilege and honor to serve this county and be part of this cohesive Board of Commissioners. I look forward to tackling together the many interesting and challenging opportunities that lie ahead in 2015.”

 

As part of the County Reorganization, the County Commissioners gave their annual State of the County address, highlighting the accomplishments of 2014 and looking forward to the challenges and opportunities in 2015. They also presided over annual administrative matters, including the appointment of department heads and staff members who serve at the pleasure of the board, and the deputizing of employees.

 

The webcast archive of the swearing in ceremony and reorganization meeting will be available on the county’s website by the end of today at: 

http://www.bouldercounty.org/gov/meetings/pages/hearings.aspx.

 

-BoulderCounty.org-

  

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4312Tue, 13 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Boulder County awards funding for zero waste programs Boulder County, Colo. – The Board of County Commissioners awarded $50,000 to eight waste-reduction programs as part of the Resource Conservation Division’s zero waste funding programs for 2015. 

Zero Waste Funding initiatives provide an opportunity for businesses, organizations and individuals within the community to contribute to Boulder County’s long-term vision of moving toward Zero Waste. This vision is outlined in Boulder County’s Zero Waste Action Plan

Boulder County is encouraging the development of programs with an emphasis on demonstrated resource diversion (new tons diverted from disposal) for businesses, residents and governmental buildings.  

This funding, established in 1997, has awarded a total of more than $989,000 to more than 191 entities representing the whole of Boulder County and Broomfield. This year’s awards should push the 24-year total over one million dollars awarded to nearly 200 recipients.

The Resource Conservation Advisory Board has recommended funding for the following programs in 2015:  
  • $9,960 for the City of Lafayette to launch a bilingual compost opportunity educational program in seven neighborhoods.
  • $2,352 for the City of Lafayette to purchase additional zero waste stations. 
  • $5,179 for the Town of Lyons to purchase zero waste stations for municipal buildings.  
  • $10,000 for the City of Louisville to engage in a zero waste education program targeted at individuals who use larger garbage containers. 
  • $10,000 for the Boulder County Resource Conservation Division to purchase equipment for community compost drop off and infrastructure at the Nederland Transfer Station.
  • $2,104 recommended for the Town of Lyons to provide incentives for zero waste volunteers at community events. 
  • $4,600 for an educational program to be conducted by Bands for Lands (supported by Sustainable Revolution) to offer an “Xtreme” Zero Waste event in Longmont for Earth Day. 
  • $5,805 for the Town of Ward to provide support and documentation for monthly recycling collection services and a one-time hard-to-recycle collection event.  
For more information about the zero waste funding or any other zero waste activities in Boulder County, visit www.BoulderCounty.org and search for Zero Waste, or call Darla Arians at 720-564-2223.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4309Fri, 09 Jan 2015 10:00:00
Flu Outbreaks Hit Boulder CountyBoulder County, CO – As of January 8, seven Boulder County long-term care facilities have reported outbreaks of influenza. In total, 82 Boulder County residents have been hospitalized as a result of influenza, a two-fold increase in hospitalizations from this time last season. This is the highest number of flu hospitalizations in 7 years, when the county first began tracking the data. Most residents who have been hospitalized are 65 years of age and older; 1 child has been hospitalized.

“The flu vaccine does offer protection and is still recommended, especially for those who spend time with others who cannot get the vaccine or who have other chronic medical conditions,” said Indira Gujral, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease and Emergency Management division manager.

Those at higher risk from influenza include children younger than 5 years (especially those younger than 2 years); adults 65 years and older; pregnant women; and people with certain chronic health conditions, such as asthma, diabetes, heart or lung disease, and kidney disease.

“The flu can be life-threatening for some, so getting vaccinated and taking precautionary steps to help protect those around us can make all the difference,” said Gujral.

In addition to flu shots, public health officials recommend taking everyday prevention steps to reduce the spread of illness:

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone, except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to prevent infecting them.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth since germs are spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. The virus can be spread to others beginning one day before symptoms develop and up to 5-7 days after becoming sick.

People at high risk should check with their health care professionals promptly if they develop flu-like symptoms. Flu antiviral drugs work best for treatment when started within the first 48 hours after symptoms appear.

In Boulder County and across the country, the H3N2 flu viruses continue to predominate, accounting for more than 95 percent of all influenza reported. In the past, H3N2-predominant seasons have been associated with more severe illness and higher mortality, especially in older people and young children, when compared to H1N1- or B-predominant seasons.

For more information about flu and this year’s flu activity, visit www.cdc.gov/flu. To find a clinic to get a flu vaccination, visit www.BoudlerCountyFlu.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4308Fri, 09 Jan 2015 10:00:00
New Boulder County Sales & Use Tax Rate for 2015The county’s tax rate will increase from 0.80% to 0.985% in 2015


Boulder County, Colo. – With the addition of County Ballot Issue 1A – the Flood Recovery Tax – which was approved by voters in November, the county portion of sales and use taxes collected in Boulder County will increase to 0.985% for 2015.

A breakdown of sales taxes in Boulder County is available online at: www.bouldercounty.org/gov/budget/pages/salesusetax.aspx

 

The county has also published a brochure to explain sales and use tax collections in Boulder County. Please note: Cities and other localities have additional sales taxes which are added to the total sales tax rate in Boulder County for purchases made within municipal districts.

 

County taxes are collected by the State of Colorado. All payments of County tax should be reported and remitted directly to the Colorado Department of Revenue on its form. Forms are available on the State of Colorado web site: www.colorado.gov/revenue.

 

-BoulderCounty.org-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4302Mon, 22 Dec 2014 10:00:00
East County Line Road flood recovery repairs completeRoadway now open to all travelers

Boulder County’s Transportation Department officially reopened East County Line Road between CO Hwy 119 and Quicksilver Road at 8 a.m., Monday, Dec. 15.  Additional

 work will take place in the area, but the road will remain open and delays will be minimal, if necessary. This section of roadway has been closed since September 2013 when the bridge over St. Vrain Creek and several hundred feet of nearby roadway were washed out by the flood event. The East County Line Road project is one of the first major permanent flood recovery projects to be finished by the county. See attached files for before and after photos of the area. 

“I’d like to thank everyone in Boulder County and especially those people who frequently use this section of road for their patience and understanding while we worked to design and rebuild East County Line Road,” said George Gerstle, Boulder County transportation director. “Another flood event in this area is not a matter of if, but when, which is why we incorporated what we observed from the 2013 flood into the design of the new bridge. This road and bridge reflects where the river naturally goes during a flood and will therefore be more resilient to future events.”

The reconstruction project consisted of the creation of a new 270-foot bridge that spans the St. Vrain Creek basin, repaving of the roadway on the north and south side of the bridge, new drainage ditches and culverts, streambank stabilization, and realignment of private and public utilities in the area. The four month project cost approximately $4 million to complete and is eligible for federal reimbursement. Work was completed by Lawrence Construction and their various subcontractors.

For more information on the work, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032.

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com. 


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4295Mon, 15 Dec 2014 10:00:00
Clerk Hall Informs Candidates, Jurisdictions 2014 Election Results are FinalBoulder County, Colo. Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall notified the coordinating entities who participated in the Boulder County election that the results for the 2014 General Election are final and has issued certificates of election to all county candidates who received a majority vote.

 

To finalize the election, as stated by law, the Boulder County Clerk prepared and made available to the public a statement of the total number of votes cast in the election for each candidate and for and against each ballot issue.

 

Last week, Clerk Hall received word that the Secretary of State’s office accepted the official statewide abstract of votes cast for state races and issues. “I had hoped the Secretary’s decision would have persuaded our canvass board to certify the local results, but that has not happened,” stated Clerk Hall. “We still hope that they will go ahead and do so, but, in the meantime, we had to move forward. Four canvass board members will not be allowed to hold the will of the Boulder County voters hostage.”

 

Although some have raised questions about the effect of the canvass board’s prior decision not to certify, Clerk Hall says the election results stand. “The canvass board’s decision not to certify the county’s abstract of votes cast does not nullify the election of county candidates or decisions on county and local ballot issues,” remarked Hall. “If that were the case, it would mean that four partisan members appointed by parties whose candidates received only a small percentage of the votes in Boulder County could override the will of 144,405 voters.”

 

Because the margin of victory was so large in all of the races and ballot issues involved, no recount was triggered or requested. At this point, challenges to the election of candidates to office or the result of a ballot issue election are allowed only in narrow circumstances, such as fraud or corruption that could change the result of the election. These types of issues could only be decided by a judge – not the canvass board. Additionally, Boulder County’s election had no documented discrepancies in the audit or the reconciliation that impacted the outcome of any contest. As a result, the canvass board should have certified.

 

The final official election results are available at www.BoulderCountyVotes.org.

 

Additional Background Information:

Canvass board’s role in an election: The canvass board’s role is to reconcile the number of ballots counted to number of ballots cast and ensure that the number of ballots cast does not exceed the total amount of voters in the county. They are then requested to certify the official abstract of votes.

 

Composition of the canvass board: The canvass board is composed of two members from each of the “major” political parties plus the Clerk. In the 2010 gubernatorial race, candidate Tom Tancredo of the American Constitution Party received more than 10% of the vote statewide, the American Constitution Party (ACN) earned “major” party status until the next gubernatorial election, this year. Thus, even though the ACN Party only represents approximately 300 voters in Boulder County, they have had two party representatives (out of six) on the canvass board since 2010 (this will no longer be the case after this year as there was no ACN candidate that received 10% of the vote this fall). 

 

Appointment to the canvass board: Each county chair is responsible for appointing two members to the canvass board no later than 15 days prior to the election.

 

2014 Canvass Board Vote: This year, the canvass board signed off on the election audit, which tests the election’s vote tallying systems and processes to ensure accuracy, but in a 4-to-3 decision voted to not certify the election results. This was in spite the fact that there were no significant discrepancies in the audit or in the reconciliation reports.

 

Secretary of State Rule Change: After the Primary Election, there was a Secretary of State rule change during the August rule revision period. There was previously an election rule allowing a county clerk to certify local election results when the canvass board failed to certify. This provision was deleted. Nothing in Colorado law states that a canvass board’s decision not to certify the county’s abstract of votes nullifies the election of county candidates or decisions on county or local ballot issues.

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4293Wed, 10 Dec 2014 10:00:00
DMV System Upgrade Occurring Friday Night through TuesdayBoulder County A computer network system upgrade will be implemented by the Colorado Department of Revenue beginning on the evening of Friday, Nov. 7 and lasting through Tuesday, Nov. 11. During this time, business at the Clerk and Recorder’s office Division of Motor Vehicle will be conducted as usual on Monday, November 10, except for a few small changes (Note: County offices will be closed on Tuesday, November 11 for Veterans Day).

 

The upgrade will have the following impacts, which are minimal for most members of the public:

 

·         On Monday, November 10, state and county motor vehicle title and registration offices, including Boulder County, will not be able to print titles over the counter or pull motor vehicle records from the state database.

·         Customers who do title transactions during this server upgrade will have their titles mailed to them, which will take 4-6 weeks.

 

During this time, customers will still be able to renew their vehicles online at: www.colorado.gov/renewtags. Our office recommends that if you need a printed title immediately, that you either come in prior to the upgrade on Friday, November 7 or afterwards on Wednesday, November 12.

 

The server upgrade will enhance maintenance and support of the Colorado State Titling and Registration system, which means better performance for the citizens of Colorado.

 

The Division of Motor Vehicles apologizes for any inconvenience due to this important maintenance work. Please contact the Title and Registration Section with any questions at 303-205-5608.

 

 

BoulderCountyVotes.org –
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk - 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4270Fri, 07 Nov 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Clerk & Recorder to Conduct Election Wing Tour / Media Open House this WednesdayBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will conduct an in-depth Election Wing tour for interested media. Participants will be shown step-by-step what happens when a mail ballot is received and how it is securely processed. The tour will highlight key elements of our ballot processing system that protect the integrity of the voting process and election. Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett will be in attendance to discuss how potential cases of voter fraud are identified and why signing your ballot properly matters.

 

What:  Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Elections Wing Tour / Media Open House
 

When: Wednesday, October 22 – 12:30 – 2 p.m.

Who:  Hillary Hall, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder and Stan Garnett, Boulder County District Attorney

Where: 1750 33rd Street in Boulder – Attendees should check in at the Elections Office on the 2nd floor and will be escorted to the secure Elections Division Ballot Processing Wing. Please arrive promptly at 12:30 p.m.

The tour offers media the opportunity to see how ballots are processed, understand how issues of potential voter fraud are identified, learn about the role of official Election Watchers, and hear about how ballot resolution works among other ballot processing procedures and safeguards. Hall, along with Garnett, will be available to answer any questions after the tour. Participants will be able to observe workers processing ballots for the November General Election.

 

In order to accommodate everyone, please RSVP to MWozniak@BoulderCounty.org if you are planning to attend. Please include in your RSVP whether you plan on filming part or all of the tour.

 

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4249Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Voter Service & Polling Centers in Boulder CountyBoulder County, Colo.  All active registered voters in Colorado now automatically receive a ballot in the mail. Elections in Colorado are conducted by mail ballot with select Voter Service and Polling Center locations available for those who need additional assistance or would like to vote in person.

 

Ballots have now been mailed to all active registered voters to the address listed on their voter registration. Residents who have not received a ballot are encouraged to contact the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office at Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org or by calling 303-413-7740. Ballots can be returned either by mail or at a designated drop-off location anytime up to 7 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 4.

 

Beginning Monday, Oct. 20, six Voter Service and Polling Centers will be available to service Boulder County voter needs. Locations are:

·         Boulder: County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street

·         Boulder: CU Campus – Recreation Center on Stadium Drive west of Folsom Street

·         Boulder: Wonderland Lake Trailhead (Foothills Nature Center), 4201 N Broadway Street

·         Lafayette: County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1376 Miners Drive

·         Longmont: County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 529 Coffman Street

·         Longmont: Fire Station #5, 617 Barberry Drive (Airport & Nelson Road)

 

Hours of operation at the above locations are as follows:

·         8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 20 – Friday, Oct. 24

·         9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25

·         8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27 – Friday, Oct. 31

·         9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1

·         8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 3             

·         7 a.m. – 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4 (Election Day)

 

Boulder County voters can visit a Voter Service and Polling Center to:

·         Drop off a ballot

·         Cast a ballot in person

·         Request a replacement ballot

·         Register to vote or update voter registration information

·         Vote using equipment and facilities for persons with disabilities

 

In addition to the above locations, seven more Voter Service and Polling Center locations will be available on Monday, Nov. 3 and Tuesday, Nov. 4. Mail ballot packets include detailed information on all Voter Service and Polling Center locations as well as information on additional ballot drop-off locations – including Boulder County’s three new 24-hour drop box locations.

 

For new voters, or those who would like to update their information, voter registration for most residents can be done conveniently online at GoVoteColorado.com. This should be done no later than Monday, Oct. 27 in order to be issued a mail ballot. After Oct. 27, a person can register online and vote in the upcoming election, but will need to visit a Voter Service and Polling Center in person in order to request a ballot.

 

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content or find more information about the election. 

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4246Sat, 18 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Colorado Attorney General Drops Challenge to Marriage LicensesColorado Attorney General Drops Challenge to Marriage Licenses

Action signals validation of same-sex marriage licenses prior to October 6

 

Boulder CountyColorado Attorney General John Suthers asked a Boulder court to dismiss his challenges to the validity of same-sex marriage licenses issued by Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall. When the Tenth Circuit Court of appeals found Utah’s ban on same-sex marriages unconstitutional, Clerk Hall immediately began issuing same-sex marriage licenses. Suthers filed a lawsuit against Clerk Hall seeking to stop issuance of the licenses and asking the court to declare that the licenses already issued were void.

 

Yesterday, Suthers filed a motion in Boulder District Court asking the court to dismiss all of his claims against Clerk Hall. Despite his earlier arguments that the licenses were invalid, his request for dismissal includes claims regarding the validity of the previously issued licenses. Suthers states, “same-sex marriages are now recognized in Colorado . . . Accordingly, Plaintiffs’ claims against Clerk Hall are moot.”

 

Clerk Hall applauded Suther’s decision to drop the case. “All of the licenses I’ve issued to same-sex couples were valid when issued and they remain valid. Same-sex couples have been through enough already and they shouldn’t be required to take any additional action on their licenses.”

 

Suthers previously stated that same-sex couples married before October 6, 2014, should consider getting another license. However, “the Attorney General has now acknowledged that his authority does not extend to determining the validity of any couple’s marriage,” said Deputy County Attorney David Hughes.  

 

“We are incredibly pleased with Attorney General Suther’s dismissal,” stated Hall. “His action to dismiss should clear up any remaining doubts on the issue.”

 

Boulder District Court Judge Andrew Hartman is expected to rule on Suther’s motion to dismiss his claims against Clerk Hall within the next several weeks.

 

-  http://www.bouldercounty.org/dept/clerkrecorder -

-  On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4240Wed, 15 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Statement from the Boulder County Clerk and RecorderOn Friday afternoon, the Attorney General’s office sent us an email requesting that we “closely review the order” issued earlier in the day by the Supreme Court, in which the Court ordered both Adams County and Denver to refrain from issuing same-sex marriage licenses.  According to the letter, we were to let the AG’s office know of our intentions by noon on Monday (today).  We responded with the attached letter advising the AG’s office that we do not believe the order applies to us and that we intend to keep issuing licenses. 
 
As part of the case made to the Colorado Supreme Court, the AG asked the court to enforce a stay on all clerks.  In addition, five county clerks filed briefs in the case asking for clarity as to whether they should or should not be issuing same-sex marriage licenses.  Despite having the clear opportunity to, the Court’s order did not address clerks in any other county, including Boulder County. 
 
Today, the AG’s office appealed to the Colorado Court of Appeals Judge Hartman’s July 10th decision denying their motion for a preliminary injunction.  In addition, shortly after noon, the AG’s office filed an additional motion with Boulder district court, a “Forthwith Motion for Stay Pending Appeal.”  The AG’s office argues in this motion that the Colorado Supreme Court’s order applies to all counties.  We disagree for the reasons set out in the attached letter.  By its own very clear terms, the Court’s order addressed only Adams County and Denver. 
 
“As I have stated before, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals stated that marriage is a fundamental right.  I think the least harmful and most sensible solution is to issue marriage licenses and avoid the potential of more civil rights violations while this plays out in court.  And that is what we intend to do,” stated Boulder County Clerk and Recorder, Hillary Hall.
 
Letter to the Office of the Attorney General
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4143Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County 2014 Primary Unofficial Results AvailableBoulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division has finished tallying the majority of the ballots for the 2014 Primary Election. Unofficial election results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org. This will be the final number released until Monday, July 7. Election results will now undergo a preliminary audit process, Boulder County Canvass Board review, and final certification prior to the results becoming official. Final Primary Election results must be certified and submitted to the Secretary of State’s office by Monday, July 7.

As of approximately 3:30 a.m., the Elections Division finished tallying the preliminary results of 42,403 ballots. Eligible active voters affiliated with the American Constitution, Democratic and Republican parties participated in the Primary, as well as eligible active City of Longmont voters, in their Special Election. Out of the current 42,403 ballots casted, 4,134 are City of Longmont non-partisan ballots. In 2012, Boulder County saw 37,219 ballots cast in the Primary Election.

And while it is difficult to provide an exact comparison on voter turnout to previous primary elections because of changes in the law regarding active and inactive voters, it appears that voter participation in primary elections has risen.

“I am quite pleased with the turnout for the Primary Election this year,” stated Boulder County Clerk Hillary Hall. “We have seen a steady increase in participation since conducting our primary elections by mail. In 2006, our last polling place primary in a similar election year, we had half the number of ballots cast. Our new election model, where all voters are issued a mail ballot has worked great and increased participation, while leaving the decision of voting in person or by mail in the hands of the voter. I am excited to see how this fall’s General Election voter participation is under the new election model where all voters receive a mail ballot and can vote with greater flexibility and less stress.”  

The bulk of the outstanding ballots left to count are from military and overseas voters, provisional ballots, and any ballots where signature issues need to be cured. The Elections Division anticipates that the total amount of outstanding ballots to be less than 1100 ballots at this time.

Letters are being mailed to mail ballot voters who need to cure their signatures or provide a photocopy of their ID in order for their votes to be counted. Voters can check their information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify whether their signature or ID was accepted. The deadline for voters to provide their signature or photocopy of ID is 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 2.

In final reflection on this year’s Primary, Clerk Hall commented that, “everyone tends to focus on Election Day, but there is significant work that takes place year round in preparation for smooth elections. I’d like to commend the election staff and all the election temp workers who made this year’s election a success. While we are not done with our work, their outstanding commitment to a well-executed and transparent election process must be acknowledged.”

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4111Wed, 25 Jun 2014 10:00:00
Voter Service and Polling Centers open MondayLast day to register to vote online and still have a mail ballot sent to you
 
Boulder County – Elections in Colorado are conducted by mail ballot with select Voter Service and Polling Center locations available for those who require additional assistance or prefer to vote in person.
 
Beginning Monday, June 16, four Voter Service and Polling Centers will be available to service Boulder County voter needs between 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. (every day except Sunday, June 22) at the following locations:
 
All open locations as of June 16:
• Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street, Boulder
• Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 529 Coffman St., Longmont
• Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1376 Miners Drive, Lafayette
• Fire Station #5, 617 Barberry Drive, Longmont
 
Boulder County voters can visit a Voter Service and Polling Center to:
• Drop off a ballot
• Cast a ballot in person
• Request a replacement ballot
• Register to vote or update voter registration information
• Vote using equipment and facilities for persons with disabilities
 
In addition to the above locations, two more Voter Service and Polling Center locations will be available on Monday, June 23 and Tuesday, June 24 (Primary Election Day). Mail ballot packets included detailed information on all Voter Service and Polling Center locations as well as information on additional ballot drop-off locations. The information can also be found at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
Monday, June 16 is also the final day register to vote in the Primary and still have a mail ballot sent to you. After June 16, a person can register and vote in the upcoming election, but they will need to visit a Voter Service and Polling Center in order to request a ballot.
 
Voters who have not received a ballot or who have questions about their ballot can email the Clerk and Recorder’s office at vote@bouldercountyvotes.org, call 303-413-7740 or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center for more information.
 
Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4085Fri, 13 Jun 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County equipment testing completed for June 24 Primary ElectionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in the county’s upcoming Primary Election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test (LAT) held Tuesday.

Representatives from the local Democratic and Republican parties took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office and confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes.

The LAT also confirmed ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles were tested. In all, 1,729 ballots were tested, including 1,652 paper ballots and 77 electronic ballots on voting machines.

Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the Primary Election.

Results and test records are available for review at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:

  • Week of June 2: Ballots mailed out this week. Select Ballot Drop-off locations open. All voter services available at Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office in Boulder.               
  • Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you; voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day. Voter Service and Polling Centers open – see website for location and details.
  • Friday, June 20: All Ballot Drop-off locations open.
  • Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

BoulderCountyVotes.org –

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk - 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4069Fri, 30 May 2014 10:00:00
Primary Election less than a month awayBallots to arrive in homes week of June 2
 
Boulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division wants to remind voters that the Primary Election is less than a month away. Ballots to eligible Primary voters will be mailed starting June 2.
 
As with all elections now in Colorado, this election will be conducted entirely by mail ballot. The Boulder County Primary has been conducted by mail since 2010. New for this year’s Primary is that voters who prefer to vote in person may do so at any Voter Service and Polling Center instead of voting their mail ballot. Boulder County will have 6 Voter Service and Polling Centers open this Primary to service residents. Additionally, eligible residents can register up to and including Election Day and still vote in the current election.
 
The Elections Division will send ballots next week to eligible voters who are members of the Republican, Democratic and American Constitution parties. Additionally, the City of Longmont is conducting a Special Election. All City of Longmont voters will be receiving a ballot with the Longmont question regardless of party affiliation. In Boulder County, the total number of ballot recipients is 133,496 as of today and is expected to grow.
 
The mailed ballot packets include a detailed list of ballot drop-off points and service centers that will be open to the public prior to the Primary Election Day on Tuesday, June 24.
 
Unaffiliated voters may affiliate with a major party and vote in a primary up to and including Election Day. However, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office encourages voters to affiliate sooner, in order to ensure that you will receive your mail ballot in a timely fashion. Unaffiliated voters who change their registration after June 16 must request a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center (see BoulderCountyVotes.org for locations). Registration can be updated online at GoVoteColorado.com.
 
Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.
 
Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:
• Week of June 2: Ballots mailed
• Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you; voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day
• Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4061Wed, 28 May 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming electionBoulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming election
Logic and Accuracy Test to take place beginning May 27
 
Boulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division will conduct a logic and accuracy test beginning on Tuesday, May 27 on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2014 Primary Election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public.

What:     Logic and Accuracy Testing – Testing of ballots and equipment for upcoming election
When:    Begins 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 27; Testing typically takes a minimum of 1 work day.
               After the first day,  testing runs from 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. each day until complete.
Where:   Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street in Boulder
               Visitors will need to check in at the front desk of the Elections Office, Suite 200, to be escorted to the test area.
 
After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at www.BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
Boulder County voters can also visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
 
Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:
• Friday, May 23:  Deadline to change party affiliation from one party to another in order to participate in the Primary Election
• Week of June 2: Ballots mailed
• Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you; voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day
• Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4054Tue, 20 May 2014 10:00:00
Approaching Deadline, Notice to Longmont VotersDeadline Approaching to Switch Parties and Participate in Primary Election; Special Notice to Longmont Unaffiliated Voters
 
Boulder County, Colo. – This year, the American Constitution Party, Democratic Party, and Republican Party will have Primary Elections on Tuesday, June 24. In order to participate in a party primary election, a voter must be registered with that party. Friday, May 23 is the deadline for those voters who are currently registered with a political party to switch to another political party and still participate in this year’s Primary. Unaffiliated voters may affiliate up to and including Election Day; however, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office encourages affiliation sooner, in order to receive your mail ballot in a timely fashion. Unaffiliated voters who change their registration after June 16, must request a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center (see www.BoulderCountyVotes.org for locations).
 
Additionally, Primary Election ballots are typically only mailed to voters who are affiliated with a participating political party. However, the City of Longmont is conducting a Special Election in conjunction with the 2014 Primary Election. All City of Longmont voters will be receiving a ballot with the Longmont question regardless of party affiliation.

If you are a City of Longmont resident who is interested in participating in a party primary, and you are either an Unaffiliated Voter or are unaware of your party registration, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office strongly encourages you to check your voter registration. This way, you can affiliate with the party of your choice or update your voter registration prior to ballots getting mailed. Ballots will be mailed on June 2.

Boulder County voters can visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk and Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:
  • Friday, May 23:  Deadline to change party affiliation from one party to another in order to participate in the Primary Election
  • Week of June 2: Ballots mailed
  • Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you. Voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day
  • Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4047Fri, 16 May 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County seeks resident input for general election Voter Service and Polling Center locationsLocal voters requested to take online survey

Boulder County, Colo. – This fall will be the first general election carried out after the passage of last year’s Colorado Voter Access and Modernized Election Act. The law changes the Colorado election process to provide all mail ballot elections, same-day voter registration and resident access to Voter Service and Polling Centers.

The Boulder County Elections Division is conducting outreach to residents to ask local voters where they would like to access a Voter Service and Polling Center. The Elections Division will continue to utilize all Boulder County Clerk and Recorder offices for this service during the election, but we anticipate the outreach will garner new location ideas that may not have been previously considered. 

To capture resident input, we have designed an online survey. We will be collecting survey responses through Tuesday, Feb. 25:

What: Online resident input survey 

When: Available for input until Feb. 25

Who: Boulder County voters

Where: www.BoulderCountyVotes.org  or www.surveymonkey.com/s/BoulderCountyElectionsSurvey  

The Clerk & Recorder’s Office is also using this opportunity to seek ideas on ballot drop-off locations as well as input on whether residents would utilize 24-hour ballot drop-boxes prior to the election.

Voter Service and Polling Centers are places residents can drop off a mail ballot, cast a ballot in person, request a replacement ballot, register to vote or update registration information, or vote using equipment for persons with disabilities. Boulder County will have 13 Voter Service open throughout the county on Election Day with some locations opening up to two weeks early.

For additional information on elections in Boulder County, visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org.

-BoulderCountyVotes.org-

-Twitter: @BoCoClerk-


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3933Thu, 13 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Public Health provides overdose prevention trainingBoulder County, Colo. – Each day in the United States, more than 100 people die as a result of drug overdose. On October 28, 2013, Boulder County Public Health launched a new program aimed at saving lives and reversing this trend. The program provides training and overdose prevention kits containing lifesaving medication. Ten people participated in the first training and received the kits.

Rates of drug overdose have increased dramatically in the past decade, with drug overdose surpassing motor vehicle accidents as the leading cause of accidental death. Overdose deaths in the U.S. involving opioid analgesics, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone, have increased from 4,030 deaths in 1999 to 16,651 in 2010. In fact, Colorado Governor Hickenlooper declared August 31, 2013, as “Drug Overdose Awareness Day.”

“Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a healthy life, including people who use drugs,” said Carol Helwig, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease Control Program coordinator. “This program is one way to support people who are so often stigmatized in our community.”

Each overdose prevention kit contains Naloxone, also known as Narcan, which can reverse the effects of a drug overdose from opiates, including heroin and prescription opiates, such as Percocet or Oxycontin.

To receive the overdose prevention kit, participants must complete the training session, which focuses on learning the signs of overdose. Signs of overdose include: 

  • Not responsive to sound or pain, such as a sternum rub
  • Not breathing
  • Blue lips or fingertips 
  • Loud gurgling sounds

Important life-saving steps are also reviewed in the training, including calling 911, making sure the airway is clear, pinching the nose and providing a rescue breath every 5 seconds (no chest compressions), and administering naloxone.

The overdose prevention program is a collaborative effort between two Boulder County Public Health programs – the Addiction Recovery Centers (ARC) and The Works (i.e. syringe access) program – and the Denver-based Harm Reduction Action Center (HRAC), which is the largest syringe access provider in the state. HRAC has provided training and naloxone kits to 165 individuals in Colorado; of those trained, HRAC has received 52 reports of instances when naloxone was used to reverse a life-threatening overdose. 

People interested in participating in the overdose prevention program can call the Boulder County Addiction Recovery Centers at 303.441.1281.

Background

The ARC focuses on providing treatment for individuals struggling to reduce their use and abuse of drugs and alcohol. They offer several medication-assisted treatment options that combine the latest in pharmaceutical and cognitive behavioral therapies. The combination of appropriate medication with group and individual therapy has been shown to increase the amount of time clients remain drug-free. For more information about treatment options, call 303.441.1281 or visit www.BoulderCountyARC.org.

The Works Program provides harm reduction supplies and education, HIV and hepatitis C testing and counseling, and immunizations for hepatitis A and B. Supplies, education, and testing are available at Boulder County Public Health offices located in Boulder and Longmont, as well as at the Boulder County AIDS Project (BCAP) in Boulder. For more information about The Works Program or locations, call 303-413-7500 or visit www.BoulderCountyWorks.org.


 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3841Wed, 13 Nov 2013 10:00:00
Boulder County mailing ballots to voters todayBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is mailing ballots today to active, registered voters for the 2013 Coordinated Election.

So far, 199,968 Boulder County voters are set to receive mail ballots for the Tuesday, Nov. 5, election. A ballot will be sent to each active, registered voter. Each mail ballot packet includes a list of Voter Service and Polling Centers and ballot drop-off points that will open between now and Election Day. After returning their ballot, voters can check BoulderCountyVotes.org to make sure it was received.

Boulder County voters have the choice of voting by mail ballot, or at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day. They can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.

Voters who aren’t registered can still register to vote until 7 p.m. on Election Day under a new state law passed earlier this year. Visit GoVoteColorado.com with a Colorado ID or driver’s license to register online no later than Monday, Oct. 28. Or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center by 7 p.m. on Election Day to register and get a ballot.

If you have been displaced by recent flooding and have not been receiving your mail at your registered address, you might not automatically receive a ballot because ballots are not forwardable mail. However, you are still eligible to vote. Please visit www.GoVoteColorado.com to confirm or update your mailing address by Oct. 28 to receive a mail ballot, or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center through 7 p.m. on Election Day to update your voter information and obtain a ballot. 

*Note: The Elections Division mailed 2,741 ballots to voters displaced by flooding in Jamestown and Lyons on Oct. 9. The measure should help ensure elections staff can identify and reach out to voters who have changed their address and must update their registration before receiving a mail ballot.

Key Dates for the 2013 Coordinated Election:
  • Tuesday, Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to all active, registered voters. 
  • Monday, Oct. 28: Last day to register to vote online for the coordinated election. New this year, voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 5: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3795Tue, 15 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Equipment testing completed for 2013 electionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in Boulder County’s Nov. 5 Coordinated Election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test held this week.

Participants representing local municipalities and districts took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office. The tests confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes. 

The LAT also checked and confirmed that ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. The test included paper, electronic and audio ballots.

Total ballots tested: 1,163
Paper ballots: 1,058 
    • 80 by district and municipality participants
    • 978 by Elections Division staff
Electronic ballots (includes audio ballots): 105
    • 56 by district and municipality participants
    • 49 by Elections Division staff
Results and test records will be available for review next week at BoulderCountyVotes.org. Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the coordinated election.

Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check your registration or learn more about the election, and call 303-413-7740 or email Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org if you have questions. 

Key Dates for the 2013 Coordinated Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to all active, registered voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 28: Last day to register to vote online for the coordinated election. New this year, voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day.
• Tuesday, Nov. 5: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3793Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Clerk & Recorder's Louisville Office to Close July 18; Will Reopen July 23 at New Lafayette LocationBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office has selected the July moving dates for its East County office.

The last day of business at the Louisville office, 722 Main St., will be Thursday, July 18. The office will be open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. that day. The office will reopen at its new Lafayette location, 1376 Miners Drive, at 8 a.m. Tuesday, July 23. 
The East County office will be closed on Friday, July 19, and Monday, July 22, for employees to move and set up equipment. The Clerk & Recorder’s other branches at 1750 33rd St. in Boulder and 529 Coffman St. in Longmont will remain open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on those days.

The move comes after the recent sale of the building at 722 Main St. in Louisville, where the Clerk and Recorder’s office has leased space for more than 20 years. The new owners plan to repurpose the building and asked Boulder County to relocate.

The new Lafayette office will include a larger waiting area for the public, improved parking and better access for clients with disabilities. The new building will feature a large conference room that can be used as a voting center during elections.

The Lafayette building will also serve as an alternate worksite for the Assessor, Treasurer and other administrative offices, which are relocating from a county-owned building at 400 E. Simpson St. in Lafayette. 


- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk  - 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3632Tue, 11 Jun 2013 10:00:00
Final Unofficial Results Posted for 2012 General ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's office has posted the final unofficial vote tally for the 2012 General Election. Results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

The Boulder County Elections Division added 2,684 additional ballots to the tally today, for a total of 180,712 ballots counted for the Nov. 6 election. 

The ballots added today include provisional ballots, which have been under review by Elections Division staff since the day after Election Day. The staff reviews provisional ballots to make sure the voter was eligible to cast the ballot. The office reviewed the eligibility of 3,255 provisional ballots. Tuesday was the last day to verify and count provisional ballots.

The election results released today are technically “final unofficial” results. Results will be official after they are submitted to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office.

More election information: 303-413-7740 or BoulderCountyVotes.org.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3388Wed, 21 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Final Unofficial Results Available for 2012 General ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division has finished tallying votes for the 2012 General Election. Final unofficial election results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

The Elections Division has finished tallying the preliminary results of 174,364 ballots. Voter turnout for the General Election is 92.7 percent of 187,962 active registered voters in Boulder County. 

Letters are being mailed to mail-in ballot voters who need to cure their signatures or provide a photocopy of their ID in order for their votes to be counted. Voters can check their information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify whether their signature or ID was accepted. The deadline for voters to provide their signature or photocopy of ID is 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14.

Boulder County elections staff will also being reviewing and verifying provisional ballots, which will be added to the final election tally on Tuesday, Nov. 20. About 3,000 provisional ballots were cast on Election Day. A definitive tally of provisional ballots will be released later this week.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3367Wed, 07 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Most Mail-in Voters Should Have Their BallotVoters who requested a mail-in ballot before Oct. 9 should have their ballots for the upcoming election.

Voters who have not received their mail-in ballot, would like to request one, or have questions about their ballot can email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org or call 303-413-7740. Mail-in ballot requests received since Oct. 9 should be fulfilled in the next week.

Each mailed ballot packet includes a list of ballot drop-off points. A full list is also available at BoulderCountyVotes.org. For most Boulder County voters, postage for returning a ballot will cost 45 cents. However, voters who need to provide a photocopy of their ID with their returned mail ballot should affix 65 cents postage on the envelope. (Only about 3 percent of mail ballot voters fall into the ID-required category.) Postage is also explained on the instruction sheet included with each mail ballot.
 
Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 
  
Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Mail ballots sent to voters who requested them.
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Oct. 30: Last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election if the ballot is mailed.
• Friday, Nov. 2: Last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election if the ballot is picked up at the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s office.
• Friday, Nov. 2: Last day for early voting.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3347Tue, 23 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Out of Town on Election Day? You Have Options.Boulder County – Planning to be out of town on Election Day? The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office offers several options for travelers, overseas military, college students and others who can’t vote in person on Tuesday, Nov. 6:

  • Vote by mail-in ballot. If you aren’t signed up to vote by mail-in ballot, it’s not too late. Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org soon to request one. Then vote and return it to a drop-off site or Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office by 7 p.m. on Election Day. 
  • Vote at an early voting location . If you’d prefer not to receive a mail-in ballot but won’t be in town to head to your polling place on Election Day, early voting is a great option. Early voting begins Monday, Oct. 22, at our Boulder and Longmont branch offices. Additional early voting locations will open Oct. 29 in Boulder, Lafayette and Longmont. Early voting runs through Friday, Nov. 2. 
  • Request an overseas/military ballot. If you’ll be out of the country altogether, you can still request a ballot and receive it via snail mail or email – but contact us soon, because mailing a ballot overseas takes extra time. These voters have until Nov. 14 to return their ballots as long as they’re postmarked no later than Nov. 6.

Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to learn more about these options, or call 303-413-7740 for more information. You can also visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to ballot content and learn more about local elections. 

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3334Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Series of Four Boulder County "Election Labs" Open to PublicBoulder County  – The Boulder County Elections Division will host series of “Election Labs” this month to train new judges in helping polling place voters for Election Day. The election labs will simulate what a polling place will look like on Nov. 6. The events will be open to the public, including first-time voters who’d like to know what to expect at their polling place on Election Day. 

Scheduled Locations, Times and Dates:

Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street, Boulder
6 - 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17    
5 - 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 

Boulder County Parks & Open Space, 5201 St. Vrain Road, Longmont
4 - 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20  
1 - 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk - 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3333Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming electionBoulder County  – The Boulder County Elections Division will conduct a logic and accuracy test next week on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2012 general election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public, including representatives of local political parties and the media.

Scheduled Dates and Times: 
10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9;
9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, and Thursday, Oct. 11.
(The public may also observe a day of pre-testing preparation on Monday, Oct. 8, beginning at 9 a.m.)

Location: 
Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.

After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Last day to register to vote for the general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3318Tue, 02 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Deadline Approaching: Tuesday, Oct. 9 is Last Day to Register to VoteBoulder County – If you aren’t registered to vote, you have just one week left to do so if you’d like to cast a ballot in the general election.

Tuesday, Oct. 9, is the last day to register to vote for the Nov. 6 election. 

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. 

They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3315Mon, 01 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Watch for Voter Information Postcard in Your Mailbox This WeekBoulder County – Voters should check their mailboxes this week for postcards detailing key information on how to cast a ballot in the Nov. 6 general election.

About 175,000 voters in Boulder County will receive the postcards from the Clerk & Recorder’s Office.

For voters who’ve signed up to receive a mail ballot, each postcard gives the voter’s precinct number and tells them to watch for their mail ballot during the week of Oct. 15. About 113,000 Boulder County voters will receive this card.

For polling place voters, the card gives the voter’s precinct number, designated Election Day polling place and details about early voting, which begins the week of Oct. 22. About 62,000 Boulder County voters will receive this card.

Residents who have not registered to vote will not receive a postcard, though they can still register by Oct. 9 and cast a ballot in the election.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections.

They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Last day to register to vote if you want to participate in the Nov. 6 general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3310Tue, 25 Sep 2012 10:00:00
Statement from Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall on Dismissal of Court CaseBoulder County – U.S. District Judge Christine Arguello this morning dismissed the Citizen Center v. Gessler case, in which Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall had been named as a defendant. The court also denied a related motion for a preliminary injunction that could have prevented Boulder County from printing its ballots as planned for the Nov. 6 general election. The Boulder County Elections Division will proceed with its plan to print ballots.

Clerk Hall offered the following response to the judge’s ruling: 

"We’ve always worked very hard to ensure election integrity in Boulder County. We’ve designed paper ballots that will keep your vote anonymous and allow for efficient, accurate tallying on Election Night. Earlier this year, I helped draft legislation to create a process that lets the public review voted ballots after an election. And Boulder County has one of the most advanced and thorough post-election audits in the U.S. 

"I’m happy the judge’s decision will allow us to continue our work as planned. The dismissal of the case is a relief because it will allow me to devote more of my time to overseeing our preparations for the general election." 

For more on Boulder County’s ballot design and printing process, see Hall’s recent op-ed.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Deadline to register to voter if wish to cast a ballot in the Nov. 6 general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk




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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3305Fri, 21 Sep 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County's Primary Election Audit Open to PublicBoulder County – The public is invited to observe Boulder County’s enhanced audit for the 2012 primary election beginning Saturday at noon. The audit is a post-election quality assurance test that ensures the accuracy of the machine tally of votes.

Boulder County’s enhanced audit uses randomly selected ballots from all scanning systems and compares a manual tally of votes with the actual election-night machine tally of the same ballots. Any discrepancy is investigated. A final report is issued to the Boulder County Canvass Board for verification before the election is certified.

Members of the public can observe the audit process at the Boulder County Ballot Processing Center, 1750 33rd St., Boulder. Contests and ballot batches will be randomly selected from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Ballots will be manually tallied and compared with machines tallies from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday. The audit will continue from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday or until the test is finished.

Complete audit details and data will be available at BoulderCountyVotes.org by 5 p.m. Friday, July 6.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3187Thu, 28 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to host primary election open houseBoulder County – Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will host a primary election open house from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 25, at the Ballot Processing Center, 1750 33rd St. in Boulder.

The event offers people interested in local elections a chance to see how ballots are processed and learn more about Boulder County’s elections procedures. Hall will explain how the mail-ballot primary is being conducted and answer questions. Visitors will be able to observe workers processing early-return ballots for the June 26 primary election. 

This election is being conducted entirely by mail ballot. Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, find a service center or ballot drop-off site, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 

They can also call 303-413-7740 or email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org for information or visit one of three Boulder County election service centers.
  
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
• Tuesday, June 19: Last day to request a replacement ballot if you’d like to receive it by mail. 
• Monday, June 18, through Tuesday, June 26: Voters requesting a replacement ballot can apply for and receive one in person at one of three service centers. 
• Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3174Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Affiliated Boulder County Voters: You Should Have Your Primary Ballot
Boulder County – Eligible, affiliated voters should have their mail ballots for the 2012 Boulder County primary election.

Voters affiliated with the Democratic, Republican and American Constitution parties may vote in the June 26 primary. Voters who have not received a primary ballot or who have questions about their ballot can email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org or call 303-413-7740.

The June 26 primary election is being conducted entirely by mail ballot. Each mailed ballot packet includes a list of ballot drop-off points and service centers that will open next week.
 
Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 
  
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
• Tuesday, June 19: Last day to request a replacement ballot if you’d like to receive it by mail. 
• Monday, June 18, through Tuesday, June 26: Voters requesting a replacement ballot can apply for and receive one in person at one of three service centers. 
• Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3163Tue, 12 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Sheriff Pelle Expands Fire BanFROM:            SHERIFF JOE PELLE

REF:                NEW AND ADDITIONAL FIRE RESTRICTIONS

EFFECTIVE:   JUNE 11, 2012 5 P.M.

 

 

Ongoing dry and windy conditions, and Red Flag Warnings on a daily basis, have pushed us into extreme fire danger regionally and county-wide.  Additionally, huge fires in Larimer County, Wyoming, New Mexico, and throughout other parts of the State have strained fire-fighting resources locally and regionally.

 

The forecast shows no signs of immediate relief.

 

With these conditions in mind, we are upgrading our current ban on open-fires.  Effective at 5pm today, there will be no open burning of any kind allowed anywhere in unincorporated Boulder County.  This includes slash piles, agricultural burning, camp fires, bon fires, charcoal grills, etc. regardless of location, (mountains or plains). Only liquid gas or propane fired cooking stoves will be allowed for outdoor use. The use and sale of fireworks is also banned throughout the unincorporated county.

 

Violation of this order may result in a $500 fine for the first offense and escalates with subsequent violations. 

 

Deputies will begin enforcing this resolution tonight, and informing campground hosts, etc. of the new rules while they make their rounds. 
 
-www.BoulderSheriff.org-
 
Reference:  Amended Fire Ban (6/11/12)
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3159Mon, 11 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Equipment testing complete for June 26 primary electionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in the county’s upcoming mail-ballot primary election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test held Wednesday and Thursday.

Representatives from the local Democratic and Republican parties took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office that confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes. 

The LAT also confirmed ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. The test included mail-in, electronic and audio ballots. In all, 3,454 ballots were tested, including 3,379 paper ballots and 75 electronic ballots on voting machines. 
 
Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the primary election.
 
Results and test records are available for review at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
The June 26 primary election is being conducted by mail ballot. Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check your registration or learn more about the election, and call 303-413-7740 or email Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org if you have questions. 
 
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
Friday, May 25: Last day for voters to change or withdraw from party affiliation before the primary.
Tuesday, May 29: Last day to register to vote for the primary election.
Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3131Fri, 25 May 2012 10:00:00
Time running out to change affiliation, register to vote for primary election 

Boulder County  – Residents who plan to cast a ballot in the June 26 primary election have just a few days left to change party affiliation or register to vote. 

Republican, Democratic, American Constitution and minor party members who’d like to change their party affiliation before the primary must do so no later than Friday, May 25. Unregistered voters who’d like to register to vote and participate in the primary must do so no later than Tuesday, May 29. 

Unaffiliated voters may affiliate with a party and participate in its primary up to and including Primary Election Day on June 26.

Voters who have moved since the previous election should update their registration if they plan to vote in the primary.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The upcoming primary election will be conducted by mail ballot. Only affiliated voters will receive a ballot. Primary Election Day is June 26, but voters will begin receiving their ballots during the week of June 4. Each ballot packet will include details about expanded Clerk & Recorder’s office hours, election service centers and ballot drop-off sites for the June primary.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3123Fri, 18 May 2012 10:00:00
Deadlines Approaching to Change Affiliation, Register to Vote for PrimaryBoulder County  – Residents who plan to cast a ballot in the June 26 primary election have a few weeks left to change party affiliation or register to vote. 

Republicans, Democrats and American Constitution Party members who’d like to change their party affiliation before the primary must do so no later than Friday, May 25. Unregistered voters who’d like to register to vote and participate in the primary must do so no later than Tuesday, May 29. Voters who have moved since the previous election should update their registration if they plan to vote in the primary.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
 
The upcoming primary election will be conducted by mail ballot. Only affiliated voters will receive a ballot. Primary Election Day is June 26, but voters will begin receiving their ballots during the week of June 4. Each ballot packet will include details about expanded Clerk & Recorder’s office hours, election service centers and ballot drop-off sites for the June primary.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3116Fri, 11 May 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to Test Ballots and Equipment for Upcoming Primary ElectionBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Elections Division beginning Wednesday, May 23, will conduct a logic and accuracy test on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2012 primary election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public, including representatives of local political parties and the media.

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, through Friday, May 25 (or until testing concludes). A pre-testing setup day is also open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 22.

Where: Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.

After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org

For more elections information, including ballot content for the June 26 primary, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org.

Other Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:

  • Friday, May 25: Last day for voters to change or withdraw major party affiliation before the primary.
  • Tuesday, May 29: Last day to register to vote for the primary election.
  • Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.

-BoulderCountyVotes.org-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3113Monday, May 08, 2012
Boulder County to Conduct 2012 Primary Election by Mail Ballot

Boulder County – The Board of County Commissioners today approved Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall’s plan to conduct a mail ballot election with service centers for the 2012 primary election. 

Boulder County’s Elections Division examined several factors to decide how to conduct this year’s June 26 primary election, including voting method preferences in Boulder County, turnout, costs, and comments received from the public. 

The county conducted its first mail-ballot primary in 2010, and has conducted odd-year elections by mail ballot since 2001. Election officials estimate they saved $180,000 by conducting the 2010 primary as an all-mail ballot election rather than a polling place election.

The 2010 primary also saw an increase in voter turnout consistent with mail ballot elections. Turnout grew from 29 percent in the 2008 polling place primary to 43 percent in the 2010 mail ballot primary. 

Of about 97,000 active registered voters affiliated with a political party in Boulder County, about 67,000 have signed up as permanent mail-in voters. Of the roughly 145,000 active registered voters in Boulder County, about 95,000 are PMIVs.

Primary ballots will be mailed beginning June 4. Several service centers will be available in Boulder County from June 18-26 for voters to vote in person, update their registration, drop off voted ballots or request replacement ballots.

The deadline for affiliated voters to change their affiliation to vote in the primary election, or to withdraw their affiliation, is May 25. The deadline to register to vote is May 29.

Voters can check their registration information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify update their registration, address information and affiliation. 

- www.BoulderCountyVotes.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3005Thu, 16 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County statement on oil and gas drilling from Commissioners Cindy Domenico, Will Toor and Deb Gardner:Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is concerned about the potential for significantly expanded oil and gas drilling within the county, and supports appropriate, tighter restrictions on drilling and increased local control to mitigate the impacts of these activities.

However, Boulder County and other local governments in Colorado do not have complete authority to regulate drilling. In order to ensure both our Comprehensive Plan and Land Use regulations are as thorough and up-to-date as possible, today we approved a temporary moratorium on the processing of the required development plans for local oil and gas permits under the county Land Use Code (Resolution 2012-16). This will give us time to make sure that, within the limits of our legal authority, we are able to mitigate local impacts from these activities and to maximize protection for the people and environment of Boulder County.

Boulder County does not voluntarily allow oil and gas drilling on its open space properties. Like many private landowners, we often do not own the rights to a given property’s oil and gas deposits. In other cases, the mineral rights were leased prior to acquisition of the land by the county. In those instances, the county does not have the ability to prohibit drilling, even though it is the surface landowner. As the surface owner, we do negotiate surface use agreements prior to drilling, and in doing so, we attempt to minimize those impacts to the maximum extent possible.

Through our Land Use Code, we do have some local authority over oil and gas drilling on private and public land; however, substantial authority for regulation of oil and gas operations lies with the state and federal governments, so there are limits on what we can restrict. For instance, it is unlikely that Boulder County could simply prohibit hydraulic fracturing on either public or private land in the county.

Boulder County has and is actively supporting efforts to strengthen state regulation, and to expand local authority in the area of oil and gas drilling. We supported legislation signed by former Gov. Bill Ritter to strengthen oil and gas rules and to reform the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. We have also advocated for a stronger disclosure requirements of fracking fluids, although the COGCC ultimately approved requirements that did not include our requests for a process that would allow any leaks to be traced, nor for pre- and post-drilling water monitoring. Finally, we are supportive of legislation that Rep. Matt Jones of Louisville is sponsoring in the 2012 General Assembly to expand local authority over drilling.

We also authorized staff to set a public hearing for Thursday, March 1 to take public testimony on the local impacts associated with oil and gas development, and on the appropriateness of continuing or amending the temporary moratorium on the processing of land use applications for oil and gas development which we approved today. This meeting will begin at 4 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room on the third floor of the Boulder County Courthouse at 1325 Pearl St. in Boulder. Staff from several county departments will be making presentations regarding our current regulations and the development we have seen on our open space properties.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2986Thu, 02 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Elections Division Seeks Input on Proposed Mail Ballot Primary ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is collecting public comments on its proposal to conduct the June 26 primary election by mail ballot.

Members of the public who want to offer feedback can email their comments to Boulder County’s Elections Division at vote@bouldercountyvotes.org. The matter is tentatively scheduled to go before the Board of County Commissioners for approval on Thursday, Feb. 16. Please send written comments no later than Monday, Feb. 13.

Boulder County conducted its 2010 primary election, as well as its November 2011 coordinated election, by mail ballot. The November 2012 general election will use polling places as well as mail ballots.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2980Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County Precinct Boundary Changes ApprovedBoulder County -- The Board of County Commissioners this morning voted 2-0 to approve updates to the county’s precinct lines and political district maps.

Boulder County’s Elections Division and Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall developed the new map to reflect redistricting decisions made at the state level in 2011. The updates take into account new boundaries for the county’s U.S. House, Colorado Senate and Colorado House representative districts.

The new precinct map will be used for the 2012 election cycle.

As part of the update, the Elections Division staff also introduced a new numbering system that labels precincts geographically. They’re separated into nine categories by municipality or region to make precinct data easier to sort. For example, all Boulder precincts are numbered in the 800s while Longmont’s are in the 600s.

A copy of this morning’s presentation by Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall, which includes details about the new numbering system, is available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2955Tue, 03 Jan 2012 10:00:00
Caucus affiliation deadlines approachingBoulder County, Colo. – Deadlines are already approaching for voters who want to switch party affiliation before caucuses are held during the 2012 election cycle.

Registered voters who want to participate in the Republican Party caucus, to be held Feb. 7, 2012, must affiliate with the GOP no later than Wednesday, Dec. 7. They can do so by updating their voter information at BoulderCountyVotes.org or calling the Boulder County Elections Division at 303-413-7740.

Registered Republican voters who’ve moved recently must update their voter information by Monday, Jan. 9, to participate in the GOP caucus. First-time voters, such as naturalized citizens or those who turn 18 before Feb. 7, must register no later than Jan. 9 if they want to participate in the Republican caucus.

Registered voters who want to affiliate with the Democratic Party or American Constitution Party, both of which will hold caucuses on March 6, have until Friday, Jan. 6, to affiliate.

First-time voters and members of those parties who’ve moved recently must update their voter information by Monday, Feb. 6, to participate in the Democratic or American Constitution caucuses on March 6.
 
Each political party organizes and conducts its own caucus. For more information about a party’s caucus, contact local party leaders.

For more election information, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- www.BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2923Thu, 01 Dec 2011 10:00:00
Boulder County 2011 Election Results Now OfficialBoulder County – The final, official results from Boulder County’s 2011 coordinated election are available now at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
The final official results include the statement of vote, a document that shows precinct-by-precinct results for every issue on Boulder County ballots this year. The statement of vote will be forwarded to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office to become part of the official statewide election record.
 
Earlier this week, elections staff completed the 2011 election audit, a post-election quality assurance test that ensures the accuracy of the machine tally of votes. Boulder County’s enhanced audit uses randomly selected ballots from all scanning systems and compares a manual tally of votes with the actual election-night machine tally of the same ballots. Any discrepancy is investigated. A final report is issued to the Boulder County Canvass Board for verification prior to election certification.
 
The Boulder County Canvass Board on Tuesday certified the election and signed off on the audit. This year’s Canvass Board consisted of Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall, Longmont City Clerk Valeria Skitt and Boulder City Clerk Alisa Lewis.

More election information is available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2912Fri, 18 Nov 2011 10:00:00
UPDATED: Boulder County 2011 Coordinated Election ResultsBoulder County - The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office added 849 ballots tonight to the unofficial 2011 coordinated election results at BoulderCountyVotes.org. This increases the total number of ballots tallied for the election to 83,573, up from 82,724.
 
Election results remain unofficial until the Boulder County Canvass Board certifies the abstract of votes cast, due Friday, Nov. 18.
 
The updated tally includes ballots from overseas voters as well as voters who needed to add or confirm a signature on their mail-ballot envelope or provide ID for their ballot to be counted. All of the ballots were voted on or before Election Day on Nov. 1.
 
Under state law, voters who needed to cure their ballots had until the close of business today to do so. The Elections Division last week sent these voters instructions on how to make sure their ballots were included in the final tally. Overseas military and other voters living abroad had until 4:30 p.m. today for their ballots to be in the hands of the Elections Division as long as the return envelopes were postmarked no later than Nov. 1.
 
Election results are undergoing an audit this week. The Canvass Board review and final certification are set for next week. 
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2899Wed, 09 Nov 2011 10:00:00
Recount of Boulder County Question 1D completeBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Elections Division has completed recounting 63,275 ballots for Boulder County Question 1D. The measure, which extends the term limits for the District Attorney to a maximum of three terms, passed by nine votes.

Final recount results for Boulder County Question 1D are 29,966 votes in favor of the measure and 29,957 votes against the measure.

Representatives of the Boulder County canvass board certified the final results of the recount at 2 p.m. on Friday, November 20.

“The purpose of the recount is to ensure that every vote that should have been counted was included in the results,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “We are confident that with the processes we have in place we have accomplished this goal.”

Five votes changed during the recount for a net difference of three votes. These five vote changes can be explained by the following:

  • During the recount process two ‘yes’ votes were determined to be undervotes.
  • Three other votes (two ‘yes’ votes and one ‘no’ vote) were deemed overvotes by the recount resolution teams due to a lack of  clarity of the voter’s intent. 
  • Undervotes and overvotes cannot be counted.

Final results for the contest are available online at www.VoteBoulder.org.

-END-

Contact: Jessie Cornelius 303-413-7766
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1924Fri, 20 Nov 2009 10:00:00
Official results for the 2009 Coordinated Election are available onlineBoulder County, Colo. - The Boulder County canvass board certified the results of the 2009 Coordinated Election on Monday and a mandatory recount of Boulder County Question 1D will commence on Tuesday.

The canvass board, which was comprised of representatives of the entities coordinating in the election, signed paperwork at 11 a.m. Monday certifying the election results. During the canvass, the board verified the number of ballots counted in the election and ensured they did not exceed the number of people who voted. A total of 63,320 ballots were cast in this year’s election. The canvass board also conducted a review of the audit report to ensure the election results were accurate.

Boulder County completed verifying the machine tally of votes on Friday during its enhanced election audit. The audit included examining 20 contests on this year’s ballot that had close margins of victory, including Boulder County Question 1D and the Boulder County Nederland Community Library District Ballot Issue 5B.

“We manually counted 22,139 votes for the audit and compared them to election night results to ensure the accuracy of the election night totals,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “I want to thank my staff and the audit board for their diligent work during this process.”

The election results have determined the need for a mandatory recount of all ballots cast that include Boulder County Ballot Question 1D, where the difference of ‘yes’ and ‘no’ votes was a total of 12. The threshold for a mandatory recount in that contest was 150 votes or less. The margins in all other contests are wide enough that a mandatory recount will not be required.

The recount of Boulder County Question 1D will begin on Tuesday with a pretest of the scanning equipment. During this test, election officials will scan four batches of 150 ballots through each of the four scanners used during the election. The machine tally of votes will be compared with a manual tally of votes. If the tallies match, the recount will proceed by scanning all 63,275 ballots that include Boulder County Question 1D.

If there are any discrepancies in the pretest results that cannot be explained by voter error, the Elections Division will conduct a manual recount of all ballots cast that include Boulder County Question 1D.

Members of the press and public are welcome to observe the recount process. The recount will be conducted at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office in Boulder, 1750 33rd St. Contact Jessie Cornelius for details at 303-413-7766 or e-mail jcornelius@bouldercounty.org.

Official election results can be viewed at www.VoteBoulder.org.
-BoulderCounty.org-

Contact: Jessie Cornelius, 303-413-7766


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1917Mon, 16 Nov 2009 10:00:00
Collector vehicles are now defined as model years 1975 and older(Boulder County, Colo.) - A new state law that becomes effective on September 1, will require vehicles to have a model year of 1975 and older in order to be eligible to register for a “Collector Vehicle” license plate. Collector vehicles were previously defined as those 25 years and older.

Vehicles with a model year of 1976 and newer that already display “Collector Vehicle” license plates will be allowed to maintain their plate status as long as the registration is renewed on time. If the registration expires on models 1976 and newer, the vehicles will be required to pass an emissions test and will be registered with standard license plates. Additionally, if a vehicle with a model year of 1976 and newer is sold to a new owner, it will no longer qualify for the “Collector Vehicle” license plate.

The Boulder County Motor Vehicle Division has sent letters to vehicle owners who could be immediately impacted by the new law. Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed Senate Bill 09-003 into law on June 1, which changed the definition of collector vehicles.

If you have any questions, please contact the Motor Vehicle Division at 303-413-7710 or email motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org

-END-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1796Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:00:00
Colorado's motor vehicle registration fees increase beginning July 1, 2009Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

Effective July 1, 2009, a new State law will begin increasing Colorado's motor vehicle registration fees over a three-year period. The new fees will be based on a vehicle’s weight and are in addition to all other registration fees.

Vehicle registration fees will increase each year by the following amounts:

For any vehicle weighing 2,000 pounds or less, which includes motorcycles and small trailers:
• $22.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $25.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $29.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing between 2,001-5,000 pounds, which includes most cars, SUVs, and light trucks:
• $32.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $36.50: July 2010 – June 2011
• $41.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 5,001-10,000 pounds, which includes most large trucks and large SUVs:
• $39.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $45.25: July 2010 – June 2011
• $51.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 10,001-16,000 pounds, which includes most passenger buses:
• $51.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $58.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $66.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing more than 16,000 pounds, which includes most commercial trucks:
• $55.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $63.00: July 2010 – June 2011
• $71.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

The new law already requires Colorado residents to pay an additional $25 each month they are late to register their vehicle. Late fees may not exceed $100. Permits are also subject to late fees.

The registration fees and late fee increases are mandated by the FASTER bill (Senate Bill 09-108), which Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed into law on Monday, March 2. For complete details on the bill, visit Senate Bill 09-108. All funds generated from the fees will be used to maintain Colorado roads and bridges.

If you have any questions, please contact the Motor Vehicle Division at 303.413.7710 or email motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org.

-END-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1714Thu, 18 Jun 2009 10:00:00
Increased Motor Vehicle fees phase in beginning June 1, 2009Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

A new Colorado State law will increase Motor Vehicle late fees to $25 a month beginning June 1, 2009. Registration fees will also increase beginning July 1, 2009. Funds generated from the fees will be used to maintain Colorado roads and bridges.  

Colorado residents will now be required to pay an additional $25 for each month their vehicle’s registration is late. The late fees may not exceed $100.

“We would like Boulder County residents to be aware of these costs, especially the late fees imposed by the new State law,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “I hope residents will be able to avoid some of these costs by renewing their registrations on time.”

Motor Vehicle registration fees will also increase over a three-year period beginning July 1, as part of the legislation’s road and bridge safety surcharges. All registration fee increases are based on a vehicle’s weight.

Vehicle registration fees will increase each year by the following amounts:

For any vehicle weighing 2,000 pounds or less, which includes motorcycles and small trailers:
• $22.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $25.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $29.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing between 2,001-5,000 pounds, which includes most cars, SUVs, and light trucks:
• $32.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $36.50: July 2010 – June 2011
• $41.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 5,001-10,000 pounds, which includes most large trucks and large SUVs:
• $39.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $45.25: July 2010 – June 2011
• $51.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 10,001-16,000 pounds, which includes most passenger buses:
• $51.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $58.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $66.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing more than 16,000 pounds, which includes most commercial trucks:
• $55.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $63.00: July 2010 – June 2011
• $71.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

The late fees and registration fee increases are mandated by the FASTER bill (Senate Bill 09-108), which Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed into law on Monday, March 2. For complete details on the bill, visit Senate Bill 09-108.

-End-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1677Fri, 15 May 2009 10:00:00
Boulder County Motor Vehicle launches convenient online tool to estimate registration fees.Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

(Boulder County, Colo.) - Boulder County residents can now calculate an estimate of their registration fees for newly purchased cars or light trucks on the Boulder County Motor Vehicle Web site. Boulder County’s new tool is one of the first of its kind in the State of Colorado.

“The calculator is intended to help members of the public budget for their registration fees,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “Fees still need to be confirmed and paid by visiting our office but this will at least give an idea of the costs.”

The public can visit the Motor Vehicle Fee Estimation Calculator at http://www.bouldercounty.org/register/motorvehicle/pages/mvfeecalc.aspx. A registration fee estimate can be obtained by providing the following information:
•        Year of the Vehicle
•        Vehicle Type
•        Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) or Vehicle Taxable Value
•        Fuel Type
•        Vehicle Weight
•        Purchase Date
•        Registration Date
A Title Complete Notice with the necessary information is sent to residents upon purchase of a vehicle. Vehicle information can also be obtained from a licensed auto dealer. Users should read the site’s Term Definition Guidelines carefully before entering calculation data.

“Motor Vehicle registration costs are calculated by several factors," said Hall. “As long as accurate data is provided online, the estimate should be very close to the registration fee.”

Newly purchased vehicles must be registered in person in the County in which you reside in the State of Colorado. Registrations can be completed in Boulder County at any of the Motor Vehicle branch office locations:
•        1750 33rd Street, Boulder
•        529 Coffman Street, Longmont
•        722 Main Street, Louisville

The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is encouraging residents to email their feedback on the calculator to motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org. Registrations can be renewed online by visiting http://www.bouldercounty.org/register/motorvehicle

-END-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1672Thu, 07 May 2009 10:00:00
County to launch new bus service in 2008FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

December 11, 2007

 

CONTACT: Tim Swope, Boulder County Alternative Transportation Coordinator, 720-564-2658

 

County to launch new bus service in 2008

New routes connect East County to jobs, schools, hospital, US36 transit

 

Residents in east Boulder County will gain a brand new bus route and expanded service on an existing route in 2008, making it easier for them to access work, school, medical care and shopping.

 

The Boulder County Commissioners have approved the use of funds from the County’s Transportation Sales Tax to partner with RTD in providing two new bus services in Louisville, Lafayette and Erie. The first will extend the seven-year-old JUMP service to East County Line Road in Erie. The second will launch a new “LYNX” service connecting downtown Louisville and west Louisville neighborhoods to the US36 Corridor.

 

The JUMP currently travels though Boulder every 10 minutes, with service to the Lafayette park-n-Ride every 20 minutes. The proposed extension would travel through Lafayette along Arapahoe Road and Baseline Road, then head north through the Boulder County sections of Erie to the currently planned terminus at the Erie Town Community Center at the intersection of East County Line Road and Leon Wurl Parkway.

 

“Growth in Erie and Lafayette, along with continued in-commuting from areas east of Boulder County, warrant an extension of this bus service. Both RTD and Boulder County have long sought a more direct transit service to Erie, and folks in Erie have been encouraging us to start the service as soon as possible,” said Boulder County Commissioner Will Toor. “This service will carry out the commitment we made to county voters when they supported the countywide transportation sales tax.”

 

The new LYNX bus will offer transit service from the Louisville Library (in downtown Louisville) south to Monarch High School, Avista Hospital, the Flatirons Crossing park-n-Ride and the Broomfield park-n-Ride.

 

The services are scheduled to start this summer. Both services will be funded through a combination of Federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality grants and revenue from the Boulder County Transportation sales tax, which county residents approved in 2001. During the 2007 election, County voters approved an extension of the sales tax, beginning in 2009.

 

Details of the LYNX and JUMP services and the County’s agreements with RTD have not yet been finalized. “We still have to work out the details with RTD, our local partners, and the Regional funding agencies about how this is going to work,” Transportation Director George Gerstle explained. “Originally we had wanted to launch this service sooner, but we are very excited that this most recent proposal offers residents a better service at a lower long-term cost to both the County and RTD.” 

 

-END-

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=991Tue, 11 Dec 2007 10:00:00
Public invited to provide comments on proposed Sustainability Element, County Comp Plan - Wed., May 16 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 14, 2007

 

Contact: Michelle Krezek, Boulder County Land Use Department (720) 564-2623

 

Public invited to provide comments on proposed Sustainability Element for County Comp Plan

 

The Boulder County Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing for the evening of Wednesday, May 16, to take public testimony on adopting a new Sustainability Element for the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan.

 

The hearing will take place:

 

When:     May 16, 2007, 7:00 p.m.

Where:    3rd Floor Hearing Room, Boulder County Courthouse, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

 

As proposed, the new Sustainability Element will help create a framework of sustainable policies and practices for future land use in unincorporated Boulder County. The element gives broad, inclusive goals to help guide future regulations while also providing specific direction on policies such as an expanded transfer of development rights program, structure size, and green building.

 

The Planning Commission will take public testimony at Wednesday night's hearing and it is anticipated that they will then take action to adopt the Goals and Policies making them a part of the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan. Once the Element is adopted, the County Land Use Department will begin work on programs to implement these goals and policies.

 

For additional information, please contact Michelle Krezek at mkrezek@co.boulder.co.us or 720.564.2623. A copy of the draft goals and policies of the Sustainability Element can be found at: www.co.boulder.co.us/lu.

 

-END-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=812Mon, 14 May 2007 10:00:00
Boulder County Land Use Director sworn in as President of American Institute of Certified Planners

Contact:  Barb Halpin, Boulder County Public Information Officer, 303-441-1622

 

Philadelphia, Pa - Boulder County Land Use Department Director Graham Billingsley officially took office today as president of the American Planning Association’s (APA) professional institute, the American Institute of Certified Planners. The swearing in ceremony was conducted as part of APA’s National Planning Conference in Philadelphia.

 

Graham has served as president-elect for the past year and will now serve as president for a two-year term. As president, he is responsible for heading up the American Institute of Certified Planners Commission and guiding certification, accreditation, professional development and ethics within the planning community. The presidency is a voluntary position.

 

Billingsley has served as director of the Boulder County Land Use Department since 1989 and has played a critical role in facilitating an ongoing public process of updating both the County’s Comprehensive Plan and the County’s Land Use Code. As a result of his efforts, other communities often look to Boulder County as an innovative role model for long term, smart growth planning.

 

Graham's 18-year tenure at Boulder County has included the adoption of a site plan review program for all new construction; the adoption of numerous intergovernmental agreements creating urban growth boundaries for all communities in the county; and a transfer of development rights program that has led to the preservation of more than 6,000 acres.

 

Most recently, Billingsley has helped oversee an extensive review and revision process for the existing land use code, a process that is putting sustainable land use policies and practices in the forefront of future planning and development.

 

Billingsley’s career in the planning profession spans more than 30 years of service in public and private sectors in Colorado, Texas, Missouri and Ohio. He served as president of the APA Colorado chapter for four years (from 2002-06), and has held a number of other offices in professional planning organizations.

 

APA is a 41,000-member organization committed to promoting good planning processes. The professional institute, which constitutes 16,000 of those members, certifies planners and focuses on ethics, professional development and standards of professional practice. For more information about APA, please visit: www.planning.org.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=789Tue, 17 Apr 2007 10:00:00