Boulder County - Press Releaseshttp://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/?z=1Boulder County Press ReleasesInterested Election Judges Must Contact Party Chairs in Advance of Saturday TrainingBoulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division would like any individual that is still interested in serving as an election judge/temporary election worker to contact their political party chair about being appointed to a position prior to attending the Saturday training that was mentioned in a recent news story.

 

Specifically, the recent news article mentioned the need for additional Republican Party election judges for Signature Verification roles. Those positions have been filled by the Republican Party Chair and any additional interested individuals must contact the party.

 

If you are an unaffiliated voter who would like to work the election or are interested in working in a position other than Signature Verification, please contact Lynn Swearingen at lswearingen@bouldercounty.org or 303-413-7551 for additional information.

 

If you have any questions or would like information about the upcoming General Election, please visit BoulderCountyVotes.org or contact us at 303.413.7740 or Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org.

 

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4261Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Clerk & Recorder to Host Two General Election Open Houses

Boulder County – Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will host a General Election open house on Saturday, November 1 and Monday, November 3 at the Elections Division Ballot Processing Center. Attendees will be able to tour the ballot processing wing.

 

What:  Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Elections Division Open Houses

When:  Saturday, November 1, 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., with tours approximately every half hour as needed

            Monday, November 3, 4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., with tours approximately every half hour as needed

Where: 1750 33rd Street in Boulder – Elections Division Ballot Processing Wing (look for signs)

 

During each open house, Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will give walking tours of the election wing approximately every 30 minutes as needed.

 

These tours offer people interested in local elections the opportunity to see how ballots are processed, understand how signatures are verified on mail ballots, and learn about how ballot resolution works among other ballot processing procedures and safeguards. Hall, along with other staff, will be available to answer questions about the election. Visitors will be able to observe workers processing ballots for the Tuesday, November 4 General Election.

 

If you have any questions or would like more information about the open house or the upcoming General Election, please contact the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s office at 303.413.7740.

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4260Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Left Hand Creek Draft Master Plan available for public review and commentBoulder County, Colo. – AMEC Environment and Infrastructure, the Left Hand Creek Coalition’s master plan consultant team, has released the draft master plan for flood recovery and restoration projects for the Left Hand Creek Watershed. The draft plan is available online and the public is encouraged to provide input on the draft recovery and restoration projects. Two community meetings were held to gather input from the public on the draft plan.

 

The draft report includes:

·         Ecological Assessment:  Evaluation of the overall condition of streams, riparian zones, and in-stream habitat.  Recommendations from this assessment are focused on strategies to re-establish or improve the ecosystem throughout the channel corridor.

·         Geomorphic Assessment: Evaluation of the physical characteristics of the channel and how the channel has changed shape over time.  Recommendations from this assessment provide guidance on where the channel should be placed and how it should be shaped for long-term stability.

·         Project Recommendations: The draft plan includes a description of recommended projects throughout the watershed. Projects were identified to reduce flood risk while sustaining the values of watershed stakeholders.

 

Comments on the draft master plan will be accepted until November 3, 2014. The final plan will be released in mid-November.

 

“The Left Hand Creek Draft Master Plan identifies 48 recommended projects that, when implemented, will help restore the Left Hand Creek Watershed,” said Luke Swan, the Left Hand Creek Watershed Master Plan Project Manager, for AMEC. “We are eager to hear feedback from the public on the Left Hand Creek Draft Master Plan. We will then incorporate the input into the final Plan.”

 

As the master plan nears completion, conversations have begun to discuss post-master plan coordination and project implementation with local agencies, landowners, and stakeholders. Project implementation will be dependent upon securing funding for projects.

 

“The completion of the master plan will be a big step forward for the recovery of Left Hand Creek. But there is much work to be done to implement the projects identified in the master plan,” said Julie McKay, Boulder County Creek Planning Program Manager. “Long-term recovery of Left Hand Creek depends on participation from landowners, residents, and other stakeholders.”

 

The Left Hand Creek Coalition is overseeing the development of the Left Hand Creek Master Plan. The Left Hand Creek Coalition members are government and local agencies that operate in the watershed, including the Left Hand Watershed Oversight Group and the James Creek Watershed Initiative. 

 

Similar master planning efforts are underway for many other watersheds in Boulder County, including St. Vrain Creek, the Little Thompson River, and Fourmile Creek. For more information on any of the master plans, please contact Stacey Proctor, Communications Specialist at 303-441-1107 or sproctor@bouldercounty.org.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4259Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Important Reminders for Boulder County VotersBoulder County Boulder County Elections Division wants to remind voters that the General Election is less than a week away. Make your voice count by getting your ballot returned properly or voting in person. Here is what you need to know:

 

 -Your signature is what makes your vote count! No mail ballot is ever processed and counted without a bipartisan team of election judges verifying that the signature on your ballot envelope matches the signature on your voter registration record. So make sure to sign your ballot envelope as you normally would – then check to make sure we received your mail ballot by visiting BoulderCountyVotes.org.

 

-It is too late to mail your ballot, but Drive-By Ballot Drop-Off begins this Friday.  Beginning Friday at 8 a.m., voters don’t even need to exit their car to cast their ballot. Drive-by ballot drop-off locations open in Boulder, Longmont, Louisville, and a new walk-up station in Erie. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Monday; 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Election Day. And remember, Boulder County also has three 24-Hour Ballot Drop Boxes open every day, 24-hours a day, until 7 p.m. on Tuesday, November 4, Election Day.

 

-Saturday In-person Voting. Want to vote in person? Avoid the rush and visit one our Voter Service and Polling Centers this Saturday from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Services available include: same-day voter registration and voting, in-person voting, ballot drop-off, replacement ballots, and voting using equipment and facilities for person with disabilities.

 

Also, any citizen who has resided in Colorado at least 22 days may register up to and including Election Day. Just visit any Voter Service and Polling Center and don’t forget to bring your ID.

 

Please visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, see if your ballot has been processed if returned, or find more information about the election.

 

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4258Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Molly Tayer: Voting Is More Convenient and Secure Than EverAcross Boulder County, as voters begin to return their mail ballots for the Nov. 4 General Election, the electorate should know that with the implementation of 2013's Colorado Voter Access and Modernized Elections Act, Coloradans now have even more convenient options for voting and even more secure elections than ever before.

In this year's general election all active registered voters are sent a mail ballot. You sign it and return it by mail or at a ballot drop-off box. In fact, Boulder County now has three 24-hour ballot drop boxes along with many other designated daytime ballot drop-off locations.

For voters wanting the in-person voting experience, that process is even more convenient as well. Any voter can visit any Voter Service and Polling Center in Boulder County -- not just the location nearest to your home. Think of these voter centers as one-stop shops where you can vote in person, replace your ballot, register or change your address, use accessible voting machines and so on. Six Voter Service and Polling Center locations are currently open. By Election Day, 13 full service voting centers will be in operation. For your convenience, many locations have Saturday service from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 1.

For citizens who meet the 22-day residency requirement, same-day voter registration is now possible and very secure. For a same-day registrant, the state voter registration database is checked instantly to ensure the person registering is not already registered and has not already voted.

The new flexibility for Colorado voters -- from mail ballot voting to casting a ballot at any service center to same-day registration -- is only possible with advanced technology and security measures that ensure the integrity of elections. By linking post office, death and felony conviction records with voter registration information and driver's license information, our elections are becoming more efficient for voters and taxpayers without sacrificing security and accuracy.

Additionally, it is your signature that makes your vote count -- and that signature is well scrutinized. Bipartisan election judges are specially trained to spot signature discrepancies without ever seeing how you voted. No mail ballot is ever processed and counted without a bipartisan team of election judges verifying that the signature on your ballot envelope matches the signature on your voter registration records.

Every part of the election process is carefully planned and tested in the months leading up to the election. The mail ballot voting process and custody of chain of command of all ballots is done with bipartisan election judges and is carefully monitored. And when Election Day passes, the work is only half done. For 22 days after the election, election judges, staff and appointed party representatives pore through the reconciliation materials and audit the election technology to ensure the election was processed accurately.

Never before have elections been both more convenient and more secure for our citizens. And now it is up to you -- your ballot, your voice. Get out and vote!

Molly Tayer is the Boulder County Deputy Clerk for Elections. Her office telephone number is 303 413 7745.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4257Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Community Meeting Planned for Fourmile Creek Watershed Master PlanBoulder County, Colo. – The public is invited to a community meeting to learn about the Draft Fourmile Creek Watershed Master Plan, including how community input has been used and will be incorporated into the Final Plan. Feedback is specifically requested on reach-specific project alternatives. 

The Draft Plan will be posted for public review on the project website early the week of Nov. 3. Input can be provided at the meetings and submitted to the project team at fourmilemasterplan@mediate.org through Nov. 14. The Plan will be finalized in late-November.

For Lower Fourmile Creek residents
Wednesday, Nov. 5 - 5:30-7:30 PM 
Reaches 1 and 2 – Fourmile Creek from confluence with Boulder Creek to Mile Marker 4 (Upstream of Logan Mill Road)
Commissioners’ Hearing Room, 3rd Floor of the County Courthouse
1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

For Upper Fourmile Watershed residents
Thursday, Nov. 6 - 5:30-7:30 PM
Reaches 3 and 4 – Fourmile Creek from Mile Marker 4 to Sunset, and Gold Run from Salina Junction to Summerville
Alfalfa’s Community Room
1651 Broadway, Boulder

The Fourmile Creek Watershed Master Plan is being developed to help identify priority projects that will restore the creek corridor, reduce future flood risk, and restore the creek’s natural environment. Implementation will be dependent on funding.

A community kickoff meeting was held in early September to provide information and gather community input on focus areas for the Plan. Since then, the project team has studied the watershed and developed alternatives for the Plan. Community involvement has been critical to incorporating local needs of residents, property owners, and the broader public into long-term planning for recovery of the Fourmile Creek Watershed. 

For more information, visit the project website at www.fourmilemasterplan.com. Email comments or questions to fourmilemasterplan@mediate.org. The hotline for the Fourmile Creek Watershed Master Plan is 720-407-4789. 

Residents can contact the Fourmile Master Plan Project Manager, Kevin Doyle, with Michale Baker International, at 720-514-1102 or kdoyle@mbakerintl.com. The Left Hand Master Plan Public Involvement coordinator, Laura Sneeringer from CDR Associates can be reached at 720-407-4714 or lsneeringer@mediate.org. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4256Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Circles Campaign volunteer training in Lafayette on Nov. 1Boulder County, Colo. – Volunteer training for new Circles Allies is scheduled for Nov. 1. Circles is part of an innovative national campaign to end poverty in our community one family at a time. As part of its continued effort to help move individuals and families out of poverty and into a life of sustained self-sufficiency, Boulder County is recruiting volunteers to participate in the Circles Campaign.

The Circles Campaign provides a stable structure for people who are working their way out of poverty to receive guidance and support from mentors – called “allies” – to help them develop skills and access resources needed to work on their long range plans to move toward economic stability.

What: Volunteer training for those interested in joining the Circles Campaign
When: Saturday, Nov. 1, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Where: Sister Carmen Community Center, 655 Aspen Ridge Dr., Lafayette
RSVP: circlesinfo@bouldercounty.org  or 303-441-1503

The training is free and refreshments will be provided, but there is a suggested $15 donation to cover costs of training materials.

Circles Allies are asked to make an 18-month commitment, volunteering for 6-12 hours per month including two monthly meetings. For more information being an Ally please visit the Boulder County Circles website at www.BoulderCountyCircles.org and download an Ally job description.

For those wanting to be a part of the campaign but unable to make the Ally time commitment, other volunteers are needed for the program in Longmont, Lafayette and Boulder.

Please contact Jessica Austin at jaustin@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-1503 for more information.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4255Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Call Center Activated for Heil Valley Ranch Prescribed Burn Oct. 25, 26, & 27Members of the public are encouraged to call 303-413-7730 during the hours of 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. regarding the prescribed burn.

 

Boulder County, Colo. -  Boulder County Parks and Open Space and the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office Wildland Fire Management Program are conducting a prescribed burn at Heil Valley Ranch Open Space (near U.S. 36 and Lefthand Canyon Road) beginning Saturday, Oct. 25 and lasting up to five days, weather permitting. (Facts & Figures about the Wapiti prescribed burn)

 

Call Center

A public call center will be activated from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25, Sunday, Oct 26, and Monday, Oct 27. The hours for the call center were chosen based on the expected duration of fire ignitions which will increase the amount of smoke visible to area residents and visitors. Members of the public are encouraged to call 303-413-7730 during these hours with questions and for information regarding the prescribed burn.

 

Emergency calls should still be directed to 911, but the county’s emergency dispatch center is hoping to divert calls about the prescribed burn to the call center instead of 911 in order to keep channels open and available for reporting real emergencies.

 

Closures

Heil Valley Ranch Open Space will be closed from Saturday, Oct. 25 through Monday, Oct. 27. Specific areas will reopen as soon as it’s deemed safe to do so by fire personnel.

 

The Wapiti prescribed burn will cover approximately 150 acres and is located around the Wapiti and Ponderosa Loop Trails. (Map)

 

More Information

  • For information outside the call center hours, go to www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org or call 303-678-6211.
  • Follow Boulder County Parks and Open Space on Twitter and Facebook.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4251Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Area Agency on Aging to host 14th Annual Lavender Gala on Dec. 7Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Area Agency on Aging will host the 14th Annual Lavender Gala on Dec. 7 in Lafayette. The Lavendar Gala is a celebration for the Boulder County LGBTs (lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender) community age 60 and better and their friends, families and allies.

What: 14th Annual Lavender Gala
When: Sunday, Dec. 7, 1-4 p.m.
Where: Nissi’s Bistro, 2675 North Park Drive, Lafayette
Cost: $10 suggested donation at the door. No one turned away for lack of funds.
RSVP: Please RSVP by Wednesday, Dec. 3 to 303-441-1585 or http://lavendergala14.eventbrite.com 

Organizer Nancy Grimes says, "We particularly encourage those LGBTs who don’t get out much to attend this community event. We have much to celebrate, including increasing rights for our transgender community and same-sex marriage in a host of new states, including Colorado. The venue is accessible, there is plenty of parking and we’ll be done before it is dark.” 

Entertainment includes emcee Ms. Eda Bagel, comedian Nancy Norton, dance tunes by DJsusiepringle and special guests “Sing Out Louise” from the Denver Gay Men’s Chorus. Light hors d’oeuvres and soft drinks are included in the $10 suggested donation at the door; a cash bar is offered and there will be popular door prizes. Festive attire is encouraged.

For more information, to donate a door prize or to arrange a ride, call 303-441-3583 or email infoLGBTelders@bouldercounty.org

The event is hosted by Boulder County Area Agency on Aging and sponsored by Aging Services Foundation, the Open Door Fund of The Community Foundation Serving Boulder County, The David Ensign Charitable Fund, The Daily Camera, The Fairfield County Community Foundation-donor advised fund and Out Boulder.

For more information, contact Nancy Grimes at 303-441-3583 or ngrimes@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4250Thu, 23 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Clerk & Recorder to Conduct Election Wing Tour / Media Open House this WednesdayBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will conduct an in-depth Election Wing tour for interested media. Participants will be shown step-by-step what happens when a mail ballot is received and how it is securely processed. The tour will highlight key elements of our ballot processing system that protect the integrity of the voting process and election. Boulder County District Attorney Stan Garnett will be in attendance to discuss how potential cases of voter fraud are identified and why signing your ballot properly matters.

 

What:  Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Elections Wing Tour / Media Open House
 

When: Wednesday, October 22 – 12:30 – 2 p.m.

Who:  Hillary Hall, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder and Stan Garnett, Boulder County District Attorney

Where: 1750 33rd Street in Boulder – Attendees should check in at the Elections Office on the 2nd floor and will be escorted to the secure Elections Division Ballot Processing Wing. Please arrive promptly at 12:30 p.m.

The tour offers media the opportunity to see how ballots are processed, understand how issues of potential voter fraud are identified, learn about the role of official Election Watchers, and hear about how ballot resolution works among other ballot processing procedures and safeguards. Hall, along with Garnett, will be available to answer any questions after the tour. Participants will be able to observe workers processing ballots for the November General Election.

 

In order to accommodate everyone, please RSVP to MWozniak@BoulderCounty.org if you are planning to attend. Please include in your RSVP whether you plan on filming part or all of the tour.

 

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4249Tue, 21 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Returning your Ballot in the Mail – What Postage is NeededAll active registered voters in Colorado automatically receive a ballot in the mail. Depending on the election, the size and length of the ballot can vary and thus the postage rates on the return envelope vary.  


In this year’s voter instructions, the directions for voters with a two-page ballot had the incorrect postage amount off by 1¢. However, all voters should rest assured that their ballot is always delivered to our office. Any time there is any discrepancy between the amount of postage the voter puts on the ballot return envelope and the amount of postage due, our office covers the difference and always has. Ballots will never be returned for incorrect postage.


Additionally, voters have the option to return their ballot postage-free at any one of the three new 24-hour ballot drop boxes or at any Voter Service and Polling Center throughout the county. Locations are included in the mail ballot packet and listed online.


Please visit our 2014 General Election page for more information on this year’s election including links to ballot content, the official TABOR notice, and more.


- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk – 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4248Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Public Hearing on Oil & Gas Development in Unincorporated Boulder County - Monday, Nov. 10 - 2 p.m., Longmont The County Commissioners will consider public input on whether to extend or otherwise amend the current temporary moratorium on Boulder County’s processing of applications for oil and gas development in the unincorporated County.

 

Online sign-ups for people interested in speaking at the hearing will open Monday, Oct. 27 at noon. Speaking slots will be assigned in the order received. Written comments may be submitted prior to hearing; the deadline to receive written comments is Friday, Nov. 7 by 2 p.m.

 

Boulder County, Colo. – The Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on Nov. 10 at the Plaza Event Center in Longmont to take public input on whether to extend or otherwise amend the current temporary moratorium on Boulder County’s processing of applications for oil and gas development in the unincorporated County which expires Jan. 1, 2015.  

 

Note: The commissioners will not make a decision at the Nov. 10 hearing. A public meeting has been scheduled for Thursday, November 13 at 9:30 a.m. in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room for deliberation on the Commissioners’ decision. No further public comment will be taken at that time.

 

What:       County staff will provide an update to the Board of County Commissioners on matters discussed in oil & gas development resolutions 2014-56 and 2013-55. Public testimony will be taken. No decision will be made by the Board of County Commissioners at this hearing.

 

When:      Monday, Nov. 10 beginning at 2 p.m. (hearing must conclude by midnight)

 

Where:    The Plaza Event Center, 1850 Industrial Circle, Longmont (behind the Best Western Plus Plaza Hotel) (map)

 

Online Sign-Ups

New! For this hearing the Commissioners’ Office will be administering a new online sign-up for anyone wishing to provide their comments in person. On Monday, Oct. 27 at noon an electronic sign-up forum for Individual Speakers and Pool Time groups will become available at http://bit.ly/BCoilgas.

 

Speakers signing up for Pooled Time will need to include the names and addresses for those people donating their time. Pool Time speakers can have a maximum of 10 minutes to speak (provided that a minimum of four people donate their time). Individual speakers will have 3 minutes each. Speakers will be listed in order of the time their submission is received and will be placed in a time slot starting at 2 p.m. The list of speakers will be available on the website for reference and planning purposes. Assigned time slots are approximate and speakers must be present when they are called to speak.

 

To speak early in the day, sign-up online or call the Commissioners’ Office to be added to the list. Anyone needing assistance adding their name to the list can call 303-441-3399 or stop by the Commissioners’ Office at 1325 Pearl St., 3rd Floor, between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

In-Person Sign-Ups

In-person sign-ups on Nov. 10 will be accepted, and those speakers will be added to the existing list of online sign-ups in the order received.

 

Written Comments

In order to be considered in time for the hearing, the Commissioners have requested that written comments be submitted by mail, in person to the Commissioners’ Office, or by e-mail to oilgascomment@bouldercounty.org by Friday, Nov. 7 at 2 p.m. Written comments will be accepted after the deadline, but may not be reviewed in time for the public hearing.

 

Mailing address:

Boulder County Commissioners’ Office

Oil/Gas Comments

PO Box 471

Boulder, CO 80306

 

For more information about the county’s role in oil and gas development, please visit the county’s Oil and Gas Development webpage.

 

-BoulderCounty.org-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4247Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Voter Service & Polling Centers in Boulder CountyBoulder County, Colo.  All active registered voters in Colorado now automatically receive a ballot in the mail. Elections in Colorado are conducted by mail ballot with select Voter Service and Polling Center locations available for those who need additional assistance or would like to vote in person.

 

Ballots have now been mailed to all active registered voters to the address listed on their voter registration. Residents who have not received a ballot are encouraged to contact the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office at Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org or by calling 303-413-7740. Ballots can be returned either by mail or at a designated drop-off location anytime up to 7 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 4.

 

Beginning Monday, Oct. 20, six Voter Service and Polling Centers will be available to service Boulder County voter needs. Locations are:

·         Boulder: County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street

·         Boulder: CU Campus – Recreation Center on Stadium Drive west of Folsom Street

·         Boulder: Wonderland Lake Trailhead (Foothills Nature Center), 4201 N Broadway Street

·         Lafayette: County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1376 Miners Drive

·         Longmont: County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 529 Coffman Street

·         Longmont: Fire Station #5, 617 Barberry Drive (Airport & Nelson Road)

 

Hours of operation at the above locations are as follows:

·         8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 20 – Friday, Oct. 24

·         9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 25

·         8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27 – Friday, Oct. 31

·         9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 1

·         8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 3             

·         7 a.m. – 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4 (Election Day)

 

Boulder County voters can visit a Voter Service and Polling Center to:

·         Drop off a ballot

·         Cast a ballot in person

·         Request a replacement ballot

·         Register to vote or update voter registration information

·         Vote using equipment and facilities for persons with disabilities

 

In addition to the above locations, seven more Voter Service and Polling Center locations will be available on Monday, Nov. 3 and Tuesday, Nov. 4. Mail ballot packets include detailed information on all Voter Service and Polling Center locations as well as information on additional ballot drop-off locations – including Boulder County’s three new 24-hour drop box locations.

 

For new voters, or those who would like to update their information, voter registration for most residents can be done conveniently online at GoVoteColorado.com. This should be done no later than Monday, Oct. 27 in order to be issued a mail ballot. After Oct. 27, a person can register online and vote in the upcoming election, but will need to visit a Voter Service and Polling Center in person in order to request a ballot.

 

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content or find more information about the election. 

 

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4246Sat, 18 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Prescribed burn completed at Heil Valley RanchOctober 30 Update: The prescribed burn has been completed. The park is now open. Park visitors are required to stay on trail in the burn area. There are signs indicating the section of the Ponderosa Loop that is on-trail use only. Crews will remain on site 24/7 for mop up and monitoring through Sunday, November 2.

Accomplishments:
  • Over a span of five days the Boulder County Fire Management Program along with Boulder County Parks and Open Space successfully and effectively reintroduced prescribed fire to 32 acres of a ponderosa/grass ecosystem at Heil Valley Ranch.

  • The goal of this project was to reduce the forest density and structure and help decrease the occurrence and impact from uncharacteristic wildfires and large scale insect and disease infestation.  

  • Over 400 firefighters from 20 local and state wide fire protection districts and agencies, including the City of Boulder Wildland Division and Lefthand Fire Protection District, provided resources throughout the duration of the project.
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Boulder County, Colo. -- Boulder County Parks and Open Space and the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office Wildland Fire Management Program are conducting a prescribed burn at Heil Valley Ranch on Oct. 25, weather permitting. The park will be closed completely Sat., Oct. 25, through Mon., Oct. 27, and possibly longer. Specific areas will reopen as soon as it’s deemed safe to do so by fire personnel. (Facts & figures about the Wapiti prescribed burn)

The Wapiti prescribed burn will cover approximately 150 acres and is located around the Wapiti and Ponderosa Loop Trails (map)

Closures
  • Heil Valley Ranch will be closed during active ignition days; specific areas will reopen as soon as it’s deemed safe to do so by fire personnel. Active ignition operation will take three to five days.
    • The Picture Rock Trail will open as soon as active ignitions are completed; trail users must turn around at the junction with the Wild Turkey Trail.
    • The south side of Heil, which includes the Lichen Loop, Wapiti Trail, Ponderosa Loop and Wild Turkey Loop, will reopen as soon as it’s deemed safe to do so by fire personnel. Pyrite Way neighborhood access will open at this same time.
  • Park visitors will be required to stay on-trail in the burn area during mop up operations.  
Notification and Updates
Possible implementation includes all days Oct. 25 to Nov. 5. The first attempt will be on Oct. 25. Public notification of each attempt will be released 48 hours prior to ignition. Updates will be sent out as conditions warrant:
Staffing
  • Boulder County Parks and Open Space, Boulder County Sheriff’s Office Fire Management, along with numerous local and federal fire departments will be conducting the burn. The Wapiti prescribed burn is located in the Lyons and Lefthand Fire Protection Districts.
  • There will be fire crews on scene 24 hours per day performing mop-up operations and monitoring fire conditions until the fire is called out. 
Smoke Issues:
  • During a prescribed burn, smoke is generated and will drift according to wind currents and other atmospheric conditions. 
  • Smoke could settle in areas at night when cooler air traps the smoke particles closer to the surface of the ground. 
  • Smoke will be visible from Foothills Highway, Lyons, Boulder, Estes Park, Loveland and possibly east to I-25.
  • Children, older adults and people with heart or lung disease are more likely to be effected by smoke.
  • Close windows and stay indoors if you are concerned.

What are the benefits of prescribed fire?

·         Reduces hazardous fuels, protecting human communities from extreme fires.

·         Minimizes the spread of pest insects and disease.

·         Removes unwanted species that threaten species native to an ecosystem.

·         Provides habitat for foraging wildlife.

·         Improves habitat for threatened and endangered species.

·         Recycles nutrients back to the soil.

·         Promotes the growth of trees, wildflowers, and other plants.

What are the goals? 

·         Reintroduce fire as a disturbance mechanism to an area that is dependent on this natural process for long term sustainability.

·         Reduce the density of some forest stands to a density and structure range that decreases the occurrence and impact from uncharacteristic wildfires and large scale insect and disease infestations.

·         Maintain a mosaic of stand density, size and age for vegetation types, particularly coniferous forests and woodlands and foothill shrub lands.

·         Restore natural meadow systems by reducing invasion of conifers.

·         Retain and perpetuate old-growth forests and woodlands.

What about the wildlife?

·         It is past the breeding season for migratory birds, and months before owls begin nesting. Bird species that stay here during winter are mobile, and can move out of the burn area.

·         Large mammals such as deer and elk are very mobile, and can move out of the area. The human activity in the area prior to ignition will likely cause the animals to move. 

·         Smaller mammals such as bobcat, fox, skunk and raccoon will be able to move out of the area or use rocky outcrops and dens, since these to not burn. 

·         Areas of high wildlife value and adjacent forest stands were removed from the burn area to ensure there will still be nearby habitat for these species.

·         Since a lot of ground maintenance has been done to guide fire behavior and promote more understory and ground fire rather than an intense crown fire, a lot of unburned areas are likely. Animals like squirrels should be able to find refuge in standing trees.

·         Snakes and lizards reduce activity during this time of year, and typically are already taking cover in burrows, under rocks and in rocky outcrops.

·         Steps have been taken to create wildlife habitat, such as tree snags for bats and bird species, as part of this event.

 
Would you ever consider stop burning once you have started?

  •       Yes. Burning is stopped if weather conditions change and don’t allow for a safe operation (gusty winds), or the situation becomes unsafe. Personnel on the burn monitor this constantly.

What will I expect after the fire is out?

  •         Residual smoke may be visible.
  •         Heil Valley Ranch may be closed during the days afterwards for public safety.
  •         There will be fire crews on scene 24 hours a day performing mop up operations and monitoring fire conditions until the fire is called out.
  •         There are also monitoring plots for important data gathering. These plots were studied before the fire, and researchers will return after the     fire to document scientific changes.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4220Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Colorado Attorney General Drops Challenge to Marriage LicensesColorado Attorney General Drops Challenge to Marriage Licenses

Action signals validation of same-sex marriage licenses prior to October 6

 

Boulder CountyColorado Attorney General John Suthers asked a Boulder court to dismiss his challenges to the validity of same-sex marriage licenses issued by Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall. When the Tenth Circuit Court of appeals found Utah’s ban on same-sex marriages unconstitutional, Clerk Hall immediately began issuing same-sex marriage licenses. Suthers filed a lawsuit against Clerk Hall seeking to stop issuance of the licenses and asking the court to declare that the licenses already issued were void.

 

Yesterday, Suthers filed a motion in Boulder District Court asking the court to dismiss all of his claims against Clerk Hall. Despite his earlier arguments that the licenses were invalid, his request for dismissal includes claims regarding the validity of the previously issued licenses. Suthers states, “same-sex marriages are now recognized in Colorado . . . Accordingly, Plaintiffs’ claims against Clerk Hall are moot.”

 

Clerk Hall applauded Suther’s decision to drop the case. “All of the licenses I’ve issued to same-sex couples were valid when issued and they remain valid. Same-sex couples have been through enough already and they shouldn’t be required to take any additional action on their licenses.”

 

Suthers previously stated that same-sex couples married before October 6, 2014, should consider getting another license. However, “the Attorney General has now acknowledged that his authority does not extend to determining the validity of any couple’s marriage,” said Deputy County Attorney David Hughes.  

 

“We are incredibly pleased with Attorney General Suther’s dismissal,” stated Hall. “His action to dismiss should clear up any remaining doubts on the issue.”

 

Boulder District Court Judge Andrew Hartman is expected to rule on Suther’s motion to dismiss his claims against Clerk Hall within the next several weeks.

 

-  http://www.bouldercounty.org/dept/clerkrecorder -

-  On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4240Wed, 15 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Receives Additional Assistance for Homeless VeteransVASH program has helped reduced homelessness for Boulder County veterans by 40%

Boulder County, Colo. – As many as 25 additional homeless veterans in Boulder County will soon receive stable housing as a result of a new funding award from the federal government. 

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has given the Boulder County Department of Housing and Human Services (BCDHHS) the award in the form of housing vouchers worth about $182,000 per year. The Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) program provides rental assistance and help with life skills, healthcare, and other transitional supports for homeless veterans who qualify.

“We’re making such great progress reaching our homeless veterans,” said BCDHHS Housing Assistance Program Manager Amanda Guthrie. “With a little bit of help, these veterans get a real chance to step up and out of the challenges that have limited them.”

The numbers of homeless individuals in Boulder County have fallen in recent years. According to the 2014 Point In Time survey, Boulder County had about 850 homeless individuals, down from 2,366 in 2013 and 1,970 in 2012. Also in 2014, 48 of those who were homeless (5.6 percent) identified as veterans, down significantly from the 10 percent homeless veterans’ average in past years. Programs like VASH have helped in these reductions.

Veterans in the VASH program receive subsidies for rent that is beyond 30 percent of their income and intensive case management for other kinds of assistance. 

“This work is guided in part by Boulder County’s Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness,” said BCDHHS Director Frank Alexander. “By getting housing to the homeless and wrapping them in supportive services with prevention at the core, we’re helping ensure these neighbors have more stable and permanent solutions. Since 2012, the VASH program has been an important tool in our belt, since it provides immediate help as well as longer-term supports,” Alexander said.

In March 2012, BCDHHS was awarded 25 VASH vouchers, and 10 more were added in 2013. Boulder County quickly utilized the assistance, and today through the program 14 veterans are housed in Longmont, 11 in Boulder, 6 in Lafayette, and 1 in Nederland; 3 veterans are currently looking for housing with the remaining vouchers. The addition of 25 vouchers represents a 40 percent increase in VASH assistance for Boulder County.

Boulder County continues its strong partnership with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to implement the VASH program. For VASH, VA case managers identify eligible veterans and refer them to BCDHHS’ housing assistance specialists, who help the veterans find stable housing as well as form and maintain good relationships with landlords.

Through its rental assistance and wrap-around case management supports, VASH is helping veterans and their families avoid deeper, more devastating crisis.

Homeless off and on for years, U.S. Coast Guard veteran Jefferson LeSuer and his partner found housing in Longmont through the VASH program. He credits the stable housing that VASH provided with much of his partner’s success in overcoming both cancer and addiction. “If she would have had cancer on the street, I don’t think she would have survived,” he said. “That house is such a big reason why she was able to pull over the top on all she has gone through.” 

LeSuer is now spending three weeks in Arizona getting certified to drive tractor-trailers through a veterans’ training program provided by the Swift Company. He says by January he expects to be making enough money to graduate from the VASH program. Lesuer adds he is grateful for the support he has gotten from VASH to stabilize his life and learn job skills that will make it easier to sustain himself and his partner. “VASH is 98 percent of the reason I’m in such a good place now,” LeSuer says. “It’s been the bridge between where I was and where I need to be.”    

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4244Mon, 13 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Nederland and Allenspark Sort Yards Season Ends Oct. 18Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Community Sort Yard program, a free log and slash disposal service for residents, is in its final days of operation for the 2014 cutting season. Both the Nederland and Allenspark sort yards are scheduled to close at 5 p.m. on Saturday, October 18.

Residents can drop off tree branches, logs and yard waste (pine needles, cut grass, pine cones) free of charge at either sort yard location.
Nederland Sort Yard

This summer marks the seventh consecutive year that Boulder County has operated sort yards in the mountains, and has proven to be another very successful year of backyard forest management. By the end of August, more than 600 individuals dropped off more than 3,300 loads of material at both sort yards.

“The fall is the perfect time of year to be out on your land cutting. The weather is cool and bark beetles are less active,” said Ryan Ludlow, outreach forester with the county’s Land Use Department. “We hope mountain residents are able to take advantage of remaining days of operation. We typically see a major uptick in usage as we approach closing day.”

Allenspark/Meeker Park Area Sort Yard - 8200 Hwy 7, Allenspark
  • Last Day Open is Saturday, Oct. 18
  • Hours of Operation: Wednesday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Nederland Area Sort Yard - 291 Ridge Road, Nederland 
  • Last Day Open is Saturday, Oct. 18
  • Hours of Operation: Wednesday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
For more information about the sort yard program or how to implement proactive wildfire mitigation on your land, contact Ryan Ludlow, Boulder County Forest Health Initiative outreach forester, at 720-564-2641 or rludlow@bouldercounty.org.

Both sort yards may have additional closures due to early season snowfall. To check the operational status, please call 303-678-6368.


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4235Tue, 07 Oct 2014 10:00:00
General Election is less than a month awayGeneral Election less than a month away
Ballots to arrive in homes week of October 13

Boulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division wants to remind voters that the General Election is less than a month away. Elections in Colorado are conducted by mail with select Voter Service and Polling Centers for those who would like additional assistance or prefer to vote in person. All active registered voters will be automatically mailed a ballot to the address on their voter registration record the week of October 13.
 
The mail ballot packets include a detailed list of ballot drop-off points and service centers that will be open to the public prior to Election Day on Tuesday, November 4. Additionally, voters may return their ballot as soon as they receive them. For the public’s convenience, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder has added three 24-hour ballot drop boxes (locations online and listed on the voter instructions) that open October 14.
 
The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder encourages all interested potential voters to register or check their registration to ensure that their mailing address is correct. If you moved recently or provided an alternative address during a past election (due to travel or other circumstances for absentee voting), our office may not have your most current address. Voters can register or check their registration details at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
Additionally, while eligible voters may register up to and including Election Day (22-day residency required), the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office encourages everyone to register early in order to ensure that they receive their mail ballot in a timely fashion. Voters who register or change their registration after October 27 must request a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Poling Center.
 
Key Dates for the 2014 General Election:
 
•Tuesday, October 14:
   o Ballots begin to arrive in homes
   o Voting Begins!
   o Select Ballot Drop-off locations open. All voting services available at Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s  office in         Boulder starting October 14
   o Three 24-hour Ballot Drop Box locations open and  remain open until 7pm on Election Day, Tuesday,  November 4
Monday, October  20: 6 Voter Service and Polling Centers open (check website for locations)
• Friday, October 31: All Ballot Drop-off locations open (check website for locations)
• Monday, November  3: 7 additional Voter Service and Polling Centers open (Check website for locations)
• Tuesday, November 4: Election Day. All ballots must be received at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder office or a designated Drop-off/Voter Service and Polling Center by 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4230Mon, 06 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Caregiving Expert Wendy Lustabader to Speak Oct. 23Boulder County, Colo. – Nationally recognized expert in the fields of aging and caregiving, Wendy Lustbader, MSW, will present “A Prescription for Caregivers: Take Care of Yourself,” on Oct. 23. This presentation will show family caregivers—and professionals who work with them—how to make life better for the giver and receiver of care. 

Topics will include heeding resentment as a warning of doing too much, the many varieties of guilt, options for self-care, figuring out how much care is “enough” and the importance of humor.

What: A Prescription for Caregivers: Take Care of Yourself
When: Thursday, Oct. 23, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. (Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.)
Where: Longmont Senior Center, 910 Longs Peak Avenue, Longmont
Details: Registration is open and free to Boulder County residents who provide care for older loved ones and to professionals who serve caregivers. Pre-registration is requested, at 303-678-6116 or infocaregiver@bouldercounty.org. Financial assistance for respite care (substitute elder care) may be available to caregivers.

Lustbader, a popular speaker at conferences throughout the continent, is a skilled social worker, teacher, and author of Taking Care of Aging Family Members (with Nancy Hooyman), Counting on Kindness, What’s Worth Knowing and Life Gets Better. Her insightful presentations are filled with amusing and touching stories from her many years of service to older adults, family caregivers and others.

This presentation is co-sponsored by Boulder County Area Agency on Aging (a division of Community Services), Friends of the Longmont Senior Center, Seniors of Louisville Advisory Board, AltaVita Assisted Living Memory Care Centre, HomeCare of the Rockies, Homewatch CareGivers of Boulder County and Life Care of Longmont.

For more information please contact Emily Cooper, at ecooper@bouldercounty.org or 303-678-6116.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4227Fri, 03 Oct 2014 10:00:00
County Commissioners to Consider 2015 Budget Requests Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Commissioners will hold public hearings throughout the month of October to consider 2015 budget requests from all county departments and elected offices. Members of the public are invited to comment after each department head’s or elected official’s budget presentation at the following budget hearings: *

 
  • Thursday, Oct. 2 at 3:30 p.m. – Clerk & Recorder (Elections, Motor Vehicle, and Recording)
  • Tuesday, Oct. 7 at 9:30 a.m.  – Treasurer
  • Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 9:30 a.m.  –Commissioners’ Office, Surveyor
  • Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 2 p.m. – Sheriff, Coroner, St. Vrain Building Project
  • Thursday, Oct. 16 at 11 a.m.  – Parks & Open Space, Land Use
  • Thursday, Oct. 23 at 2 p.m. – Nederland Area Eco-Pass Public Improvement District, Imagine!, Public Health, Mental Health Partners/Addiction Recovery Center, Non-Profit Emergency Services Groups
  • Tuesday, Oct. 28 at 9:30 a.m.  – Transportation
  • Tuesday, Oct. 28 at 11 a.m.  – Assessor, Community Services, District Attorney
  • Tuesday, Oct. 28 at 2 p.m. – Housing & Human Services, Integrated Treatment Court, Administrative Services

  

The County Commissioners will conduct their 2015 Budget Work Session, where they direct the Budget Office to prepare a 2015 draft budget, from 2-4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 6. The public is invited to attend the work session, but no public testimony will be taken.

 

The Budget Office will present the draft 2015 budget for public comment on Tuesday, Nov. 18 at 11 a.m., and the final 2015 budget will be adopted on Thursday, Dec. 11 at 11 a.m.

 

The budget work session and all public hearings will take place in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room on the 3rd floor of the Boulder County Courthouse at 1325 Pearl St. in Boulder. The meetings will be webstreamed “live” and archived for future viewing at www.bouldercounty.org/gov/meetings/pages/hearings.aspx.

 

Public comments may be submitted at any time by email to: commissioners@bouldercounty.org, by mail to: Boulder County Commissioners’ Office, P.O. Box 471, Boulder, CO 80306, or by phone at: 303-441-3500.

 

Information about current and prior years’ budgets is available at: www.BoulderCounty.org/Budget.

 

 

*Please note: While the Budget Office seeks to maintain a set schedule for all public hearings, these dates and times are subject to change. Please check the county calendarfor any updated meeting times/dates.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4226Wed, 01 Oct 2014 10:00:00
Circles Campaign volunteer training in Longmont on Oct. 11Boulder County, Colo. –Volunteer training for new Circles Allies is scheduled for Oct. 11. Circles is part of an innovative national campaign to end poverty in our community one family at a time. As part of its continued effort to help move individuals and families out of poverty and into a life of sustained self-sufficiency, Boulder County is recruiting volunteers to participate in the Circles Campaign.

The Circles Campaign provides a stable structure for people who are working their way out of poverty to receive guidance and support from mentors – called “allies” – to help them develop skills and access resources needed to work on their long range plans to move toward economic stability.

What: Volunteer training for those interested in joining the Circles Campaign
When: Saturday, Oct. 11, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Where: Spruce Street Building, 2160 Spruce St., Boulder
RSVP: circlesinfo@bouldercounty.org  or 303-441-1503

The training is free and refreshments will be provided, but there is a suggested $15 donation to cover costs of training materials.

Circles Allies are asked to make an 18-month commitment, volunteering for 6-12 hours per month including two monthly meetings. For more information being an Ally please visit the Boulder County Circles website at www.bouldercountycircles.org and download an Ally job description.

For those wanting to be a part of the campaign but unable to make the Ally time commitment, other volunteers are needed for the program in Longmont, Lafayette and Boulder.

Please contact Jessica Austin at jaustin@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-1503 for more information.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4225Thu, 02 Oct 2014 10:00:00
St. Vrain Creek Master Plan recovery alternatives available for review and commentBoulder County, Colo. – Michael Baker Jr., Inc., the St. Vrain Creek Coalition’s master plan consultant team, has released a draft alternatives analysis report for flood recovery and restoration projects for the St. Vrain Creek Watershed. The public is invited to provide input on the draft alternatives. Approximately 140 people attended four community workshops to provide feedback on the draft alternatives. 

The draft report includes:
  • Alternatives Analysis: Comparison of alternatives that address the objectives, opportunities, and constraints for each reach of the creek. Alternatives are generally focused on reducing flood risk and restoring natural channel conditions through creek realignment, bank stabilization, and erosion repair.
  • Ecological Assessment:  Evaluation of the overall condition of streams, riparian zones, and in-stream habitat.  Recommendations from this assessment are focused on strategies to re-establish or improve the ecosystem throughout the channel corridor.
  • Geomorphic Assessment: Evaluation of the physical characteristics of the channel and how the channel has changed shape over time.  Recommendations from this assessment provide guidance on where the channel should be placed and how it should be shaped for long-term stability.

Those who were unable to attend the community workshops can view the draft alternatives online at the St. Vrain Creek Master Plan website. Comments on the draft alternatives analysis report will be accepted until Oct. 3, 2014. The final plan will be released in early November. 

“We will be taking the input we received from the community and use it to further inform the draft alternatives analysis to determine the recommendations for flood recovery projects within the St. Vrain Creek Watershed,” said Dave Jula, St. Vrain Creek Watershed Master Plan Project Manager, for Michael Baker Jr., Inc. 

As the master plan nears completion, conversations have begun to discuss post-master plan coordination and project implementation with local agencies, landowners, and stakeholders. Project implementation will be dependent upon securing funding for projects. 

“The completion of the master plan will be a big step forward for the recovery of the St. Vrain Creek. But there is much work to be done to implement the projects identified in the master plan,” said Julie McKay, Boulder County Creek Planning Program Manager. “Long-term recovery of St. Vrain Creek depends on participation from landowners, residents, and other stakeholders.”

Similar master planning efforts are underway for many other watersheds in Boulder County, including Left Hand Creek, the Little Thompson River, and Fourmile Creek. For more information on any of the master plans, please contact Stacey Proctor, Communications Specialist at 303-441-1107 or sproctor@bouldercounty.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4221Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County to test ballots and equiptment for upcoming electionBoulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming election
Logic and Accuracy Test to take place beginning October 7
 
Boulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division will conduct a logic and accuracy test beginning on Tuesday, October 7 on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2014 General Election.
 
The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public.
 
What: Logic and Accuracy Testing – Testing of ballots and equipment for upcoming election
When: Begins 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, October 7; Testing typically takes a minimum of 1 work day. After the first day, testing runs from 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. each day until complete.
Where: Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street in Boulder                           
Visitors will need to check in at the front desk of the Elections Office, Suite 200, to be escorted to the test area.
 
After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
 
Key Dates for the 2014 General Election:
 
• Tuesday, October 14:  
  o  Ballots begin to arrive in homes this week
  o  Voting Begins!
  o  Select Ballot Drop-off locations open. All voting services available at Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office in Boulder         starting October 14
  o Three 24-hour Ballot Drop Box locations open and  remain open until 7pm on Election Day, Tuesday,  November 4
• Monday, October  20: 6 Voter Service and Polling Centers open (check website for locations)
• Friday, October 31: All Ballot Drop-off locations open (check website for locations)
• Monday, November  3: 7 additional Voter Service and Polling Centers open (Check website for locations)
• Tuesday, November 4: Election Day. All ballots must be received at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder office or a designated  Drop-off/Voter Service and Polling Center by 7 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, November 4.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org –

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4219Mon, 29 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County recruiting now for People Engaged in Raising Leaders Boulder County, Colo. - In an effort to increase the number of people of color on boards and commissions, Boulder County Community Action Programs has developed People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL). PERL is a training program educating individuals from Boulder County’s diverse communities about the inner-workings of boards and commissions. Participants learn about leadership development, communication styles, budgeting, fundraising and more. 

People of color interested in civic engagement across Boulder County are invited to register for the PERL training program. This ten-week session will focus on connecting our communities with non-profit organizations and commissions ready to embrace inclusion.  

What: PERL Fall 2014 Training Program: Board Leadership Training 
When: Wednesdays, Oct. 8 – Dec. 17, 10 sessions 
Where: Longmont Community Foundation, 636 Coffman St., Suite 203, Longmont
Who: Boulder County Residents 
Cost:  Free

People Engaged in Raising Leaders came about as a result of the inclusiveness work The Community Foundation was doing with non-profit organizations. Results from one of their surveys spoke to the need for more people of color to be on Boards and Commissions. 

The pool of diverse residents interested in participating on boards and commissions is low. The PERL program aims to change this statistic to allow more board positions to be filled. Through increased outreach, training efforts, and collaborations, the PERL program will help fill a niche that truly represents the diversity that exists in Boulder County.

To register or receive more information, contact Susana Lopez-Baker at slopez-baker@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-3956.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4215Mon, 22 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Louisville Resident Tests Positive for Tularemia After Exposure to Dead RabbitBoulder Count, Colo. – A Louisville resident has tested positive for tularemia after exposure to a dead rabbit while walking with her dog near Coyote Run Open Space in Louisville. The resident had a small cut on her knee, where the tularemia bacteria are thought to have entered her body.

The resident was seen by multiple doctors after experiencing swollen lymph nodes, abdominal pain, and pain in the front of her knee. She developed a high fever, headache, and general malaise and was admitted to the hospital. Her condition has greatly improved, and she is recovering at home.

This is the second Boulder County resident to test positive for the tularemia this year; nine people have tested positive for the disease in Colorado. In most of the cases, people were exposed to the disease while participating in outdoor activities, such as mowing or recreating in areas where sick or dead wildlife were present.

Boulder County Public Health officials will be posting warning signs in the area to alert residents of the risks of tularemia.

“Illness from tularemia can be very painful and often requires care in the hospital, “said Jamie Feld, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease Control epidemiologist. “The best protection is prevention.”

People become infected with tularemia through skin contact with infected animal tissue or through the bite of infected insects, most commonly ticks and deer flies. The bacteria can also be inhaled when infected animal tissue is broken up into small particles and spread in the air, such as when an infected carcass is mowed over.

“This is a reminder of how important it is to avoid touching wildlife,” said Marshall Lipps, Boulder County Public Health environmental health specialist. “Because of the wet weather, we’re seeing a lot more animal and rodent activity. With more animals and rodents in our environment, it’s more likely that some of them will carry disease.”

Symptoms of tularemia include an abrupt onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint pain, dry cough, difficulty breathing, bloody sputum, and respiratory failure. Symptoms also include skin ulcers, swollen and painful lymph glands, inflamed eyes, sore throat, mouth sores, diarrhea, or pneumonia. Tularemia is treatable when detected early.

Tularemia is often overlooked as a diagnosis because it is rare, and the symptoms are similar to other diseases. Public health officials recommend that anyone who becomes ill after possible exposure to a sick or dead animal should ask their health care providers about the possibility of tularemia.

Public health officials recommend the following precautions:

  • Avoid all contact with wild animals or rodents, including squirrels and rabbits; do not feed or handle them. If an animal must be moved, place it in a garbage bag using a long-handled shovel, and place the bag in an outdoor garbage can.
  • Do not wear sandals or walk barefoot in an area where animals have been seen sick or dead. The tularemia bacteria can persist in the environment, such as soil and water, for several months after it is detected.
  • Stay out of areas inhabited by wild animals or rodents. If you must enter areas frequented by wild rodents, always wear insect repellent that is effective against ticks, biting flies, and mosquitoes and contains DEET or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • Do not mow over animal carcasses, and consider using a dust mask when doing landscape work.
  • Prevent pets from hunting or eating wild rodents or rabbits. Infected pets, such as cats, may in turn transmit the disease to people. Contact a veterinarian if a pet becomes ill with a high fever and/or swollen lymph nodes.

Nineteen animals (16 rabbits, 1 vole, 1 mouse, 1 cat) have tested positive for the disease in Colorado this year; 4 animals tested positive in 2013.

In the United States, human cases of tularemia have been reported from every state except Hawaii, with the majority occurring in south-central and western states.

For more information about tularemia, visit www.cdc.gov/tularemia.

To report an animal die-off (two or more animals found in the same area at the same time) in Boulder County, call 303-441-1564.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4212Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Applications for zero waste program funding now availableBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Resource Conservation Division is allocating $50,000 for its 2015 Zero Waste Funding Program and applications are now being accepted. Proposals must be received at the Resource Conservation Division office by Monday, Nov. 3, 2014 at noon to be considered. Project funding will begin in January 2015.

Zero Waste Funding initiatives provide an opportunity for businesses, organizations and individuals within our community to contribute to Boulder County’s long-term vision of moving toward Zero Waste. This vision is outlined in Boulder County’s Zero Waste Action Plan. In addition to the programs supported in prior years, Boulder County is encouraging programs with an emphasis on demonstrated resource diversion (new tons diverted from disposal) for businesses, residents and governmental buildings. Applications will be accepted and considered for programs that fall outside of this limited focus.

A pre-proposal workshop is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct.8, from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. in the Education Room, at the Boulder County Recycling Center, 1901 63rd St., Boulder. Attendance is required for all applicants who have not received funding in the past, and highly encouraged for all other applicants. The workshop will provide answers to questions about the program and the application process, as well as other details. 

The minimum funding amount available for a project is $1,000, with a maximum of $10,000. Local governments, non-profit organizations, school districts, schools, private companies and individuals may apply as long as the scope of work will be completed within Boulder County or the City and County of Broomfield and so long as all insurance requirements are met.

To obtain an application or to get more information, email Mark Wesson at mwesson@bouldercounty.org or call 720-564-2725.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4211Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Public open house on permanent repairs to Lefthand Canyon Drive and James Canyon Drive set for Sept. 17Public feedback on plans will be collected

Boulder County and its engineering consultant, AECOM, will provide a presentation and collect feedback regarding permanent repairs to Lefthand Canyon Drive and James Canyon Drive at an open house from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., at the Altona Grange, 9386 N. 39th Street. The meeting is open to anyone who’d like to learn more about the projects and provide input on their designs. 

After the meeting, the county and AECOM will incorporate the public’s comments, as appropriate, into the final designs of permanent repairs to these two canyon roads, which are anticipated to begin in 2015/2016. 

Members of the public do not need to attend the meeting to submit input. For those unable to attend, the county encourages them to comment by:


All public comments should be received no later than Wednesday, Oct. 1 in order to guarantee their consideration for this phase of design. The county will return to the public later this year or early next to share updated designs and to collect feedback on those as well. 

For more information on the project, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4206Tue, 09 Sep 2014 10:00:00
EnergySmart passes milestone of 12,000 local residents enrolledBoulder County, Colo. – EnergySmart enrolled its 12,000th residential customer as of the beginning of September, showing that even after the large Department of Energy grant ended, the service is providing large benefits to Boulder County residents. 

A new round of rebates for energy efficiency upgrades is now available to homes in all Boulder County communities. Residents are also eligible for discounted home energy assessments and up to four free dimmable LEDs. These offerings assist homeowners in identifying the most cost-effective home improvement opportunities in order to save energy, money and time.

What:  EnergySmart Rebates
Who:   Boulder County residents are eligible 
When:  Offer available until Sept. 30. Additional existing EnergySmart rebates will continue.
Details: To be eligible for the rebates, residents must speak with an EnergySmart     Advisor before beginning any upgrades. Discounts include:
    • Energy assessments for $135, including free quick installs 
    • Up to four dimmable LEDs (total value of $285)
    • Up to $400 in EnergySmart rebates for energy efficiency cooling upgrades
Energy efficiency cooling upgrades include insulation, air sealing, whole house fans, mini-split systems, evaporative coolers and air conditioning units. Rebate funding can be combined with low-interest Elevations Energy Loans to fully fund energy-related upgrades. 

EnergySmart is a suite of services offered to residents and businesses in all Boulder County communities to assist in making homes and businesses more energy efficient. Services include expert assistance from Home Energy Advisors, who help residents navigate the often-confusing world of energy assessments, contractors, and rebates and financing opportunities. To-date, advisors have helped participating residents with upgrades including insulation and air sealing, furnaces and window replacements. Upgrades performed through EnergySmart have resulted in almost $27 million being invested in the local economy.

Interested residents can find more information by calling an Energy Advisor at 303-544-1000, or by visiting www.EnergySmartYES.com.

The funding for these offerings is made possible by Boulder County, the City of Boulder Climate Action Plan (CAP) tax and the City of Longmont.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4205Tue, 09 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Elections Job FairLooking for a temporary job this fall?
Join the Boulder County Elections team on September 8 and 9 to learn about a variety of temporary positions available for the General Election on November 4, 2014.
 
What: The Boulder County Elections Job Fair
When: Monday, September 8, 2 p.m. – 6 p.m.; Tuesday, September 9, 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Where: Boulder County Clerk and Recorder, 1750 33rd St., Houston Room
 
If you would like more information, please visit the Temporary Election Positions page on our website.  Please pass along to family and friends!
 
Remember: All other Boulder County offices are closed on Election Day, November 4. Want to make a little extra money and watch democracy in action? Join the elections team! Unable to attend the job fair? Please email Sydney Power at spower@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4203Fri, 05 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Flood Quilt Commemoration scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 9Flood Quilt Commemoration 

The Boulder County Bold & Beautiful Commemorative Flood Quilt will be hung in a dedication ceremony at the Boulder County Courthouse, 1325 Pearl St., Boulder on Sept. 9 at 9:30 a.m.  The public is invited to attend.

The quilt was created from materials received from quilters in seven states, including California, Colorado, Iowa, Minnesota, North Carolina and Tennessee. Quilters who submitted blocks were asked to adhere to a predetermined color scheme and the general theme, "Boulder County: Strong & Beautiful." The quilters also wrote descriptions of their work that will be included in a project book to be displayed at the courthouse. 

The quilt is intended to commemorate the one year anniversary of the 2013 Flood that occurred in Boulder County and the incredible resiliency of our community. The quilt will be on permanent display in the courthouse. 

More details about the quilt can be found at http://bit.ly/BoCoQuilt

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4202Fri, 05 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Longmont Resident and Animals in Boulder Test Positive for TularemiaBoulder, CO – A child from Longmont and two animals in Boulder have tested positive for tularemia. This is the first Boulder County resident to test positive for the disease since 2007.

The Longmont resident was tested for the disease after visiting the emergency room with a high fever. The resident is expected to recover fully after receiving intravenous antibiotics while hospitalized. In July, two residents from neighboring Broomfield and Larimer counties also tested positive for the disease.

A vole collected near Foothills Parkway and Table Mesa Drive and a mouse collected near Jay Road on North 75th Street on August 28, 2014 are the first animals to test positive for tularemia in Boulder County this year. Both animals were collected on August 28, 2014.

Boulder County Public Health officials will be posting warning signs in the area to alert residents of the risks of tularemia.

Tularemia is caused by the bacteria Francisella tularensis and is typically found in animals, especially rodents, rabbits, and hares. People become infected with tularemia through the bite of infected insects, most commonly ticks and deer flies, or through skin contact with infected animal tissue. The bacteria can also be inhaled when infected animal tissue is broken up into small particles and spread in the air, such as when an infected carcass is mowed over.

“It’s always important to avoid contact with wild animals because of the risk of many diseases, said Lane Drager, Boulder County Public Health Consumer Protection program coordinator. “Now that we’re seeing tularemia in both animals and humans, and in neighboring counties, it’s more important than ever.”

Symptoms of tularemia include skin ulcers, swollen and painful lymph glands, inflamed eyes, sore throat, mouth sores, diarrhea, or pneumonia. Symptoms can also include abrupt onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint pain, dry cough, difficulty breathing, bloody sputum, and respiratory failure. Tularemia is treatable when detected in early stages.

Public health officials recommend the following precautions:

  • Stay out of areas inhabited by wild rodents. If you must enter areas frequented by wild rodents, always wear insect repellent that is effective against ticks, biting flies, and mosquitoes and contains DEET or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • Do not go barefoot in an area where rabbits have died. The tularemia bacteria can persist in the environment for several months after it is detected.
  • Don’t mow over animals carcasses, and consider using a dust mask when doing landscape work.
  • Consider wearing a dust mask when mowing or blowing vegetation in areas where animal die-offs have occurred.
  • Prevent your pets from hunting or eating wild rodents or rabbits. Infected pets such as cats may in turn transmit the disease to people.
  • Avoid all contact with wild rodents, including squirrels and rabbits; do not feed or handle them.
  • Avoid ticks. The best protection for pets, especially cats, is to keep them indoors. If outdoors with pets, keep them out of heavily wooded areas, which are ideal habitats for ticks.
  • Never touch sick or dead animals with your bare hands. If an animal must be moved, move it safely.
  • Avoid drinking unpurified water from streams or lakes; keep your pets from doing the same.
  • See a health care provider if you become ill with a high fever and/or swollen lymph nodes. Tularemia is a treatable illness when diagnosed early.
  • Contact a veterinarian if your pet becomes ill with a high fever and/or swollen lymph nodes.

Sixteen animals have tested positive for the disease in Colorado this year; four animals tested positive in 2013.

In the United States, human cases of tularemia have been reported from every state except Hawaii, with the majority occurring in south-central and western states.

Learn More About Tularemia

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4201Thu, 04 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Allstate Becomes First Insurance Company to Accept Wildfire Partners CertificateBoulder County, Colo. – Allstate Insurance has announced their support for the Boulder County Wildfire Partners’ initiative by being the first insurance company to accept the certificate for customers who complete the program. In addition, Allstate Insurance will serve on the program’s advisory committee in order to collaborate with the program continuously.

 

To receive a Wildfire Partners Certificate, participating homeowners must perform required mitigation measures and “pass” their follow-up inspection.

 

“Allstate Insurance is excited to be the first insurance company to recognize the Wildfire Partners Certificate,” said Jeff Thompson, Field Senior Vice President. “Allstate reviewed mitigation requirements and participated in Wildfire Partner assessments, and we were impressed with all aspects of the program.”

 

Allstate Insurance anticipates that with their support, the Wildfire Partners Certificate can serve as a model for surrounding communities who will benefit from their experience and expertise.

 

“We made this decision based on a careful examination of the program,” Thompson added. “As an insurance company, Allstate understands the risks associated with wildfires and hopes that mitigation efforts can limit the effects of theses natural disasters.”

 

“Wildfire Partners is extremely pleased that Allstate is recognizing our certificate,” said Jim Webster, Wildfire Partners Program Coordinator. “Allstate is an industry leader when it comes to recognizing wildfire risk. They put the Wildfire Partners under a microscope and liked what they saw. The fact that Allstate is the first company to make this determination means a great deal to everyone who has worked so hard to make this program a success.”

 

After making it through a competitive application process, five hundred homeowners in Western Boulder County are participating in Wildfire Partners. Their participation includes:

 

1.      A comprehensive, detailed, on-site assessment with a Wildfire Mitigation Specialist

2.      An exhaustive report explaining how to mitigate the property and reduce wildfire risk

3.      Implementation of mitigation actions identified during their assessments and in their reports

4.      Participation in a follow up inspection with the specialists

5.      Receive their Wildfire Partners Certificate and program rebates once they pass their inspection.

 

The Wildlife Partners Program hopes to ease the concerns of homeowners by integrating their initiatives into their insurance coverage, “There is a great deal of confusion and anxiety for some at risk residents when it comes to their insurance coverage. Our goal is to have all insurance companies recognize our certificate so homeowners who take the initiative and perform effective mitigation that meets Colorado State Forest Service guidelines do not have to worry about the insurability of their home,” said Jim Webster.

 

The program has proven very popular with participants. In a recent survey, 91% of respondents said it very likely or likely that they would refer the Wildfire Partners program to a friend or neighbor. The 2014 program is currently full. Interested homeowners can sign up to be on the waiting list at www.WildfirePartners.org.

 

Wildfire Partners is funded by Boulder County and a $980,000 Wildfire Risk Reduction Grant from the Colorado Department of Natural Resources and includes more than 25 partner organizations. For more information, contact Jim Webster at 720-564-2600.

 

-www.WildfirePartners.org

 

About Allstate

The Allstate Corporation (NYSE: ALL) is the nation’s largest publicly held personal lines insurer, protecting approximately 16 million households from life’s uncertainties through its Allstate, Encompass, Esurance and Answer Financial brand names and Allstate Financial business segment. Allstate is widely known through the slogan “You’re In Good Hands With Allstate®.” The Allstate brand’s network of small businesses offers auto, home, life and retirement products and services to customers in the United States and Canada. In 2013, The Allstate Foundation, Allstate, its employees and agency owners gave $29 million to support local communities. Allstate employees and agency owners donated 200,000 hours of service across the country.

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4200Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Hessie Trailhead Shuttle concluded for seasonShuttle will now run 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekends and stop at the Nederland Park-n-ride
Boulder County’s free shuttle service to and from the Hessie Trailhead in the Indian Peaks Wilderness Area ended for the season Sunday, Oct. 5. 

The Hessie Trailhead shuttle program began in summer 2012 to address the issue of increased parking and traffic congestion on the way to the trailhead. The first two years of the program have been increasingly successful, providing over 5,000 rides in 2012 and over 7,000 rides in 2013. This year, the shuttle schedule was slightly revised and extended to include peak “leaf peeping” weekends in the falll.

If you would like more information, visit www.HessieTrailhead.com, or contact Andrew Barth at 303-441-1032.  

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4199Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Multicultural Awards Banquet marks 26 years of honoring community contributorsBoulder County, Colo. - The Boulder County Community Action Program (CAP) will celebrate the Twenty-Sixth Annual Multicultural Awards Banquet on Thursday, Oct. 2, at the Plaza Hotel in Longmont. Tickets are $65 per person and reservations must be made by Sept. 11.

The banquet recognizes people of different ethnic backgrounds who have made significant contributions to Boulder County in the areas of arts, business, community service, education, government, health, partners, science and youth. The theme for the banquet – Cross the Bridge and Join Together – is particularly appropriate in a ceremony that bridges cultural differences. CAP has been advocating for programs that meet the needs of low-income people since 1965, targeting youth, families and issues of inclusion.

Award recipients for 2014 are:
Tamil Maldonado - Art
Jose Beteta - Business
Jann Oldham – Community Service
Maria Ramirez - Education
Christina Pacheco - Government
Yanina Gomez - Health
Kirsten Wilson - Partners
Naat’a’anii Todea - Youth

Proceeds from the banquet provide scholarships for students with low income to attend college. Last year $9,000 was given in scholarship monies. Prior to CAP’s first Awards Banquet in 1989, local recognition did not exist for people of color who made a significant impact in Boulder County.

The Keynote Speak this year features, Dr. Reiland Rabaka, Award-Winning Poet, Spoken-Word Artist, and Musician. He has published ten books, including W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problems of the Twenty-First Century (2007); Du Bois’s Dialectics: Black Radical Politics and the Reconstruction of Critical Social Theory (2008); Africana Critical Theory (2009); Forms of Fanonism: Frantz Fanon’s Critical Theory and the Dialectics of Decolonization (2010); Against Epistemic Apartheid: W.E.B. Du Bois and the Disciplinary Decadence of Sociology (2010); Hip Hop’s Inheritance: From the Harlem Renaissance to the Hip Hop Feminist Movement (2011); Hip Hop’s Amnesia: From Blues and the Black Women’s Club Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Movement (2012); and The Hip Hop Movement: From R&B and the Civil Rights Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Generation (2013).

The Multicultural Awards Banquet has attracted support from the following prime sponsors: Amgen, Daily Camera, Boulder Community Health, Boulder Valley Credit Union, and Corden Pharma Colorado, Inc.

Reservations can be made by emailing sgoetz@bouldercounty.org or calling 303-441-3976.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4194Fri, 29 Aug 2014 10:00:00
BoCo Strong Flood Commemoration Event Scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 7Boulder County, Colo. – Residents are invited to the Flood Commemoration Event, hosted by BoCo Strong, a sub-committee of the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group (LTFRG), to learn about resiliency, share stories, provide support to one another and become stronger as a community.

When: Sunday, Sept. 7, 12-4:00 p.m.
Where: Gateway Park and Fun Center, 4800 28th Street, Boulder (map)
Details: There will be family activities and story sharing. Food trucks will be available. Playback Theatre West will perform at 2:30 p.m.

BoCo Strong, in partnership with Jamestown, Lyons, Longmont, Boulder and Boulder County will co-host a Flood Commemoration Week Kickoff event for residents of the county. The event will provide residents with an opportunity to mark the anniversary of the devastating flood and our resolve to come back stronger. There will be information booths about preparedness and resiliency, activities for families - including a theater group working with audience stories for their performance - arts and crafts, and story sharing. 
The event is an opportunity for residents countywide to come together and share stories of resilience and to learn from the experience of other communities. 

In addition to identifying and addressing individual unmet needs, the LTFRG has learned from other communities hard hit by disaster the importance of engaging all parts of the community about how to rebuild stronger and better. This rebuilding includes all-hazard mitigation, cultural landmarks, economic development, nonprofits, parks and other public infrastructure. BoCo Strong was formed as a subcommittee of the LTFRG to champion community engagement and build community resilience. 

BoCo Strong believes a critical piece of building resilience is convening conversations about strengths, areas to improve and opportunities for taking action. The goal is to help build connections among individuals, neighborhoods, communities and all sectors that will foster natural and opportunistic partnerships and strategies for resilience. 

For more information about the event, visit the BoCo Strong website www.BoCoStrong.org, call 303-441-1609, or email bocostrong@gmail.com.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4192Thu, 28 Aug 2014 10:00:00
County seeking mentors to help change the lives of juvenilesBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is looking for volunteers willing to dedicate their time on a weekly basis to help local teens achieve positive life changes. 

The Boulder County Community Services Mentor Program is seeking adults who can work well with teens (involved with county services) to be a positive role model and commit to mentoring weekly. Volunteer time essentially consists of activities enjoyed by participants, whether it is going to a ballgame, watching a movie or just grabbing a bite to eat.

The Mentor Program matches adults and juveniles one-on-one in order to provide youths with enduring links to positive supports in the community. Adult role models provide the teens with a unique support relationship that can promote the development of positive assets and reduce the likelihood of recidivism. Mentors also provide individual attention that separates teens from the potential influences of higher-risk peers. 

Volunteers are required to complete training and commit to mentor a teen for one year. Mentors will meet with their teens once per week for 2-3 hours according to a flexible schedule that meets their needs and the schedule of their mentees. Mentors can plan activities that meet their interests; current mentoring pairs have participated in activities such as pottery painting, horseback riding, dance classes and movies.

All prospective mentors must pass a criminal background check. The deadline for applications is Sept.16. For application information and additional details, contact the Justice System Volunteer Program at 303-441-4890 or abrubacher@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4189Tue, 26 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Community Meeting to Kick-Off Fourmile Creek Watershed Master Planning Sept. 3Boulder County, Colo. – The public is invited to learn more about and provide input on the Fourmile Creek watershed master planning and Fourmile Canyon permanent roadway planning. 
 
When: Wednesday, Sept. 3, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Where: Alfalfa’s Community Room, 1651 Broadway, Boulder
Details: A half-hour open house will follow the meeting. 

The purpose of the public meeting is to inform residents about the master plan and how individual properties fit into broader watershed planning; learn how roadway and watershed planning efforts are being integrated; provide input on focus areas for the watershed master plan; and get updates on roadway planning on Fourmile Canyon Drive – from Salina Junction to just north of Logan Mill Road, and from Poorman Road to one-mile north of Highway 119.

What is the Master Plan?
The Left Hand Creek Watershed Master Plan is being developed to help identify future long-term priority projects that will restore the creek corridor and reduce future flood risk to public and private infrastructure. This is an opportunity to study the post-flood conditions and recommend and prioritize long-term flood recovery, watershed restoration and future flood mitigation projects. The master plan will also focus on preserving, enhancing, or restoring the creek’s natural environment, and will identify priority projects that meet community needs to be implemented as funding becomes available. The plan will also increase competitiveness for federal and state funding.
 
Community involvement is critical to the success of the master plan and is essential to incorporate local needs of residents, property owners and the broader public into long-term planning for the Fourmile Creek watershed.

Project Team and Contact Information
For more information about the master plan, visit the project website at www.fourmilemasterplan.com. Contact the project team at 720-407-4789 or fourmilemasterplan@mediate.org.  

For more information about permanent roadway plans, contact Andrew Barth at abarth@bouldercounty.org or call 303-441-1032.

Left Hand Creek Watershed Master Plan Project Manager:
Kevin Doyle
Michael Baker International 
720-514-1102 or kdoyle@mbakerintl.com 
 
Fourmile Creek Watershed Master Plan Public Involvement:
Laura Sneeringer
CDR Associates 
720-407-4715 or lsneeringer@mediate.org 



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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4188Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:00:00
East County Line Road bridge reconstruction to start on FridayRoad will remain closed through October

Boulder County will begin work on Friday, Aug. 22 to replace the bridge on East County Line Road over St. Vrain Creek that was washed away during the 2013 flood event. The road will remain closed 24-hours a day to all users between Highway 119 and Quicksilver Road until the bridge is reopened at the end of October. 

The project will be completed by Lawrence Construction. Their winning bid came in just under $3.6 million, which was under the county’s engineering estimate ($5.4 million) by approximately $1.8 million. The county has also had to coordinate with the State of Colorado due to an existing eagle’s nest that is not far from the project site. Wildlife monitors will be on site during construction to ensure that their habit is not disturbed by the project. All work has been approved by the state and federal governments and is eligible for reimbursement.

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. 
For more information on the work, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4184Wed, 20 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Watershed Restoration Grants awarded to projects in Boulder CountyBoulder County, Colo. – The Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) has awarded $907,280 for 10 watershed restoration projects in Boulder County. The funds will be used to begin long-term creek recovery projects identified after the 2013 Flood. 

Pending receipt of matching funds, projects in Boulder County will include: 
  • James Creek- Stream restoration design and implementation on a 1.5 mile section of James Creek just below Jamestown, including integration with permanent road design. 
  • Fourmile Creek- Integration of the roadway reconstruction and bank stabilization on 900 foot stretch near Poorman Road. The project will include implementation of environmentally-aligned and sustainable restoration of adjacent reach of stream. 
  • Peschel Open Space- Restoration of St. Vrain Creek on City of Longmont and Boulder County owned Peschel Open Space. The objectives of the restoration include channel stabilization, riparian re-vegetation, aquatic and terrestrial habitat improvement, natural hazard reduction, flood mitigation, and low flow channel development. 
  • Hall Ranch- Design services for creek restoration on a 3.2-mile stretch of South St. Vrain Creek. The project would design for the protection of current infrastructure and private property while maintaining natural creek processes, improving habitat and protecting natural resources. The project could also include implementation of a stream restoration project upstream of the South Ledge Ditch.
  • McConnell Ponds- The project includes the restoration and mitigation of the McConnell Ponds area in Lyons.  The project proposes to improve river recreation and safety.
In addition to the projects listed above, five grants were awarded to other projects in Boulder County: two projects in the Boulder Creek watershed, two projects in the Left Hand Creek watershed, and one project in the St. Vrain watershed. 

“The watershed restoration grants will help us begin long-term creek restoration in a way that benefits the natural creek environment, while also protecting infrastructure,” said Sean Cronin, Executive Director of the St. Vrain and Left Hand Water Conservancy District. 

Post-flood master plans are being developed for many watersheds in Boulder County, including St. Vrain Creek, Left Hand Creek, and Boulder Creek. The master plans are being coordinated by coalitions of local, state, and federal organizations and agencies, and also include substantial public input. Many of the awarded projects were identified as part of the master planning process. The master plans will identify and prioritize additional restoration projects and will also identify potential funding sources.  

“There is a lot of work needed to restore the creeks and surrounding areas in our county. It will take multiple sources of funding to pay for the creek restoration work that is needed. The coalitions will continue to look for additional funding for these high priority projects,” said Ron Stewart, Director of the Boulder County Parks and Open Space department.

The grants were awarded through the Stream Restoration Grant Program established by Senate Bill 14-179. The CWCB will provide technical support for the projects. 

“We are excited to assist communities in their flood recovery efforts and we look forward to working with the awardees to design and implement these restoration projects,” said Chris Sturm, Stream Restoration Coordinator for the CWCB. 

For more information about the watershed restoration projects, contact Stacey Proctor at 303-441-1107 or sproctor@bouldercounty.org or visit www.BoulderCountyCreekPlan.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4178Fri, 15 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Temporary asphalt paving and safety measures installation to begin on Lefthand Canyon Drive Aug. 18 and on James Canyon Drive Aug. 25Expect travel delays; Cyclists asked to avoid the area during working hours due to safety concerns

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County will begin laying asphalt on portions of Lefthand Canyon Drive between US 36 and Hwy 72/Peak to Peak Byway that washed away during the September 2013 flood on Monday, Aug. 18. The same operation will begin on James Canyon Drive in James Canyon the following Monday, Aug. 25. Work in both canyons will take place from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. Work in James Canyon is expected to end in mid-October, while work in Lefthand Canyon is planned through the first week of November. 

Travel delays of up to 15-minutes can be expected during working hours and traffic control personnel will be used in sections to direct traffic through work zones. 

The work will consist of paving a 22-foot wide asphalt road on the gravel sections of the canyons. In addition, repairs will be made to roadway shoulders and slopes to improve their stability. Striping work will follow the paving operations. The damaged areas of canyon roads are receiving temporary asphalt patches at this time in order to ensure that the roads remain safe and passable for all users through next fall, winter and spring run-off while permanent roadway design plans are completed.

Because permanent reconstruction is not expected to start until the spring of 2015, the asphalt patching will be easier, and less costly to maintain throughout the winter and will improve safety by reducing the number of potholes, ruts and potential for washboarding. The paving project will also include shoulder stabilization work in order to strengthen the roadway in areas where the creek could erode the stream bank and cause structural problems for the road.

Cycling in Construction Zones
Cycling in James Canyon will remain restricted to everyone but permitted locals who commute primarily by bicycle, as it exists today. 

Boulder County project managers and engineers and emergency service providers will routinely evaluate cycling safety in Lefthand Canyon during the project and may close the road to recreational cyclists if conditions dictate. Cyclists can expect to see large volumes of heavy machinery and semi tractor-trailers navigating the length of canyon roadway throughout the construction period each work day. In many areas, the roadway shoulder has been washed away, leaving little room for passing cars and forcing cyclists into the main flow of traffic with motor vehicles. When large trucks hauling materials navigate the current state of canyon roads they are forced to cross the center-line in many areas in order to safely travel around some of the sharper corners. While the cab of the truck may now be in the outside lane, the trailer will still be on the insdie lane and can actually track onto the outer-half/shoulder and create a dangerous situation for cyclists and other roadway users. The graphic attached to this news release depicts this situation. 

Boulder County asks that all roadway users navigating these stretches of road be vigilant of their surroundings as travel conditions can change quickly. Cyclists are being asked to ride single-file at all times in Boulder County mountain canyons that are under construction. Motorists are asked to be patient when cyclists are forced off the shoulder and into the roadway, and to use caution when passing cyclists heading up and down the road. Visit the Safe Cycling on Boulder County Canyon Roads website to see current roadway conditions and learn how cyclists and motorist can travel together on county roads. 

After the road is repaved, new striping and signage will be applied, which should help alert roadway users to the changing conditions and widths of the road. A motorist-cyclist working group was convened by Boulder County in June of this year that met several times to discuss ways to make travel safer for both groups when using flood-damaged and temporarily repaired canyon and mountain roads. The striping and signage solutions were some of the ideas the group came up with to help everyone safely navigate area roads. 

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. If there are delays due to weather, Boulder County may allow the contractor to work on Saturdays in order to complete the project. 

For more information on the work, visit the project website or contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4177Thu, 14 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners Refer Two County Issues to November Ballot

Measures would help fund Flood Recovery and extend Human Services Safety Net

Boulder County, Colo. – The Board of County Commissioners has approved resolutions to place two countywide issues on the November ballot. One asks voters to approve a Flood Recovery Sales and Use Tax; the other seeks to extend an existing property (mill levy) tax that provides funding for Human Services Safety Net programs.

 

Flood Recovery Sales and Use Tax – County Issue 1A

Issue 1A provides for a 0.185% sales and use tax for a period of five years (for a total of $49.6 million) to fund flood recovery. The sales tax amount equates to a little under 2 cents on a $10 purchase, or 18.5 cents on a $100 purchase within Boulder County limits.

 

The funds would be used to pay for the costs associated with immediate flood response, repair of public infrastructure, including permanent repairs to roads and bridges, and restoration of waterways, and assistance to county residents impacted by the 2013 Flood. In addition, these funds would be used to ensure Boulder County's readiness to respond to future disasters and emergency situations.

 

“The rainy day funds that we had in reserve prior to the flood have been expended,” noted Commissioner Cindy Domenico at the public hearing. “Having the reserve in place helped us respond quickly and capably to the community’s needs, and made our residents more safe and secure following the flood, but those reserves have been spent and there are more expenses coming in every day. In order to accomplish the critical work that still needs to be done to our roads and other public resources, we need to ask the community’s help in raising money for these essential repairs.”

 

Flood Recovery Background

 

From September 2013 through July 2014 Boulder County has spent $40 million in flood response and recovery efforts. It is planned that over the next five years, approximately $217 million will be spent on recovery, with the vast majority being spent on major repairs to public infrastructure.

 

Much of the flood recovery work will be eligible for reimbursement by either federal or state partners, but not all of it. After accounting for all anticipated State and Federal reimbursement, the county has an approximately $56.1 million funding gap in flood recovery expenses. This proposed sales and use tax would cover most of that shortfall.

 

“The community’s response to the 2013 Flood has truly been impressive,” said Commissioner Elise Jones. “It’s never an easy thing to ask residents to increase their taxes, but in order to cover the necessary cost of rehabilitation, recovery and resiliency in our communities, Boulder County will need to rely on the public’s help to dig a little deeper for a short period of time so that we can put our county’s transportation and waterways network back in order, get our residents back on their feet, and leave our county ready to respond to the next disaster.”

 

“The flood was an unprecedented event in the county, and the spending by the county to recover from it is historic,” said Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle. “Emergency funds and reserves build up slowly over time, and we have spent our reserves in response to the 2013 Flood. Maintaining our ability to respond adequately and rapidly to the next wildfire, flood, or major event is an essential public service that we need to preserve.”

 

Human Services Safety Net Extension – County Issue 1B

The Board of Commissioners also approved a resolution to ask voters to extend a 0.9 mill ad valorem property tax for an additional term of 15 years to continue to fund crucial safety net services for Boulder County residents. The continued combination of increased need and decreased funding has made it challenging for Boulder County to meet the needs of its most vulnerable residents.

 

The existing mill levy equates to about $21 per year for a property valued at $300,000, and generates about $5 million each year to help provide for high quality services that promote family stability and ensure that people have access to the basic services that they need to get out of crisis and continue towards self-sufficiency.

 

In addressing the need for an extension of the Safety Net Mill Levy, Department of Housing and Human Services Director Frank Alexander said, “We’ve heard it loud and clear from our neighbors: people want community-based solutions that focus on prevention and support.” He added, “The future is increasingly unpredictable, and we need to continue to use successful approaches that anticipate and address crises before they worsen.”

 

Commissioner Deb Gardner noted the importance of investing in the community to help everyone’s future. “The need is still there because even though the Great Recession has ended, it has not been equally accessed by everyone. Many people have not been able to return to work or find work at a living wage, and there continues to be access issues around education, healthcare, and living wages,” said Gardner. “Extending the safety net which focuses on preventative measures to help keep families from falling into chronic crisis is an investment in our community, and one that helps reduce future expenditures and the need for more expensive interventions down the road.”

 

Commissioner Jones ended the hearing by stating that “both issues work to address the resiliency and long term strengths of our community,” adding that she and her fellow commissioners “wholeheartedly support” these investments in our community.

 

Next Steps

  

Members of the public are invited to present comments concerning the two ballot resolutions to the Board of Commissioners (email commissioners@bouldercounty.org) during the public comment period. The final deadline for certifying ballot titles to the County Clerk for inclusion on the ballot is Friday, September 5.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4176Tue, 12 Aug 2014 10:00:00
The Left Hand Outdoor Challenge Application Deadline Extended to September 30Boulder County, Colo. – The Left Hand Outdoor Challenge is now accepting applications for its third season.  The deadline for applications has been extended to Sept. 30. Active outdoor enthusiasts are also needed to serve as program leaders to help facilitate the programs.

The program is designed for Boulder County area teens ages 14-18 and seeks to teach them about various careers in natural resources as well as to develop new outdoor skills. Only a few spots left. 

The LHOC season spans September 2014 to May 2015 and consists of one two-hour Wednesday meeting and one six-hour Saturday challenge per month. Some of examples of this year’s challenges are rock climbing, search and rescue, and primitive skills.

The program has received awards from the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education for best new environmental program, the National  Association of Counties Achievement Award for Children and Youth and the Boulder County Pinnacle Award as Commissioners Choice.  

For more information go to www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org/challenge, contact Park Ranger Jason Vroman at 303-678-6350, or Park Ranger Sarah Holton at 720-261-2495, or email LHOC@bouldercounty.org.

To check out photos and challenges from last year, go to the Left Hand Outdoor Challenge Facebook Page, www.facebook.com/lefthandchallenge.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4175Wed, 03 Sep 2014 10:00:00
Plague Identified Near Cherryvale and South Boulder RoadsBoulder County, CO - Fleas collected in open space near the 7200 block of Terrace Place in Boulder, northeast of Cherryvale and South Boulder Roads, have tested positive for plague. This is the first time plague activity has been confirmed in Boulder County this season.

Flea samples were taken at that location after Boulder County Public Health was notified by a neighbor who noticed prairie dogs had died off on their property.

The neighborhood area has been posted with signs listing precautionary measures to avoid plague, and notices have been sent to local parks and open space partners, as well as animal control officers.

“Because plague is most commonly transmitted by fleas, taking steps to avoid flea exposures will help prevent the spread of the disease,” said Lane Drager, Boulder County Public Health Consumer Protection Program coordinator.

Public health officials recommend the following precautions to reduce the likelihood of exposure to plague:

  • AVOID FLEAS! Protect pets with flea powder, drops, or a new flea collar. Keep pets on a leash and out of wild rodent habitats.
  • STAY OUT of areas that wild rodents inhabit. If you enter areas with wild rodents, wear insect repellent and tuck pants cuffs into socks to prevent flea bites.
  • AVOID all contact with wild rodents, including squirrels; do not feed or handle them.
  • DO NOT TOUCH sick or dead animals.
  • PREVENT rodent infestations around your house. Clear plants and materials away from outside walls, reduce access to food items, and set rodent traps.
  • TREAT known rodent sites around your home with flea powder or a suitable insecticide.

Household pets, such as dogs and especially cats, can get plague themselves or carry infected fleas home to their owners. In rare instances, plague can be transmitted to people from cats sick with plague.

“Keeping cats indoors is the best way to protect them from getting plague,” said Drager. “Pet owners should also discuss with their veterinarians the best way to protect pets from fleas.”

Plague occurs naturally in Colorado and is an infectious disease spread by fleas to wild rodents and other small mammals, such as, squirrels, rats, prairie dogs, and rabbits. Bubonic plague is the most common form of plague and occurs after a bite from an infected flea. Plague can spread to humans when infected fleas from squirrels, prairie dogs, and other wild rodents bite a human.

Symptoms of plague include high fever, extreme fatigue, and painful swollen lymph nodes (called bubos). Anyone observing these symptoms in a person or pet should contact their health care provider or veterinarian immediately. Plague can be treated with antibiotics, but the treatment is most successful when the disease can be diagnosed quickly.

For more information about plague, visit www.BoulderCountyVector.org or call 303.441.1564.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4174Tue, 12 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Eight Boulder County Programs Receive Achievement AwardsBoulder County, Colo. – The Board of County Commissioners had the pleasure of honoring eight Boulder County programs and projects that have earned National Association of Counties (NACo) recognition, including one that earned the Best in Category designation at a ceremony Aug. 12.

One of the criteria for winning the NACo Achievement award is innovation, and Boulder County is proud that staff members continue to produce and implement innovative programs which consider the unique challenges of our community.

These awards speak volumes about our county’s creativity and imagination, but most importantly, these programs are honored because they have been effective. Innovation is good, but execution is critical.

The 2014 NACo Achievement Award winners include:

Affordable Care Act Implementation – Human Services  
Boulder County Department of Housing & Human Services (HHS) created a proactive, collaborative and data-driven approach to help uninsured residents obtain healthcare. HHS collaborated with community partners to send informational mailings, pre-populated applications, texts and emails to these targeted residents.As a result of combined efforts, over 15,000 Boulder County residents enrolled in expanded Medicaid and private health insurance.

Carve! Campion Cottonwood Art & Sapling Project – Arts & Historic Preservation 
Best in Category 
A fallen branch from a dying champion cottonwood tree measuring the same size as an average, fully-grown cottonwood tree was harvested and offered to woodworkers to create art pieces which were displayed as functional at the Longmont Museum in an exhibit titled “Carve! Selected Works from the Champion Cottonwood.” Also, Boulder County municipalities and school districts were offered a champion cottonwood sapling to plant in their communities.

Comprehensive Plan: Environmental Resources Element – Environmental Protection & Energy 
The updated ERE is the most comprehensive set of critical natural resources maps found in Boulder County. The maps make it easier to determine where appropriate development should go, where sensitive resources should be protected and where future open space should be pursued. The final maps are currently being used as Boulder County moves forward with recovery from the historic 2013 Flood. 

Disaster Food Assistance – Emergency Management & Response  
Boulder County collaborated with the State of Colorado to implement a seven-day emergency program called disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Emergency eligibility stations were constructed at two Disaster Assistance Centers, allowing application and issuance of food assistance benefits to take place alongside many other community resources. During the seven-day DSNAP program (Sept. 21-27), 324 applications were accepted and 268 applications were approved. The total amount of benefits issued was over $94,500.

Emergency Call Center – Emergency Management & Response  
Boulder County created a public Emergency Call Center to help relieve the 911 Communications Center of the thousands of requesting information during disasters. The Call Center has become an integral part of the Emergency Operations Center, with an official place at the table as a designated resource under Emergency Support Function 15/External Affairs. There are enough staff/volunteers to operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week as long as needed. During the Flood, 89 different staff/volunteers helped answer 8,248 phone calls over a-13 day activation. 

Latex Paint Recycling Program – Environmental Protection & Energy 
The Boulder County Hazardous Materials Management Program began recycling latex paint by contracting with a local recycling business. By recycling latex paint we divert a waste stream that would have otherwise been sent for solidification and landfill disposal. In 2013, nearly 23% (15,738 gallons) of the 68,868 gallons of latex paint we collected at the HMMF was recycled. Through its success, the program has encouraged the state legislature to consider and approve Product Stewardship legislation to fund paint recycling state-wide.

Left Hand Outdoor Challenge – Children & Youth
Left Hand Outdoor Challenge was developed as a way to mentor, engage and develop an outdoor leadership ethic in Boulder County teens. The program strives to mold the next generation of open space stewards through hands on skill building and career-based learning challenges in the outdoors. In the inaugural year, 28 teen participants and five program mentors provided 2,000 hours of volunteer service.

Responsible Payers Program – Human Services
The Responsible Payers Program (RPP) was established to identify and address barriers preventing non-custodial parents from making their regular court ordered child support payments. Prior to the development of the RPP, Boulder County was in-line with most other child support enforcement agencies nationwide that relied exclusively on punitive contempt of court actions to try to compel parents to pay their child support. At enrollment, 84% of participants were paying 0-24% of their monthly support amount. Upon exit, 58% of those same participants were paying 75% to 100% of their monthly amount.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4173Tue, 12 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Applications Available for Private Property Debris RemovalBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County recently received $1.9 million from the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) to create temporary jobs and assist with the flood recovery process. The Disaster National Emergency Grant (DNEG) program funds short-term labor positions for Boulder County residents to provide flood debris removal assistance to private property owners. A portion of the funding is designated to the removal of mud/sediment, vegetative and household debris deposited on private property by the 2013 Flood. 

All unincorporated Boulder County residential properties with remaining debris from the 2013 Flood are eligible to apply for the program. Commercial properties are also eligible, though residential properties will be given a higher prioritization in the selection process. Property owners who received direct financial assistance from FEMA for debris removal are not eligible for the DNEG program.

The DNEG workforce will arrive on-site with small hand tools, wheelbarrows, chain saws, and in some cases, mid-sized machinery including wheel loaders and backhoes. Applicants should provide detailed debris information in their application so that DNEG staff may come prepared with the appropriate tools and equipment. DNEG staff work between the hours of 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday-Friday. The program is anticipated to conclude in the fall of 2014.

Boulder County unincorporated property owners should complete the DNEG application at http://bit.ly/BoCoDNEG for their property to be considered for the DNEG program. Site selections will be made on a ‘first-come, first-served’ basis, and owner-occupied residential properties will be granted priority in the selection process. 

For more information, contact Kate Williams at 720-564-2237 or kwilliams@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4170Thu, 07 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Cyclist-Motorist Community Working Group provides recommendations to relieve tensions between the two groups Boulder County to implement several potential solutions

In an attempt to find solutions to make travel safer for both cyclists and motorists using flood damaged canyon and mountain roads, and because those roads are likely to see flood recovery construction activity for the foreseeable future, Boulder County convened a cyclist/motorist community working group in mid-June to share opinions and ideas. Over the last two months, local cyclists, area residents who drive and cycle, and law enforcement and emergency services personnel have discussed ways to improve safety on western Boulder County roads that are likely to be under repair for the next few years. 

Over the course of several meetings, the group discussed their diverse viewpoints and opinions, examined new communication tools and tactics to share information, and studied potential engineering solutions that might help everyone share the road while both temporary and permanent repairs are being made. Specific ideas and solutions that came out of the meetings include:

  • New signage that requests cyclists to ride single-file at all times on the narrow canyon roads.
  • Temporary striping solutions that let cyclists and motorist know when a shoulder is about to end, which will require shared use of the available lanes with vehicles for short distances. 
  • Engineering ideas to incorporate during the planning and design of the permanent canyon road repairs.
  • Creation of a new websites, including www.BoCoConeZones.com that lists all current construction activity around the county that impact both cars and bikes and has corresponding maps that are enabled for mobile devices. 
  • Creation of two new email listservs: one created for cyclists to receive biking-specific information; and, one created for motorists. The bike listserv can be found at www.BoulderCountyBike.com and motorists can register at www.BoCoConeZones.com
“The working group was a great opportunity for County transportation, motorists and cyclists to better understand each other’s thought processes when navigating area roads,” said Boulder County Transportation Director George Gerstle. “The two groups really came together and created some valuable dialogue and tangible solutions for making their travels safer and less nerve wracking. In the end, it’s all about safety, sharing the road, and patience and understanding. We’re going to be repairing roads for a while, and even when the flood recovery is complete, there will still be construction on county roads. It is my goal to make driving and cycling as safe as possible, and this group definitely helped with our efforts.”

For a complete list of working group participants and to see the presentations provided and read meeting notes, visit www.BoulderCountyBike.com and follow the “Cyclists/Motorist Working Group” link. There is also a newly created Safe Cycling on Boulder County Canyon Roads website with photos and graphics that depict just how dangerous the current roadway conditions can be for all users when heavy construction activity is taking place. The website offers tips to motorists and cyclists on how they can safely navigate western Boulder County roads. 

Boulder County asks for everyone’s patience and understanding while temporary and permanent repairs are made to county roads and trails. Please be aware of your surroundings and fellow travelers while moving through the area. 

For more information, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department Communications, at 303-441-1032.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4168Thu, 07 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Slope stabilization and other work to begin in Pine Brook Hills on MondayRoad closures and delays can be expected in the area

Boulder County and its contractors will begin repairing damages caused by the 2013 flood event in the Pine Brook Hills subdivision and surrounding areas on Monday, Aug. 11. Crews will be working from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., weekdays, through November to repair three locations where there were slope failures stemming from the flood event. 

In order to improve drainage conditions and repair the slopes at each location, crews will install retaining walls, bridge rails, and safety rails in each location in addition to repairing the roadway. 

Approximate location of the project sites in the area include:

Site 1 – 792 Pine Brook Road 
Site 2 – 650 Bow Mountain Road 
Site 3 – 1330 Timber Lane  

During construction, local access will be provided at all times for residents, delivery services, school buses, and emergency responders. Travel delays of up to 15-minutes may be necessary at times during the project. Detours will be established when and where necessary. 

A project information hotline – 720-452-6762 – and email - have been established for the duration of the work. Responses will be provided within 24-hours of receipt of any message. 

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4167Wed, 06 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners Announce Expected Gap in Flood Recovery FundingBoulder County, Colo. – As Boulder County has finalized identifying flood recovery projects with state and federal partners and the full costs of flood recovery have become clearer, the Board of County Commissioners has completed its total estimates of flood-related costs, reimbursements and projections. 

From September 2013 through July 2014 Boulder County has spent $40 million in flood response and recovery efforts. The county expects that by the end of 2014 the county will spend a total of nearly $80 million on flood-related projects. It is planned that over the next 5 years, approximately $217 million will be spent on recovery, with the vast majority being spent on major repairs to public infrastructure. 

A small sample of the projects that have been completed, are underway, or will begin in the near future include:
  • Immediate flood response including search and rescue of more than 800 people during  the flood event; 
  • Rental assistance and other immediate emergency assistance for residents whose homes were damaged or destroyed in the 2013 Flood;
  • Completion of temporary repairs to mountain roads, including James Canyon, Fourmile Canyon, Lefthand Canyon and Longmont Dam Road, in order to safely connect mountain residents to the rest of Boulder County; 
  • Permanent repair of the more than 150 miles of public roads damaged and destroyed in the flood, many of which are currently in design and slated for 2015 construction;
  • Repair or replacement of major bridges and culverts, including those on Flagstaff Road, 83rd Street over the Little Thompson, Valmont Road over South Boulder Creek, 61st/63rd Streets over St. Vrain Creek and on Wagon Wheel Gap;
  • Stream restoration work where riparian areas and wildlife habitat have been destroyed;
  • To prevent future flood damage to homes and property along the St. Vrain River, including in the City of Longmont, temporary repairs to breaches have been completed and plans for permanent repairs are being developed; and
  • Removal of more than 35,000 cubic yards of debris from the creeks in order to avoid major flooding during spring runoff and summer rains was completed in May.
Much of the flood recovery work will be eligible for reimbursement by either federal or state partners, but not all of it. Over the next five years, Boulder County expects a $56 million shortfall between the amount spent on flood recovery and the amount received in reimbursement. This shortfall will need to be paid for through county resources. A portion of this funding gap will be paid with money from the General Fund; however, there is not enough fund balance to cover the total shortfall. 
 
The county began 2014 with $60 million in its General Fund fund balance. Within that balance is approximately $30 million which cannot be spent in order to maintain compliance with nationally recognized standards established for annual fund balances. This year, the remaining fund balance will be spent primarily on flood recovery projects. It is important to note that flood recovery projects are paid in full by the county up front and reimbursed later, therefore the county must plan for $217 million in expenses over the next 5 years, not just the $56 million gap.  

In order to rebuild and help get our community get back on its feet, additional funds will be needed to complete essential flood recovery efforts and to retain the ability to respond to future disasters.

Sheriff Joe Pelle stated, “Our ability to manage a major event is dependent on using reserve funds.” The sheriff noted that quick, efficient response to fires, floods and other public safety issues generally requires immediate funding.

“In order to cover the necessary cost of rehabilitation, recovery and resiliency in our communities, Boulder County will need to rely on the public’s help,” said Commissioner Elise Jones. “County staff is currently exploring funding options as we navigate this post-disaster landscape. To secure a prosperous future for the county and assure the success and wellbeing of our residents, it is imperative that we move forward quickly with recovery and rebuilding efforts that will leave us an even stronger, more resilient community.” 

On Aug. 12, at 2 p.m., the Commissioners will be holding a public hearing to finalize ballot issues for the November 2014 election. At a business meeting Aug. 5, they directed staff to prepare a Ballot Title for a sales tax issue that will provide revenues to cover the majority of the $56 million shortfall over a timeframe consistent with the flood recovery work being undertaken by the county. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4166Tue, 05 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Parks and Open Space Niwot Trails Master Plan AmendmentBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Parks and Open Space is accepting public comment on the proposed amendment to the Niwot Trails Master Plan through September 13. 

Staff is seeking public input on issues and potential options before a draft plan is presented to the Parks and Open Space Advisory Committee and the Board of County Commissioners later this year.

For maps and descriptions of the changes, please visit www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org/niwot, call Brent Wheeler, Project Manager, 303-678-6184, or email bwheeler@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4165Fri, 22 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County moves ahead with dissolving Subdivision Paving Local Improvement DistrictLID property liens have been released and refunds are in process

 

Boulder County, Colo. – On Sunday, July 27, the Board of County Commissioners was apprised of the Boulder District Court's ruling in Case No. 13 CV 31685 (Wibby v. Board of County Commissioners) which ordered the county to dissolve the Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District (LID) and refund all paid assessments with interest. As a result, the county has moved forward this week with returning paid LID assessments to property owners and withdrawing the liens from all District properties.

 

Releasing the Liens

The court’s ruling invalidated the authorization and formation of the Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District and the November 2013 imposition of assessments on properties in the District. A Notice of Withdrawal and Release for all liens created under the LID was recorded with the Clerk & Recorder's office on July 31.

 

Refunds

Most refunds are straightforward. The vast majority of refunds (which will include an interest rate of 8% per annum from date of receipt of payment) are being returned directly back to the party that originally paid either the first year's annual assessment or the full 15-year payment by the end of August. In some cases, where property ownership transferred during the eight months under the LID, refunds will be made to title companies to distribute back to the transaction parties according to their real estate settlement documents.

 

Complete details about how refunds will be processed are available on the subdivision paving website

 

The county is requesting that property owners who have moved or whose mailing address has changed during the past eight months make sure to verify the address they have on record with the County Treasurer’s office as soon as possible. Anyone who meets these criteria should send their updated contact information to the subdivision paving email address or call the Treasurer's Office at (303) 441-3520 by Friday, August 8. Information should include the owner’s legal name (as it was recorded on the District property), the property address, a forwarding address, and a current phone number (so that we may contact the party for verification).

 

Property owners in the District who have questions or concerns about any unique circumstances in how their LID assessment was paid are encouraged to call the subdivision paving phone line at (303) 441-1612 or the Boulder County Treasurer’s office at (303) 441-3520 by Friday, August 8.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4158Fri, 01 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Temporary asphalt paving and safety measures installation to begin on Fourmile Canyon Drive next MondayExpect travel delays during work hours; Work in James and Lefthand canyons to start soon

Boulder County will begin laying asphalt on portions of Fourmile Canyon Drive between Boulder Canyon Drive and Salina Junction that washed away during the September 2013 flood on Monday, Aug. 4. Work in Fourmile Canyon will take place from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, and is expected to be complete by the end of August, weather permitting.

Travel delays of up to 15-minutes can be expected during working hours and traffic control personnel will be used in sections to direct traffic through work zones. 

The damaged areas of canyon roads are receiving temporary asphalt patches at this time in order to ensure that the roads remain safe and passable for all users through next fall, winter and spring run-off while permanent roadway design plans are completed.

Because permanent reconstruction is not expected to start until the spring of 2015, the asphalt patching will be easier, and less costly to maintain throughout the winter and will improve safety by reducing the number of potholes, ruts and potential for washboarding. The paving project will also include shoulder stabilization work in order to strengthen the roadway in areas where the creek could erode the stream bank and cause structural problems for the road.

Temporary asphalt patching in Lefthand and James canyons is tentatively scheduled to begin in August. Contractors have been selected and project schedules are being finalized. The exact start date and other project specifics will be posted on www.BoCoConeZones.com as soon as they are determined. Work in those canyons will also take place from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Work in Lefthand and James canyons is expected to end in mid- to late-October. 

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. 

For more information on the work, visit the project website or contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4152Tue, 29 Jul 2014 10:00:00
Statement from the Boulder County Clerk and RecorderOn Friday afternoon, the Attorney General’s office sent us an email requesting that we “closely review the order” issued earlier in the day by the Supreme Court, in which the Court ordered both Adams County and Denver to refrain from issuing same-sex marriage licenses.  According to the letter, we were to let the AG’s office know of our intentions by noon on Monday (today).  We responded with the attached letter advising the AG’s office that we do not believe the order applies to us and that we intend to keep issuing licenses. 
 
As part of the case made to the Colorado Supreme Court, the AG asked the court to enforce a stay on all clerks.  In addition, five county clerks filed briefs in the case asking for clarity as to whether they should or should not be issuing same-sex marriage licenses.  Despite having the clear opportunity to, the Court’s order did not address clerks in any other county, including Boulder County. 
 
Today, the AG’s office appealed to the Colorado Court of Appeals Judge Hartman’s July 10th decision denying their motion for a preliminary injunction.  In addition, shortly after noon, the AG’s office filed an additional motion with Boulder district court, a “Forthwith Motion for Stay Pending Appeal.”  The AG’s office argues in this motion that the Colorado Supreme Court’s order applies to all counties.  We disagree for the reasons set out in the attached letter.  By its own very clear terms, the Court’s order addressed only Adams County and Denver. 
 
“As I have stated before, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals stated that marriage is a fundamental right.  I think the least harmful and most sensible solution is to issue marriage licenses and avoid the potential of more civil rights violations while this plays out in court.  And that is what we intend to do,” stated Boulder County Clerk and Recorder, Hillary Hall.
 
Letter to the Office of the Attorney General
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4143Mon, 21 Jul 2014 10:00:00
Overnight work on Valmont Road will result in traffic delaysRoadway milling and patching between 61st and 75th streets 

Boulder County’s Transportation Maintenance Division will conduct nighttime asphalt milling and patching work on Valmont Road from Monday night, July 21 through early Friday morning, July 25. Work will take place between 7 p.m. and 5:30 a.m. and will result in traffic delays in both directions that could last up to 20-minutes. Please avoid the area by taking Jay Road or Arapahoe Road to access east and west Boulder County.  

While Boulder County Transportation Maintenance strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. Information on all current Boulder County Transportation Department projects can be found on the Closures & Construction website - www.BoCoConeZones.com. 

For more information on the work, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4140Thu, 17 Jul 2014 10:00:00
Work to continue on Wagonwheel Gap Road next weekRoad closed and detours established
The temporary culvert installation that started this week on Wagonwheel Gap Road will continue next week, Monday through Thursday, July 14 to 17. To accommodate the work, Wagonwheel Gap Road will be closed to all users from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, but detours will be established. 

Working hour detours are as follows:
  • Residents and visitors of 388 Wagonwheel Gap Road and higher seeking eastern access will be detoured from the area onto Bow Mountain Drive to Pine Brook Road to Linden Drive. 
  • Residents below 388 Wagonwheel Gap will be able to access Lee Hill Drive. 
After being heavily damaged during the September 2013 flood event, Boulder County’s Transportation Maintenance Division will continue installing temporary culverts on Wagonwheel Gap Road.

Crews may return again in July or August to complete the work. Additional roadway closure information, including dates, will be provided as they become known. 

Arrangements have been made with emergency service providers so they can respond to any situation that may occur on Wagonwheel Gap Road. The roadway will remain open to all users on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. 

For more information on the work, visit the project website or contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 

All current Boulder County Transportation roadway project information, including regular maintenance and flood-recovery activity, can be found at www.BoCoConeZones.com

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4129Fri, 11 Jul 2014 10:00:00
Wagonwheel Gap Road closed Tuesday through Thursday next weekTransportation Maintenance installing temporary culverts in the area

After being heavily damaged during the September 2013 flood event, Boulder County’s Transportation Maintenance Division will begin installing temporary culverts on Wagonwheel Gap Road at 8 a.m. next Tuesday, July 8. 

In order to accommodate the necessary work on the narrow road, Boulder County will need to close the roadway to pedestrians, cyclists and motor vehicles from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday, July 8 to July 10. Crews may be returning again in July to complete the work. Additional roadway closure information, including dates, will be provided as they become known.

Detours will be established and marked, and arrangements have been made with emergency service providers so they can respond to any situation that may occur on Wagonwheel Gap Road. The roadway will reopen to all users on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions.

For more information on the work, visit the project website or contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at abarth@bouldercounty.org or call 303-441-1032.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4120Thu, 03 Jul 2014 10:00:00
Ride Free! Longmont program starts July 1All local Longmont bus routes are free to ride all year

All RTD local bus routes in Longmont will be free for riders of all ages starting Tuesday, July 1.Hop on and off as many times as you want, all day long, through the end of 2014. 

No passes, cards or identification of any kind is needed to ride local buses that travel solely within Longmont. Regional routes (BOLT, L, and J) are not included, but riders that access regional routes via a local bus can request a transfer that is good for $2.25 off the regional fare. 

Local routes serving Longmont include:
  • 323: Skyline Crosstown
  • 324: Main Street
  • 326: Westside Crosstown
  • 327: Eastside Crosstown
More information including route maps and schedule information can be found at www.LongmontBus.com.  

Ride Free Longmont is made possible through a collaboration of the City of Longmont, Boulder County, and the State of Colorado. The six-month cost of the program is estimated at $108,000, which is the fare revenue RTD would have collected over this time from the four routes they provide. 

Boulder County obtained a State of Colorado grant that will cover 50 percent of the total cost of the program. The grant is aimed at providing transportation assistance to low-income families. The remaining half of the costs will be split between Boulder County and the city of Longmont. Boulder County’s funding source comes directly from the voter-approved Transit and Trails sales tax that is intended to increase transit ridership in Boulder County. 

“This is a great program for Longmont residents and visitors and an opportunity to increase ridership on Longmont buses,” said Boulder County Transportation Multi-Modal Division Manager Scott McCarey. “Transportation costs in low and moderate income families can rival the cost of housing, and RTD surveys show that 62 percent of passengers on the four local Longmont routes have total annual incomes of less than $25,000. A free bus ride each day can save a family a lot of money that can go to other necessities. We see this as a win-win-win program for Boulder County, Longmont, and RTD.” 

For more information on the program, visit the Ride Free! Longmont website, or contact Scott McCarey at 303-441-3900. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4114Thu, 26 Jun 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County 2014 Primary Unofficial Results AvailableBoulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division has finished tallying the majority of the ballots for the 2014 Primary Election. Unofficial election results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org. This will be the final number released until Monday, July 7. Election results will now undergo a preliminary audit process, Boulder County Canvass Board review, and final certification prior to the results becoming official. Final Primary Election results must be certified and submitted to the Secretary of State’s office by Monday, July 7.

As of approximately 3:30 a.m., the Elections Division finished tallying the preliminary results of 42,403 ballots. Eligible active voters affiliated with the American Constitution, Democratic and Republican parties participated in the Primary, as well as eligible active City of Longmont voters, in their Special Election. Out of the current 42,403 ballots casted, 4,134 are City of Longmont non-partisan ballots. In 2012, Boulder County saw 37,219 ballots cast in the Primary Election.

And while it is difficult to provide an exact comparison on voter turnout to previous primary elections because of changes in the law regarding active and inactive voters, it appears that voter participation in primary elections has risen.

“I am quite pleased with the turnout for the Primary Election this year,” stated Boulder County Clerk Hillary Hall. “We have seen a steady increase in participation since conducting our primary elections by mail. In 2006, our last polling place primary in a similar election year, we had half the number of ballots cast. Our new election model, where all voters are issued a mail ballot has worked great and increased participation, while leaving the decision of voting in person or by mail in the hands of the voter. I am excited to see how this fall’s General Election voter participation is under the new election model where all voters receive a mail ballot and can vote with greater flexibility and less stress.”  

The bulk of the outstanding ballots left to count are from military and overseas voters, provisional ballots, and any ballots where signature issues need to be cured. The Elections Division anticipates that the total amount of outstanding ballots to be less than 1100 ballots at this time.

Letters are being mailed to mail ballot voters who need to cure their signatures or provide a photocopy of their ID in order for their votes to be counted. Voters can check their information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify whether their signature or ID was accepted. The deadline for voters to provide their signature or photocopy of ID is 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 2.

In final reflection on this year’s Primary, Clerk Hall commented that, “everyone tends to focus on Election Day, but there is significant work that takes place year round in preparation for smooth elections. I’d like to commend the election staff and all the election temp workers who made this year’s election a success. While we are not done with our work, their outstanding commitment to a well-executed and transparent election process must be acknowledged.”

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4111Wed, 25 Jun 2014 10:00:00
Flagstaff Road reconstruction project - Daytime road closuresRoad closed to all traffic 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Contractors are rebuilding a portion of Flagstaff Road, which was heavily damaged during the September 2013 flood event. In order to complete the repairs, Boulder County Transportation will close the road in both directions to all users from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, until the project is complete at the end of November 2014.

Access to the top of Flagstaff Road will be available during weekday closures via Gross Dam Road which connects from Colorado State Highway 72/Coal Creek Canyon Drive. 

Several dates throughout the summer have been identified when no construction activities will take place so that the roadway can remain open to accommodate special events that were scheduled prior to the construction schedule being set. Those dates include:
  • Friday, July 4
  • Friday, July 11
  • Friday, Aug. 1
  • Friday, Aug. 29
  • Monday, Sept. 1
During the project, hiking trails on and around Flagstaff Mountain will remain open and accessible to hikers. No bikes are allowed on trails leading up and down Flagstaff Mountain. Gregory Canyon Road remains closed due to the damages sustained during the September 2013 flood event. Learn more about the hiking trails by visiting the City of Boulder's Open Space & Mountain Parks website

The Flagstaff Road project involves constructing a bridge that will span the damaged area and several additional feet of the road. The bridge is being installed to lessen the chance of a future major roadway failure resulting in additional repairs. The project will cost approximately $2.2 million.  

Arrangements have been made with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, Rocky Mountain Fire District, and the City of Boulder Police Department to ensure that emergency service providers can respond to any situation that may occur above the closure area. 

While Boulder County Transportation strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. 

For more information on the work, visit the project website, email Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, or call 303-441-1032. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4100Wed, 18 Jun 2014 10:00:00
Voter Service and Polling Centers open MondayLast day to register to vote online and still have a mail ballot sent to you
 
Boulder County – Elections in Colorado are conducted by mail ballot with select Voter Service and Polling Center locations available for those who require additional assistance or prefer to vote in person.
 
Beginning Monday, June 16, four Voter Service and Polling Centers will be available to service Boulder County voter needs between 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. (every day except Sunday, June 22) at the following locations:
 
All open locations as of June 16:
• Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street, Boulder
• Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 529 Coffman St., Longmont
• Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1376 Miners Drive, Lafayette
• Fire Station #5, 617 Barberry Drive, Longmont
 
Boulder County voters can visit a Voter Service and Polling Center to:
• Drop off a ballot
• Cast a ballot in person
• Request a replacement ballot
• Register to vote or update voter registration information
• Vote using equipment and facilities for persons with disabilities
 
In addition to the above locations, two more Voter Service and Polling Center locations will be available on Monday, June 23 and Tuesday, June 24 (Primary Election Day). Mail ballot packets included detailed information on all Voter Service and Polling Center locations as well as information on additional ballot drop-off locations. The information can also be found at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
Monday, June 16 is also the final day register to vote in the Primary and still have a mail ballot sent to you. After June 16, a person can register and vote in the upcoming election, but they will need to visit a Voter Service and Polling Center in order to request a ballot.
 
Voters who have not received a ballot or who have questions about their ballot can email the Clerk and Recorder’s office at vote@bouldercountyvotes.org, call 303-413-7740 or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center for more information.
 
Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4085Fri, 13 Jun 2014 10:00:00
Annual chip sealing of county roads starts MondayAvoid contruction areas on work days, if possible 
Boulder County’s Transportation Maintenance Division will begin annual chip seal work on 18-miles of county roadways on Monday, June 16. The work is expected to last two weeks. 

Chip sealing work consists of applying asphalt to a road surface followed by a layer of one-quarter inch chips that essentially create a new layer on top of the road. A week after the chips are applied, crews return to the area to apply a sealant designed to help the chips adhere to the road. This work is followed by roadway striping operations.

Boulder County Transportation encourages motorists and cyclists to avoid unnecessary travel on the following roads on days that the chip sealing operations are taking place as there may be travel delays:
  • North 79th Street from Niwot Road to SH 52 – Monday, June 16 chip application & Tuesday, June 24 sealant
  • Niwot Road from SH 119 to North 95th Street – Monday, June 16 chip application & Tuesday, June 24 sealant
  • North 75th Street from SH 66 to Woodland Road – Tuesday, June 17 chip application & Tuesday, June 24 sealant
  • North 83rd Street from Woodland Road to North County Line Road – Tuesday, June 17 chip application & Wednesday, June 25 sealant
  • North 87th Street from SH 66 to Woodland Road – Wednesday, June 18 chip application & Wednesday, June 25 sealant
  • North 95th Street from SH 66 to Yellowstone Road – Wednesday, June 18 chip application & Wednesday, June 25 sealant
  • Woodland Road from north 75th Street to north 95th Street – Thursday, June 19 chip application & Thursday, June 26 sealant
  • North 115th Street from SH 66 to Yellowstone Road – Thursday, June 19 chip application & Thursday, June 26 sealant
  • Vermillion Road from SH 287 to end of pavement – Thursday, June 19 chip application & Thursday, June 26 sealant
Chip sealing operations are part of the county’s primary network roadway rehabilitation plan. The process is intended to extend the lifespan of the roadway and postpone larger reconstruction efforts that would require more expensive work and longer travel restrictions. Primary network county roads are typically chip sealed every six to eight years. 

While Boulder County Transportation Maintenance strives to complete all projects on-time, work is weather dependent and there may be delays due to rain or other unfavorable working conditions. 

For more information on the work, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4082Wed, 11 Jun 2014 10:00:00
2014 Hessie Trailhead Shuttle Runs Through October 6Shuttles start running from Nederland Middle/Senior High School at 8 a.m. 

From September 6 through the last day on October 5, the pick-up location for the Hessie Shuttle will be moved to the RTD Park-n-Ride lot in Nederland.

Boulder County is providing a free shuttle service again on weekends and holidays this summer to carry passengers from Nederland Middle/Senior High School, 597 County Road 130, to the Hessie Trailhead, a popular entry point for accessing the Indian Peaks Wilderness Area. 

The Hessie Trailhead shuttle program began in summer 2012 to address the issue of increased parking and traffic congestion on the way to the trailhead. The first two years of the program have been increasingly successful, providing over 5,000 rides in 2012 and over 7,000 rides in 2013. This year, the shuttle schedule has been slightly revised and extended to include peak “leaf peeping” weekends in the fall. The shuttle schedule is included below. 

Rather than driving directly to the trailhead, visitors are encouraged to take the RTD ‘N’ bus to Nederland from Boulder or park at Nederland Middle/Senior High School and take the free shuttle instead. 

“We are excited to continue this popular summer program and for the first time to extend the service into October for leaf viewing,” said Boulder County Multimodal Division Manager Scott McCarey. “The shuttle operator, Via, has been a terrific partner offering exceptional service.” 

Parking near the trailhead and on nearby roads such as 4th of July Road is extremely limited, and Boulder County Parks & Open Space rangers are responsible for enforcing strict parking regulations in the area.

Shuttle Service:

The shuttle service began Saturday, June 7 and will run from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturdays and from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sundays throughout the summer. The shuttle will also run on holidays over the summer including Independence Day (July 4) and Labor Day (Sept. 1). This year, the shuttle operation schedule has been extended until Sunday, Oct. 5 to accommodate the peak autumn leaf season.

Details:
  • Park and catch the free shuttle at Nederland Middle/Senior High School. NOTE: From September 6 through the last day on October 5, the pick-up location for the Hessie Shuttle will be moved to the RTD Park-n-Ride lot in Nederland.
  • Take RTD’s ‘N’ route from Boulder and transfer to the shuttle at Nederland Middle/Senior High School
  • Shuttle arrives every 15 minutes 
  • Leashed dogs are welcome on the shuttle
  • Parking is for day use only; overnight users should make other arrangements

If you would like more information, visit www.HessieTrailhead.com, or contact Andrew Barth at or 303-441-1032.  

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4071Mon, 25 Aug 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County equipment testing completed for June 24 Primary ElectionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in the county’s upcoming Primary Election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test (LAT) held Tuesday.

Representatives from the local Democratic and Republican parties took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office and confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes.

The LAT also confirmed ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles were tested. In all, 1,729 ballots were tested, including 1,652 paper ballots and 77 electronic ballots on voting machines.

Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the Primary Election.

Results and test records are available for review at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

 

Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:

  • Week of June 2: Ballots mailed out this week. Select Ballot Drop-off locations open. All voter services available at Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office in Boulder.               
  • Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you; voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day. Voter Service and Polling Centers open – see website for location and details.
  • Friday, June 20: All Ballot Drop-off locations open.
  • Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

BoulderCountyVotes.org –

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk - 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4069Fri, 30 May 2014 10:00:00
Lee Hill Drive reduced to one lane of alternating traffic through JulyExpect delays when traveling through the area

Boulder County contractors have begun installing retaining walls on Lee Hill Drive just west of the Boulder city limits. In order to accommodate the work, Lee Hill Drive will be reduced to one lane of alternating traffic, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, through July.  

The work is part of recovery efforts stemming from the 2013 flood event. The project’s goal is to construct a large retaining wall along the portion of the road that runs next to Fourmile Canyon Creek. This work will prevent the roadway from being destroyed should it collapse into the creek, which would result in large recovery effort and a much longer construction timeframe.

During weekday construction hours, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., traffic will be flagged through the construction zone. During off-work hours, traffic will be controlled by an electronic stop light. Should the stop light fail, please call 303-819-4437 and Boulder County Transportation staff will work to repair the issue immediately. 

Boulder County is making every effort to complete the project on-time, but all work is weather dependent. 

For more information on the project, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at abarth@bouldercounty.org or call 303-441-1032. 
 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4067Fri, 30 May 2014 10:00:00
Primary Election less than a month awayBallots to arrive in homes week of June 2
 
Boulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division wants to remind voters that the Primary Election is less than a month away. Ballots to eligible Primary voters will be mailed starting June 2.
 
As with all elections now in Colorado, this election will be conducted entirely by mail ballot. The Boulder County Primary has been conducted by mail since 2010. New for this year’s Primary is that voters who prefer to vote in person may do so at any Voter Service and Polling Center instead of voting their mail ballot. Boulder County will have 6 Voter Service and Polling Centers open this Primary to service residents. Additionally, eligible residents can register up to and including Election Day and still vote in the current election.
 
The Elections Division will send ballots next week to eligible voters who are members of the Republican, Democratic and American Constitution parties. Additionally, the City of Longmont is conducting a Special Election. All City of Longmont voters will be receiving a ballot with the Longmont question regardless of party affiliation. In Boulder County, the total number of ballot recipients is 133,496 as of today and is expected to grow.
 
The mailed ballot packets include a detailed list of ballot drop-off points and service centers that will be open to the public prior to the Primary Election Day on Tuesday, June 24.
 
Unaffiliated voters may affiliate with a major party and vote in a primary up to and including Election Day. However, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office encourages voters to affiliate sooner, in order to ensure that you will receive your mail ballot in a timely fashion. Unaffiliated voters who change their registration after June 16 must request a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center (see BoulderCountyVotes.org for locations). Registration can be updated online at GoVoteColorado.com.
 
Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.
 
Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:
• Week of June 2: Ballots mailed
• Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you; voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day
• Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4061Wed, 28 May 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming electionBoulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming election
Logic and Accuracy Test to take place beginning May 27
 
Boulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division will conduct a logic and accuracy test beginning on Tuesday, May 27 on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2014 Primary Election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public.

What:     Logic and Accuracy Testing – Testing of ballots and equipment for upcoming election
When:    Begins 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 27; Testing typically takes a minimum of 1 work day.
               After the first day,  testing runs from 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. each day until complete.
Where:   Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street in Boulder
               Visitors will need to check in at the front desk of the Elections Office, Suite 200, to be escorted to the test area.
 
After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at www.BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
Boulder County voters can also visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
 
Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:
• Friday, May 23:  Deadline to change party affiliation from one party to another in order to participate in the Primary Election
• Week of June 2: Ballots mailed
• Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you; voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day
• Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4054Tue, 20 May 2014 10:00:00
Free Lyons-Boulder summer weekend shuttle returns for 2014Starting this Friday, May 23, the Lyons to Boulder free weekend shuttle will be back for the summer of 2014! After a successful run last summer that saw over 2,000 rides, the shuttle schedule has been revised and expanded.

From this Friday through Aug. 31, the free shuttle will run on Friday evenings and will provide up to 12 hours of service on Saturdays and Sundays. Check out the route map and schedule.

The Lyons-to-Boulder Shuttle runs between the Boulder Transit Center at 14th Street and Canyon Boulevard and the Lyons Park-n-Ride at Fourth Avenue and Broadway, with multiple stops along Broadway in Boulder and on U.S. 36 between Boulder and Lyons. 

The route will be operated by Via Mobility Services and will supplement the Regional Transportation District’s (RTD) Y route, which operates between Boulder and Lyons on weekdays. 

“We’re very excited about being able to provide a weekend link between Boulder and Lyons for the third consecutive year,” said Boulder County Transit Planner Jared Hall. “The route offers a great solution for people looking to attend summer festivals in Lyons and Boulder summer festivals or for a quick trip for lunch or dinner or to see friends.”


The Lyons-Boulder shuttle is funded by a combination of grants from the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE) and the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG). No bus fare or pass is required and the shuttle is open to riders of all ages.

All Lyons residents are eligible to receive a free RTD EcoPass, which provides access to the entire RTD transit system at no cost. Lyons residents interested in learning more about the free EcoPass can contact the Town of Lyons at 303-823-6622.

For more information on the free weekend shuttle, contact Jared Hall at 303-441-4958.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4053Tue, 20 May 2014 10:00:00
Approaching Deadline, Notice to Longmont VotersDeadline Approaching to Switch Parties and Participate in Primary Election; Special Notice to Longmont Unaffiliated Voters
 
Boulder County, Colo. – This year, the American Constitution Party, Democratic Party, and Republican Party will have Primary Elections on Tuesday, June 24. In order to participate in a party primary election, a voter must be registered with that party. Friday, May 23 is the deadline for those voters who are currently registered with a political party to switch to another political party and still participate in this year’s Primary. Unaffiliated voters may affiliate up to and including Election Day; however, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office encourages affiliation sooner, in order to receive your mail ballot in a timely fashion. Unaffiliated voters who change their registration after June 16, must request a ballot in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center (see www.BoulderCountyVotes.org for locations).
 
Additionally, Primary Election ballots are typically only mailed to voters who are affiliated with a participating political party. However, the City of Longmont is conducting a Special Election in conjunction with the 2014 Primary Election. All City of Longmont voters will be receiving a ballot with the Longmont question regardless of party affiliation.

If you are a City of Longmont resident who is interested in participating in a party primary, and you are either an Unaffiliated Voter or are unaware of your party registration, the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office strongly encourages you to check your voter registration. This way, you can affiliate with the party of your choice or update your voter registration prior to ballots getting mailed. Ballots will be mailed on June 2.

Boulder County voters can visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk and Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 1376 Miners Drive in Lafayette. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2014 Primary Election:
  • Friday, May 23:  Deadline to change party affiliation from one party to another in order to participate in the Primary Election
  • Week of June 2: Ballots mailed
  • Monday, June 16: Last day to register to vote online for the Primary Election and still have a mail ballot sent to you. Voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day
  • Tuesday, June 24: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4047Fri, 16 May 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners to hear updates on private access creek crossings, floodplain development permitting, and road construction plansThe Boulder County Commissioners will hear updates on transportation-related flood recovery efforts at a public study session starting at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, May 20. The public is invited to attend, but no public testimony will be heard at this time. The Commissioners will be provided updates on work in the canyons/mountains surrounding:

The comprehensive creek planning/mapping initiative;
Floodplain/way analysis;
Private access recovery (bridges and culverts) and permitting; and,
Permanent roadway designs and construction timeline.

The study session’s purpose is to inform the commissioners and the public about current and future plans and details of the meeting’s focus areas, and to answer the commissioners’ questions and obtain their feedback. The meeting will be streamed live and will be available online after the meeting has ended.  

After the study session, public meetings will be scheduled with residents in order to provide more detailed, area-specific information to mountain residents affected by the flood and to obtain input on each of focus areas. 

For more information on the study session or its focus areas, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at abarth@bouldercounty.org or call 303-441-1032. 
 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4046Fri, 16 May 2014 10:00:00
REMINDER: Roadside debris removal program ends May 21Residents asked to place debris on the side of the road and contact county for pick-up

Boulder County, Colo. – Unincorporated Boulder County residents in select hard hit areas (highlighted in yellow on the debris removal map) should place debris on the side of the road for pickup no later than Wednesday, May 21 to ensure that they won’t be responsible for disposal logistics and costs. Residents outside of the areas listed are responsible for their own debris disposal.

After moving debris to the roadside, residents must report pile locations to the county for pick-up by completing one of these actions:

• Fill out an online Debris Reporting Form;
• Send an email to debrisresponseteam@bouldercounty.org; or,
• Call 720-564-2222.

After contacting the county, a contractor will schedule trips to pick-up locations for debris removal. Failure to place debris on the side of the road and contacting Boulder County for pickup could result in residents having to pay for the removal of the debris themselves.

Please visit www.BoulderCountyFlood.org for a list of debris collection guidelines and rules. People are asked to take hazardous materials to the Hazardous Materials Management Facility at 1901 63rd St in Boulder.

For more information on the debris removal program, call 720-564-2222 or email debrisresponseteam@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4045Thu, 15 May 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Seeking Donors for Kids’ Summer Camp EnrollmentCounty hopes to enroll over 200 children and teens

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is seeking donors to help over 200 children and teens in the child welfare system spend time at summer camp this year. With camp registrations taking place now, donors are needed immediately.

“Every year, children and teens in Boulder County who could benefit from a summer camp experience aren’t able to go,” said Deborah Ramirez, Volunteer Coordinator for the Boulder County Department of Housing and Human Services (BCDHHS). “Many of these kids are in challenging situations and really need a boost from positive activities and quality time with their peers.”

BCDHHS’ Family and Children Services Division has overseen the Summer Camp Fund since it was created in 1994. It’s one of several such funds that work together to help give kids the camp experience. Over the past three summers alone, 128 kids have attended camps across Colorado because of the Summer Camp Fund alone, which covers up to $250 in tuition for child welfare-involved young people whose families or caregivers can’t afford these costs.

“My grandson is a great kid who has suffered too much in his life, and I’m just trying to give him every opportunity so he knows we are here for him,” said “Mary”, a kinship provider caring for her grandson. She recently applied for assistance through the Summer Camp Fund. “I know he would have a great time hiking, mountain biking, and kayaking, but the things I think he’ll benefit from most are the confidence boost, the opportunity to work as part of a team, and learning about how his choices affect others. I want him to listen to his heart and have pride in himself and his choices.”

Many children in the child welfare system are being raised by grandparents and other relatives with limited income, or are living in foster care. Others have disabilities and special needs. Summer camp helps expose these youngsters to positive new activities, keeps them engaged in existing interests, and gives siblings living in separate placements quality time together. Research (including Turner et al., 2007) suggests that such positive activities help young people develop healthy relationships with other youth and adults and help build stronger family connections. These activities also promote a well-rounded confidence that can help kids make better choices for themselves as they grow older.

“The summer camp experience is something every young person should have,” says Deborah Ramirez. “We’re hopeful more of our neighbors will step forward to help make that possible for more of Boulder County’s kids.” 

Those interested in donating to the Summer Camp Fund are encouraged to contact Deborah Ramirez at 303-441-1430 or dramirez@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4038Fri, 09 May 2014 10:00:00
Residents Invited to the 2014 Caregiving Symposium May 22Boulder County, Colo. – The 9th annual Caregiving Symposium, sponsored by Boulder County Area Agency on Aging (a division of Community Services), will be May 22 in Longmont. 

This educational event for family caregivers of older adults—or for anyone interested in caregiving issues—features a large resource fair of local service providers, informative handouts, lunch and 12 workshops on caregiving topics such as dementia care, caregiver self-care, legal issues, talking about end-of-life wishes, coordinating in-home providers, Latino caregiving, fall prevention and more. Caregivers are welcome to come for the full day or for only part of the event.

What: Caregiving Symposium
When: Thursday, May 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Where: Plaza Convention Center, 1850 Industrial Circle, Longmont
Cost: General admission is free

Register at www.caregivingsymposium2014.eventbrite.com, by calling 303-441-1685, or at the door. Pre-registration is encouraged.

On-site elder care is available by reservation at 303-441-1543. More information, including the complete agenda, is posted on the event webpage.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4035Thu, 08 May 2014 10:00:00
Traveling/Cycling Restrictions Established in James CanyonMayor Schoedinger asks for patience and cooperation to assist with recovery
 
Boulder County, Colo. – Due to continued recovery and repair operations associated with the September 2013 flood event, Boulder County is re-establishing restrictions on non-local traffic, including bicycles, in James Canyon from the junction with Left Hand Canyon, through Jamestown, to the junction with State Highway 72 (Peak to Peak). The restrictions will go into effect immediately. Lefthand Canyon will remain open to all roadway users.

While the county’s high-hazard area remediation work has moved out of the area and into Fourmile Mile Canyon, private recovery efforts remain extensive. There continues to be a high-volume of large trucks and heavy machinery moving in and around Jamestown, which is creating a hazardous environment for motorists and cyclists alike.

“Thanks to warmer weather, a lot of work has been completed in James Canyon and in Jamestown,” said Jamestown Mayor Tara Schoedinger. “Unfortunately, this work is really just the beginning of our community’s recovery and rebuilding efforts. The people who live here have seen a tremendous amount of support come in from all over the county, state and country, and we’ve all been amazed and are extremely grateful for the help. What we need now is to let residents and the people who have come to help rebuild have the room they need to do their job as quickly and safely as possible. With your help and patience, Jamestown will come back stronger than ever and once again be the beautiful mountain town that we all love to live in and visit.”

After the flood event, many sections of Lefthand Canyon and James Canyon Drive were completely destroyed and Boulder County worked quickly to replace the previous asphalt roadway by installing temporary dirt “winter roads.” In areas where “winter roads” were created, the unpaved roadway narrows significantly and safe, uphill shoulders for cyclists are no longer available. This forces cyclists into the main flow of traffic for extended lengths, creating hazardous riding and driving conditions for travelers in both directions.

County Transportation Director George Gerstle asks for everyone’s patience and understanding by avoiding travel in James Canyon, as well in the Fourmile Canyon and the Raymond/Riverside area unless you are a resident or have business in the area. “If you don’t live in these areas and aren’t helping rebuild these hard-hit communities, you’re probably obstructing recovery operations. We want to remind folks who want to travel the mountain canyons that Lefthand and Sunshine canyons are better options and are open all the way to the Peak to Peak Highway. These canyons are also are narrow and have been reconstructed out of dirt in many areas, so we are asking everyone to be patient and drive slowly, and remember we’re working to make the roads more safe for everyone.”

As was available before to area residents who routinely commute by bicycle, the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is offering special permits that will allow those people to continue cycling. Please call 303-441-3650 to obtain a permit. Failure to comply with the cycling restriction may result in a court summons.

For more information, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at abarth@bouldercounty.org or call 303-441-1032.
 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4033Thu, 08 May 2014 10:00:00
Community representative needed for Child Protection Recruitment Team Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is seeking a community representative to serve on the Child Protection Review Team to help protect Boulder County’s children. 

The Child Protection Review Team is a group of professional and community representatives who reviews child protection cases. The community representative will help review diagnostic, prognostic and treatment services available to the child and family. The Team also serves in an advisory capacity to the Boulder County Department of Housing and Human Services.

Applicants should be able to objectively and confidentially review cases. Have the ability to process emotionally charged information and be able to follow confidentiality protocol. For this vacant seat, preference will be given to applicants who are parents, stepparents, grandparents, foster parents, etc.

The Community Representative will need to be able to meet for up to two hours per week during a one year commitment. 
Meeting times:
  • Longmont: Tuesdays, 12:30-2:30 p.m., Longmont DHHS office
  • Boulder: Wednesdays, 12-2 p.m., Boulder DHHS office
The application deadline is May 14.

Those interested should contact Diane Ludwig at 303-441-4994 or dludwig@bouldercounty.org for more information and for an application.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4030Mon, 05 May 2014 10:00:00
Officials to Break Ground on New County Coroner FacilityBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Commissioners and Coroner Emma Hall will join staff to break ground on the new County Coroner Facility. The groundbreaking will herald the start of infrastructure site work for a new 9,275 square-foot Coroner’s facility. 

What: Groundbreaking Ceremony
When: Wednesday, May 7, 1 p.m.
Where: Sheriff’s Headquarters, 5600 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder
 
“Boulder County is long overdue for a modern day coroner facility. This groundbreaking ceremony will be the celebration of a huge step forward in public service for the coroner’s office. We are looking forward to enhancing our current services by having a facility with a welcoming atmosphere for grieving families, and we will finally be able to offer a convenient location with parking and easy building access,” said Boulder County Coroner Emma Hall. “The new facility will also increase the efficiency of the Coroner’s Office by combining all of our operations at one location, feature state of the art design and incorporate several advances in forensic technology.”  
 
The new facility is budgeted to cost $3.2 million. The building will include new offices and an autopsy facility for the coroner.
 
For more information about the Coroner’s facility contact Lori Dickes at 303-441-1518 or ldickes@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4029Mon, 05 May 2014 10:00:00
St. Vrain Creek restoration master planning process beginsBoulder County, Colo. – As part of long-term flood recovery, Boulder County has hired consultant Michael Baker Jr., Inc. to complete a master plan for the St. Vrain Creek watershed, which includes South St. Vrain Creek, North St. Vrain Creek, and the main stem of St. Vrain Creek to the confluence with Boulder Creek.

The master plan will be used to guide the county, municipalities, and individual landowners in identification and prioritization of stream rehabilitation and restoration projects.  The goal of the master planning effort and subsequent project implementation is increased resiliency in communities, economies, and river systems. 

“Using an open and collaborative process among public agencies, property owners, ditch companies, stakeholders, and the public, the St. Vrain master plan will help facilitate the transition to the next phase of creek recovery,” said Dave Jula, St. Vrain Creek Watershed Master Plan Project Manager, for Michael Baker Jr., Inc.

The master planning effort is funded by a grant from the Colorado Water Conservation Board, Boulder County, and other local agencies. The project will begin immediately with public meetings, field assessments, and data analysis. The final master plan is expected to be completed by early fall.

The consultant was selected through a competitive process by the St. Vrain Creek Coalition. The St. Vrain Creek Coalition consists of representatives from Boulder County, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Town of Lyons, City of Longmont, St. Vrain and Left Hand Water Conservancy District, USDA Forest Service, Arapaho Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado Department of Transportation, and the Colorado Water Conservation Board. 

“After thorough review of the bids we received, the St. Vrain Creek Coalition selected Michael Baker Jr., Inc. for the project because of their strong technical expertise and their commitment to citizen participation in the process,” said Julie McKay, St. Vrain Creek Coalition lead for Boulder County. 

Please refer to www.BoulderCountyCreekPlan.org for the schedule of public meetings, which will be announced in May.  

Similar master planning efforts are underway for many other watersheds in Boulder County, including Left Hand Creek, Little Thompson River, and Fourmile Creek. For more information on any of the master plans, please contact Stacey Proctor, Communications Specialist at 303-441-1107 or sproctor@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4026Thu, 01 May 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Begins Flood Recovery Collaborative Quilt ProjectLocal and national quilters asked to submit original squares to project

Boulder County, Colo. – In order to commemorate the upcoming one year anniversary of the devastating 2013 Flood, a collaborative quilt project will serve as a long-lasting memorial to Boulder County residents’ resiliency. The quilt will follow the theme “Boulder County: Strong and Beautiful.”

Quilters of all types from around the county, the state and the nation are invited to take this opportunity to work together to design a memorable Flood Recovery Quilt. A finished quilt, comprised of 30 blocks, will be hung in the Boulder County Courthouse on Pearl Street, and the remaining submitted blocks will be turned into items for flood survivors (including throw blankets, pillows, wall hangings, etc.). A committee of Boulder County leadership and local quilters will determine which submissions will be included in the Courthouse quilt based on both design and craftsmanship.

The completed quilt will be dedicated and hung during the week of September 8 to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the 2013 Flood. Items for flood survivors will be completed thereafter and donated as they are complete, with a final completion date of December 31. 

Quilt Block Guidelines
  • Quilt blocks should be a finished 12.5” x 12.5” square. Blocks outside these parameters will not be considered for the Courthouse quilt.
  • All piecing methods are welcome (with the exception of raw-edged applique)
    • The hope is to receive many types of blocks which somehow represent the theme. Sewing styles may include modern piecing, traditional piecing, paper piecing, non-raw edge applique, art quilt blocks, etc.  
  • Quilt blocks should be inspired by the theme “Boulder County: Strong and Beautiful”
    • The theme can be taken literally: paper-pieced mountains, animals, foliage, scenes native to Boulder County, Colo. etc. The theme may also be demonstrated more abstractly: use the provided color palette in unique ways, through improv piecing, wonky log cabins, etc.  
  • The color palette chosen for this quilt represent many of the colors commonly associated with Colorado, and are hues which complement one another. The palette of chosen colors was chosen from Robert Kaufman Kona Solids, but quilters are not limited to using solids, or this brand. Prints that read as solid/one-color, batiks that resemble the chosen solids or any combination of the above fabrics are all welcome. 
    • The Kona solids chosen for this quilt, are as follows:
      • Red
      • Carnation
      • Tangerine
      • Corn Yellow
      • Clover
      • Forest
      • Lagoon
      • Robin Egg
      • Mulberry
      • Crocus
      • Chocolate
      • Taupe
      • Snow
  • Pre-made bundles of fabric will be available at the following locations:  
    • Brick and Mortar Locations (will have bundles inspired by the provided palette):
      • Fabricate, 2023 17th St., Boulder, CO
      • Lyons Quilting, 216 E. Main St., Lyons, CO
    • Online Retailers:
      • PinkChalkFabrics.com will have the 13 Kona cotton solids in a fat quarter bundle.
      • eQuilter.com will have a bundle available online inspired by the chosen palette
  • Blocks chosen for the quilt to hang in the Courthouse will be chosen by committee. The committee will determine winners by their adherence to the theme and color palette, as well as craftsmanship.
    • Many blocks received by the committee will be photographed and displayed on the project website.
    • Blocks not chosen for the Courthouse quilt will be used to create other items for flood survivors. Boulder County reserves the right to refrain from using a block for any reason.
  • Submissions do not have to be from a resident of Boulder County, or the state of Colorado.
  • Quilters may mail any number of blocks, but it is likely that only one block per individual will make it into the Courthouse quilt.  
  • Blocks should be mailed to:
Boulder County Flood Recovery Quilt 
c/o Katie Arrington, Flood Recovery Center 
2045 13th Street, Boulder, CO 80306
  • Blocks must be received by July 11, 2014.
  • All blocks must be received with a submission form.
    • If you are sending multiple blocks, please send one submission form per block.
Applications will be made available online by June 1 for any individuals who would like to volunteer to help construct the quilt top (sash the 30 quilt squares together and add borders). Applications will also be available for volunteers to do the actual quilting of the quilt as well as applications for volunteers to bind the quilt. 

For more information contact Katie Arrington at 303-441-1609 or karrington@bouldercounty.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4024Mon, 28 Apr 2014 10:00:00
UPDATE ON CYCLING RESTRICTIONS: Fourmile Canyon Drive and Gold Run Road closed to cyclists starting Monday; Lefthand Canyon Drive to reopen on Thursday Boulder County, Colo. – As flood hazard mitigation crews wrap up work in Lefthand Canyon, high hazard zone mitigation operations are now moving into Fourmile Canyon. To help accommodate crews and create safe work zones, Boulder County is restricting cycling on Fourmile Canyon and Gold Run roads, starting at Boulder Canyon Drive. This closure begins Monday, April 28 and is expected to last until mid- to late-May.

Lefthand Canyon Drive is still expected to reopen to cyclists on Thursday, May 1; however, in order to accommodate ongoing work in James Canyon and Jamestown, cyclists are encouraged to avoid the area as large trucks and heavy machinery continue to work on repair and recovery operations. 

In order to expedite the remediation of high hazard areas along Fourmile Creek, Boulder County is asking cyclists to respect the temporary restrictions. Motorists are also asked to avoid the area unless travel is necessary.

“We know how important cycling is to Boulder County residents and visitors, which is why we’re trying to get these areas open as soon as possible,” said Transportation Director George Gerstle. “I’d like to personally thank the cycling community for their continued patience and understanding while we work to make these areas safe for everyone.”

Residents who need to ride a bike in this area for basic transportation purposes can contact the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office at 303-441-3650 for a permit.

For more information on this work, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at 303-441-1032.
 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4021Fri, 25 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Intersection of 63rd Street and Jay Road to be repaved starting MondayExpect delays when traveling through the area

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County contractors will begin repaving the intersection at 63rd Street and Jay Road at 8 a.m. on Monday, April 28. Motorists, cyclists and pedestrians can expect delays along both roadways in all directions, likely through the evening commute. Boulder County Transportation encourages all travelers to avoid the area, if possible.

The county will attempt to complete the repaving project in one day, weather permitting, but it may be necessary to continue the work into Tuesday, April 29. If the project is extended, work will begin at 8 a.m. on Tuesday.

The repaving operation is part of the county’s annual roadway maintenance plan. The new surface is expected to improve current driving conditions and extend the life of this section of roadway by 20 to 30 years. 

For more information on the project, contact Andrew Barth, Transportation Department communications specialist, at abarth@bouldercounty.org or call 303-441-1032. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=4017Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Nederland and Allenspark Community Forestry Sort Yards Open Extended sort yard hours provide landowners double the opportunity to implement effective wildfire mitigation on their land.

Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Forest Health Initiative is pleased to announce expanded Community Forestry Sort Yard operating hours for 2014. Both the Allenspark and Nederland area sort yards will be open for a majority of the summer.  

This summer marks the seventh consecutive year that Boulder County has operated sort yards in the mountains. Landowners can drop off slash and logs free of charge at either sort yard location. The sort yard program has proven to be an extremely valuable resource for area residents. Last year 629 landowners dropped material off at the sort yards. 

“We are excited to offer residents a significantly longer operational schedule in 2014. Each year residents have been asking for additional hours and we are finally able to accommodate their request,” said Ryan Ludlow, outreach forester with the county’s Land Use Department. “We are hopeful the extended hours will provide residents even more opportunity to get out on their land and create effective wildfire mitigation and to battle bark beetle infestations.” 

Allenspark/Meeker Park Area Sort Yard - 8200 Hwy 7, Allenspark
  • Opens: May 1st – Closes: Oct. 18th
  • Hours of Operation: Wednesday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Nederland Area Sort Yard - 291 Ridge Road, Nederland 
  • Opens: May 7th – Closes: Oct. 18th
  • Hours of Operation: Wednesday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Both sort yards will be closed on July 4 and 5th and may have additional closures due to weather and administrative requirements. To check the operational status, please call 303-678-6368.

We need your help – Volunteer as a Community Forestry Sort Yard Host!
Volunteer Sort Yard Hosts are needed at the Allenspark and Nederland Community Forestry Sort Yard to make sure that the yards continue to be a local hub of community-based forestry information. 

Volunteer Sort Yard Hosts will greet people as they enter the yard, collect data on the material they are delivering, and provide outreach to sort yard users about forest ecology, bark beetles, and wildfire mitigation. Volunteers will not be responsible for helping unload logs and slash. 

We are looking for individuals who can commit 10-15 hours per month in 4 hour shifts on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Ideal volunteers will be able to commit to volunteering for at least 12 weeks during the sort yard season. For more information and/or to receive an application, contact Shane Milne at 303-678-6089 or smilne@bouldercounty.org.  

For more information about the sort yard program or how to implement proactive wildfire mitigation on your land, contact Ryan Ludlow, Boulder County Forest Health Initiative’s outreach forester, at 720-564-2641 or rludlow@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3999Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Status of Sunset St. (Longmont) Bridge Replacement City of Longmont                                        Boulder County
Civic Center Complex                                 Boulder County Courthouse        
350 Kimbark St.                                           1325 Pearl St.
Longmont, CO  80501                                 Boulder, CO 80302

CONTACT: Rigo Leal, Longmont Public Information Officer, 303-651-8840
                   Barb Halpin, Boulder County Public Information Officer, 303-441-1622               

Longmont, Colo. – The City of Longmont and Boulder County are joining forces to plan the replacement of the Sunset Street Bridge that was damaged during the September 2013 flood.

The bridge, located on Sunset St. between 3rd Avenue and Boston Avenue in Longmont, is owned by Boulder County but due to its location serves primarily city residents and businesses as an important north-south connection over the St. Vrain Creek.

The two government agencies have agreed to work together on this project through an intergovernmental agreement (IGA), signed in October 2013. The agreement stipulates that Boulder County will take the lead on funding the project and the City of Longmont will manage the design and construction.

Sunset Street is classified as a federal-aid roadway, meaning that funding for flood repairs will come from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and not from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Boulder County is working with the FHWA to secure federal “Emergency Relief” funds for the bridge replacement, which would fund up to 82% of the estimated $2 to $3 million replacement cost. Boulder County and the City of Longmont have agreed to share the cost of any funds not provided by FHWA.

“The City and the County are very intertwined at this location,” says Boulder County Transportation Director George Gerstle, “and we welcome this partnership to replace the washed out structure with a more complete facility that will serve cars, bikes and pedestrians for many decades to come.” 

This section of Sunset Street remains in the unincorporated County along with several of the properties on the corridor. But the city owns many of the properties north of the bridge along with the St. Vrain Greenway bike trail that runs underneath the bridge.

City and County leaders determined that temporary repairs to make the bridge passable are impractical for two reasons. First, temporary repairs could not guarantee safe passage over the bridge and second, temporary repairs would cost approximately $350,000. In the interest of public safety and fiscal responsibility, both agencies agreed that resources should be focused on a permanent solution.

“In our estimation, the bridge is damaged beyond repair,” Longmont Public Works Director, Dale Rademacher, said. “It does not make sense to apply a temporary fix. The bridge has to be torn out and replaced.”

According to Boulder County Planner Tim Swope, the normal timeframe for designing and constructing a bridge like this would normally take three to four years. “We are condensing that timeframe by half,” he said. “We’re hoping to have a new bridge up and running sometime in 2015.”

The Sunset Street Bridge was built in 1958 and was already at the end of its expected life span. Discussions were under way for bridge replacement before the flood hit Longmont last year. The flood damage has expedited those discussions.

Before a new bridge can be built, various regulatory conditions must be met.

“Many people are understandably concerned about the lack of repair activity on the bridge,” Longmont City Manager, Harold Dominguez, said, “but there are many moving parts that have to be finalized before we can begin design and construction.” The County and City are working closely together to follow all federal regulations and ensure funding for the project. As necessary funding is secured, work can begin.

“The discussions with FHWA are on-going” says Swope, “FHWA wants to ensure that the federal dollars are well spent and we want to make sure that the finished product is worth the wait.”

In addition to funding, another complicating factor is that the new bridge needs to be designed to withstand the 100-year flood flow. This requires building a bridge that is significantly larger than the old one to mitigate flood impacts and prevent a similar catastrophe from occurring in the future. Beyond new design and engineering work, the improved bridge will also require private property land acquisition before construction can begin.

“We ask the public for patience as we complete this multi-phased process,” Dominguez added. “Smart planning and investment now will positively serve the community for decades to come.”

In addition to withstanding higher flow volumes, the improved Sunset Street Bridge will also provide greater vehicle capacity as well as the addition of bicycle lanes and sidewalks.


 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3969Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County seeks resident input for general election Voter Service and Polling Center locationsLocal voters requested to take online survey

Boulder County, Colo. – This fall will be the first general election carried out after the passage of last year’s Colorado Voter Access and Modernized Election Act. The law changes the Colorado election process to provide all mail ballot elections, same-day voter registration and resident access to Voter Service and Polling Centers.

The Boulder County Elections Division is conducting outreach to residents to ask local voters where they would like to access a Voter Service and Polling Center. The Elections Division will continue to utilize all Boulder County Clerk and Recorder offices for this service during the election, but we anticipate the outreach will garner new location ideas that may not have been previously considered. 

To capture resident input, we have designed an online survey. We will be collecting survey responses through Tuesday, Feb. 25:

What: Online resident input survey 

When: Available for input until Feb. 25

Who: Boulder County voters

Where: www.BoulderCountyVotes.org  or www.surveymonkey.com/s/BoulderCountyElectionsSurvey  

The Clerk & Recorder’s Office is also using this opportunity to seek ideas on ballot drop-off locations as well as input on whether residents would utilize 24-hour ballot drop-boxes prior to the election.

Voter Service and Polling Centers are places residents can drop off a mail ballot, cast a ballot in person, request a replacement ballot, register to vote or update registration information, or vote using equipment for persons with disabilities. Boulder County will have 13 Voter Service open throughout the county on Election Day with some locations opening up to two weeks early.

For additional information on elections in Boulder County, visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org.

-BoulderCountyVotes.org-

-Twitter: @BoCoClerk-


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3933Thu, 13 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners appoint new Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District Advisory Committee

The citizen-led SPLIDAC will convene in February to begin making recommendations for prioritization of repaving projects under the LID

 

Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Commissioners have appointed members of the Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District Advisory Committee (SPLIDAC).

 

This citizen-led advisory board will serve as an independent committee to provide the Boulder County Commissioners and the Boulder County Transportation Department with recommendations regarding administration of the Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District (LID). The LID was finalized by the Board of County Commissioners in November 2013 with the anticipation of beginning road improvement projects in unincorporated county subdivisions in 2014.

 

Of the 23 applications received, the following seven committee members and three alternates were appointed:

 

Appointed

·         Kim Hedberg             Valle Del Rio (Small Subdivision, 2-year term)

·         Vince Hirsch               Boulder Heights (Mountain Area, 1-year term)

·         Peter King-Smith        Pine Brook Hills (Mountain Area, 3-year term)

·         Robert Loveman         Pine Brook Hills (Mountain Area, 2-year term)

·         Bill Gannon                (Plains Area, 1-year term) (Replacement for Timm Morrison who resigned 2/25/14)

·         Richard Piland            Overbrook (Plains Area, 3-year term)

·         Robert Schuetze           Gunbarrel Green (Plains Area, 2-year term)

 

Alternates – all 1-year terms

·         Richard Blanchette     Crestview Estates – Mountain Area Alternate

·         Jeff Wagener              Eldorado Springs – Small Subdivision  Alternate

·         Charles Wibby           South Meadow Gunbarrel Green – Plains Area Alternate

 

Terms will be held for one, two or three years in order to stagger appointments for the 15-year project. The County Commissioners based their appointment selections on a number of factors, including:

 

·         Geographical diversity (i.e., a cross representation of plains, mountains, mix of small and large subdivisions)

·         Knowledge, skills, expertise, and demonstrated ability to work with a wide set of issues and financial complexity in an advisory board capacity

·         Diversity of opinions and self-identified challenges and ideas put forward by the applicants in relation to communicating SPLIDAC recommendations to impacted residents

·         Availability to serve regularly on the SPLIDAC, and in particular, availability to make more frequent meeting dates for the first few months of the appointment

 

The first meeting will be scheduled in mid-February with more frequent meetings established in the first few months to get the new advisory committee members up-to-speed with matters related to budgets and the comparison of paving needs and priorities, and in order to make the most use of favorable road reconstruction conditions in 2014.

 

Three alternates, each assigned to a specific geographic region, were appointed to ensure that the different perspectives will be represented as decisions are made, should a particular member not be able to attend a meeting. In most cases, alternate members indicated during their interviews that they had travel schedules that would conflict with initial meeting dates in February and March, a critical timeframe for getting the advisory board up and running.

 

The alternates will have voting rights only when filling in for an appointed member.

 

The newly-appointed advisory committee represents many different opinions and ideas on how the LID should move forward, and the County Commissioners were extremely pleased with the caliber of applicants and the level of personal commitment demonstrated throughout the interview process.
 

All SPLIDAC meetings are open to the public and there will be opportunity for public comment. A calendar of meetings is posted on the SPLIDAC web page.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3925Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Public Health provides overdose prevention trainingBoulder County, Colo. – Each day in the United States, more than 100 people die as a result of drug overdose. On October 28, 2013, Boulder County Public Health launched a new program aimed at saving lives and reversing this trend. The program provides training and overdose prevention kits containing lifesaving medication. Ten people participated in the first training and received the kits.

Rates of drug overdose have increased dramatically in the past decade, with drug overdose surpassing motor vehicle accidents as the leading cause of accidental death. Overdose deaths in the U.S. involving opioid analgesics, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone, have increased from 4,030 deaths in 1999 to 16,651 in 2010. In fact, Colorado Governor Hickenlooper declared August 31, 2013, as “Drug Overdose Awareness Day.”

“Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a healthy life, including people who use drugs,” said Carol Helwig, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease Control Program coordinator. “This program is one way to support people who are so often stigmatized in our community.”

Each overdose prevention kit contains Naloxone, also known as Narcan, which can reverse the effects of a drug overdose from opiates, including heroin and prescription opiates, such as Percocet or Oxycontin.

To receive the overdose prevention kit, participants must complete the training session, which focuses on learning the signs of overdose. Signs of overdose include: 

  • Not responsive to sound or pain, such as a sternum rub
  • Not breathing
  • Blue lips or fingertips 
  • Loud gurgling sounds

Important life-saving steps are also reviewed in the training, including calling 911, making sure the airway is clear, pinching the nose and providing a rescue breath every 5 seconds (no chest compressions), and administering naloxone.

The overdose prevention program is a collaborative effort between two Boulder County Public Health programs – the Addiction Recovery Centers (ARC) and The Works (i.e. syringe access) program – and the Denver-based Harm Reduction Action Center (HRAC), which is the largest syringe access provider in the state. HRAC has provided training and naloxone kits to 165 individuals in Colorado; of those trained, HRAC has received 52 reports of instances when naloxone was used to reverse a life-threatening overdose. 

People interested in participating in the overdose prevention program can call the Boulder County Addiction Recovery Centers at 303.441.1281.

Background

The ARC focuses on providing treatment for individuals struggling to reduce their use and abuse of drugs and alcohol. They offer several medication-assisted treatment options that combine the latest in pharmaceutical and cognitive behavioral therapies. The combination of appropriate medication with group and individual therapy has been shown to increase the amount of time clients remain drug-free. For more information about treatment options, call 303.441.1281 or visit www.BoulderCountyARC.org.

The Works Program provides harm reduction supplies and education, HIV and hepatitis C testing and counseling, and immunizations for hepatitis A and B. Supplies, education, and testing are available at Boulder County Public Health offices located in Boulder and Longmont, as well as at the Boulder County AIDS Project (BCAP) in Boulder. For more information about The Works Program or locations, call 303-413-7500 or visit www.BoulderCountyWorks.org.


 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3841Wed, 13 Nov 2013 10:00:00
Boulder County mailing ballots to voters todayBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is mailing ballots today to active, registered voters for the 2013 Coordinated Election.

So far, 199,968 Boulder County voters are set to receive mail ballots for the Tuesday, Nov. 5, election. A ballot will be sent to each active, registered voter. Each mail ballot packet includes a list of Voter Service and Polling Centers and ballot drop-off points that will open between now and Election Day. After returning their ballot, voters can check BoulderCountyVotes.org to make sure it was received.

Boulder County voters have the choice of voting by mail ballot, or at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day. They can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.

Voters who aren’t registered can still register to vote until 7 p.m. on Election Day under a new state law passed earlier this year. Visit GoVoteColorado.com with a Colorado ID or driver’s license to register online no later than Monday, Oct. 28. Or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center by 7 p.m. on Election Day to register and get a ballot.

If you have been displaced by recent flooding and have not been receiving your mail at your registered address, you might not automatically receive a ballot because ballots are not forwardable mail. However, you are still eligible to vote. Please visit www.GoVoteColorado.com to confirm or update your mailing address by Oct. 28 to receive a mail ballot, or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center through 7 p.m. on Election Day to update your voter information and obtain a ballot. 

*Note: The Elections Division mailed 2,741 ballots to voters displaced by flooding in Jamestown and Lyons on Oct. 9. The measure should help ensure elections staff can identify and reach out to voters who have changed their address and must update their registration before receiving a mail ballot.

Key Dates for the 2013 Coordinated Election:
  • Tuesday, Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to all active, registered voters. 
  • Monday, Oct. 28: Last day to register to vote online for the coordinated election. New this year, voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 5: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3795Tue, 15 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Equipment testing completed for 2013 electionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in Boulder County’s Nov. 5 Coordinated Election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test held this week.

Participants representing local municipalities and districts took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office. The tests confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes. 

The LAT also checked and confirmed that ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. The test included paper, electronic and audio ballots.

Total ballots tested: 1,163
Paper ballots: 1,058 
    • 80 by district and municipality participants
    • 978 by Elections Division staff
Electronic ballots (includes audio ballots): 105
    • 56 by district and municipality participants
    • 49 by Elections Division staff
Results and test records will be available for review next week at BoulderCountyVotes.org. Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the coordinated election.

Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check your registration or learn more about the election, and call 303-413-7740 or email Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org if you have questions. 

Key Dates for the 2013 Coordinated Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to all active, registered voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 28: Last day to register to vote online for the coordinated election. New this year, voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day.
• Tuesday, Nov. 5: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3793Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Clerk & Recorder's Louisville Office to Close July 18; Will Reopen July 23 at New Lafayette LocationBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office has selected the July moving dates for its East County office.

The last day of business at the Louisville office, 722 Main St., will be Thursday, July 18. The office will be open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. that day. The office will reopen at its new Lafayette location, 1376 Miners Drive, at 8 a.m. Tuesday, July 23. 
The East County office will be closed on Friday, July 19, and Monday, July 22, for employees to move and set up equipment. The Clerk & Recorder’s other branches at 1750 33rd St. in Boulder and 529 Coffman St. in Longmont will remain open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on those days.

The move comes after the recent sale of the building at 722 Main St. in Louisville, where the Clerk and Recorder’s office has leased space for more than 20 years. The new owners plan to repurpose the building and asked Boulder County to relocate.

The new Lafayette office will include a larger waiting area for the public, improved parking and better access for clients with disabilities. The new building will feature a large conference room that can be used as a voting center during elections.

The Lafayette building will also serve as an alternate worksite for the Assessor, Treasurer and other administrative offices, which are relocating from a county-owned building at 400 E. Simpson St. in Lafayette. 


- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk  - 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3632Tue, 11 Jun 2013 10:00:00
Final Unofficial Results Posted for 2012 General ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's office has posted the final unofficial vote tally for the 2012 General Election. Results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

The Boulder County Elections Division added 2,684 additional ballots to the tally today, for a total of 180,712 ballots counted for the Nov. 6 election. 

The ballots added today include provisional ballots, which have been under review by Elections Division staff since the day after Election Day. The staff reviews provisional ballots to make sure the voter was eligible to cast the ballot. The office reviewed the eligibility of 3,255 provisional ballots. Tuesday was the last day to verify and count provisional ballots.

The election results released today are technically “final unofficial” results. Results will be official after they are submitted to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office.

More election information: 303-413-7740 or BoulderCountyVotes.org.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3388Wed, 21 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Final Unofficial Results Available for 2012 General ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division has finished tallying votes for the 2012 General Election. Final unofficial election results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

The Elections Division has finished tallying the preliminary results of 174,364 ballots. Voter turnout for the General Election is 92.7 percent of 187,962 active registered voters in Boulder County. 

Letters are being mailed to mail-in ballot voters who need to cure their signatures or provide a photocopy of their ID in order for their votes to be counted. Voters can check their information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify whether their signature or ID was accepted. The deadline for voters to provide their signature or photocopy of ID is 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14.

Boulder County elections staff will also being reviewing and verifying provisional ballots, which will be added to the final election tally on Tuesday, Nov. 20. About 3,000 provisional ballots were cast on Election Day. A definitive tally of provisional ballots will be released later this week.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3367Wed, 07 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Most Mail-in Voters Should Have Their BallotVoters who requested a mail-in ballot before Oct. 9 should have their ballots for the upcoming election.

Voters who have not received their mail-in ballot, would like to request one, or have questions about their ballot can email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org or call 303-413-7740. Mail-in ballot requests received since Oct. 9 should be fulfilled in the next week.

Each mailed ballot packet includes a list of ballot drop-off points. A full list is also available at BoulderCountyVotes.org. For most Boulder County voters, postage for returning a ballot will cost 45 cents. However, voters who need to provide a photocopy of their ID with their returned mail ballot should affix 65 cents postage on the envelope. (Only about 3 percent of mail ballot voters fall into the ID-required category.) Postage is also explained on the instruction sheet included with each mail ballot.
 
Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 
  
Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Mail ballots sent to voters who requested them.
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Oct. 30: Last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election if the ballot is mailed.
• Friday, Nov. 2: Last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election if the ballot is picked up at the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s office.
• Friday, Nov. 2: Last day for early voting.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3347Tue, 23 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Out of Town on Election Day? You Have Options.Boulder County – Planning to be out of town on Election Day? The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office offers several options for travelers, overseas military, college students and others who can’t vote in person on Tuesday, Nov. 6:

  • Vote by mail-in ballot. If you aren’t signed up to vote by mail-in ballot, it’s not too late. Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org soon to request one. Then vote and return it to a drop-off site or Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office by 7 p.m. on Election Day. 
  • Vote at an early voting location . If you’d prefer not to receive a mail-in ballot but won’t be in town to head to your polling place on Election Day, early voting is a great option. Early voting begins Monday, Oct. 22, at our Boulder and Longmont branch offices. Additional early voting locations will open Oct. 29 in Boulder, Lafayette and Longmont. Early voting runs through Friday, Nov. 2. 
  • Request an overseas/military ballot. If you’ll be out of the country altogether, you can still request a ballot and receive it via snail mail or email – but contact us soon, because mailing a ballot overseas takes extra time. These voters have until Nov. 14 to return their ballots as long as they’re postmarked no later than Nov. 6.

Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to learn more about these options, or call 303-413-7740 for more information. You can also visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to ballot content and learn more about local elections. 

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3334Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Series of Four Boulder County "Election Labs" Open to PublicBoulder County  – The Boulder County Elections Division will host series of “Election Labs” this month to train new judges in helping polling place voters for Election Day. The election labs will simulate what a polling place will look like on Nov. 6. The events will be open to the public, including first-time voters who’d like to know what to expect at their polling place on Election Day. 

Scheduled Locations, Times and Dates:

Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street, Boulder
6 - 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17    
5 - 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 

Boulder County Parks & Open Space, 5201 St. Vrain Road, Longmont
4 - 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20  
1 - 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk - 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3333Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming electionBoulder County  – The Boulder County Elections Division will conduct a logic and accuracy test next week on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2012 general election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public, including representatives of local political parties and the media.

Scheduled Dates and Times: 
10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9;
9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, and Thursday, Oct. 11.
(The public may also observe a day of pre-testing preparation on Monday, Oct. 8, beginning at 9 a.m.)

Location: 
Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.

After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Last day to register to vote for the general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3318Tue, 02 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Deadline Approaching: Tuesday, Oct. 9 is Last Day to Register to VoteBoulder County – If you aren’t registered to vote, you have just one week left to do so if you’d like to cast a ballot in the general election.

Tuesday, Oct. 9, is the last day to register to vote for the Nov. 6 election. 

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. 

They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3315Mon, 01 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Watch for Voter Information Postcard in Your Mailbox This WeekBoulder County – Voters should check their mailboxes this week for postcards detailing key information on how to cast a ballot in the Nov. 6 general election.

About 175,000 voters in Boulder County will receive the postcards from the Clerk & Recorder’s Office.

For voters who’ve signed up to receive a mail ballot, each postcard gives the voter’s precinct number and tells them to watch for their mail ballot during the week of Oct. 15. About 113,000 Boulder County voters will receive this card.

For polling place voters, the card gives the voter’s precinct number, designated Election Day polling place and details about early voting, which begins the week of Oct. 22. About 62,000 Boulder County voters will receive this card.

Residents who have not registered to vote will not receive a postcard, though they can still register by Oct. 9 and cast a ballot in the election.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections.

They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Last day to register to vote if you want to participate in the Nov. 6 general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3310Tue, 25 Sep 2012 10:00:00
Statement from Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall on Dismissal of Court CaseBoulder County – U.S. District Judge Christine Arguello this morning dismissed the Citizen Center v. Gessler case, in which Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall had been named as a defendant. The court also denied a related motion for a preliminary injunction that could have prevented Boulder County from printing its ballots as planned for the Nov. 6 general election. The Boulder County Elections Division will proceed with its plan to print ballots.

Clerk Hall offered the following response to the judge’s ruling: 

"We’ve always worked very hard to ensure election integrity in Boulder County. We’ve designed paper ballots that will keep your vote anonymous and allow for efficient, accurate tallying on Election Night. Earlier this year, I helped draft legislation to create a process that lets the public review voted ballots after an election. And Boulder County has one of the most advanced and thorough post-election audits in the U.S. 

"I’m happy the judge’s decision will allow us to continue our work as planned. The dismissal of the case is a relief because it will allow me to devote more of my time to overseeing our preparations for the general election." 

For more on Boulder County’s ballot design and printing process, see Hall’s recent op-ed.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Deadline to register to voter if wish to cast a ballot in the Nov. 6 general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk




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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3305Fri, 21 Sep 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County's Primary Election Audit Open to PublicBoulder County – The public is invited to observe Boulder County’s enhanced audit for the 2012 primary election beginning Saturday at noon. The audit is a post-election quality assurance test that ensures the accuracy of the machine tally of votes.

Boulder County’s enhanced audit uses randomly selected ballots from all scanning systems and compares a manual tally of votes with the actual election-night machine tally of the same ballots. Any discrepancy is investigated. A final report is issued to the Boulder County Canvass Board for verification before the election is certified.

Members of the public can observe the audit process at the Boulder County Ballot Processing Center, 1750 33rd St., Boulder. Contests and ballot batches will be randomly selected from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Ballots will be manually tallied and compared with machines tallies from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday. The audit will continue from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday or until the test is finished.

Complete audit details and data will be available at BoulderCountyVotes.org by 5 p.m. Friday, July 6.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3187Thu, 28 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to host primary election open houseBoulder County – Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will host a primary election open house from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 25, at the Ballot Processing Center, 1750 33rd St. in Boulder.

The event offers people interested in local elections a chance to see how ballots are processed and learn more about Boulder County’s elections procedures. Hall will explain how the mail-ballot primary is being conducted and answer questions. Visitors will be able to observe workers processing early-return ballots for the June 26 primary election. 

This election is being conducted entirely by mail ballot. Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, find a service center or ballot drop-off site, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 

They can also call 303-413-7740 or email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org for information or visit one of three Boulder County election service centers.
  
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
• Tuesday, June 19: Last day to request a replacement ballot if you’d like to receive it by mail. 
• Monday, June 18, through Tuesday, June 26: Voters requesting a replacement ballot can apply for and receive one in person at one of three service centers. 
• Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3174Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Affiliated Boulder County Voters: You Should Have Your Primary Ballot
Boulder County – Eligible, affiliated voters should have their mail ballots for the 2012 Boulder County primary election.

Voters affiliated with the Democratic, Republican and American Constitution parties may vote in the June 26 primary. Voters who have not received a primary ballot or who have questions about their ballot can email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org or call 303-413-7740.

The June 26 primary election is being conducted entirely by mail ballot. Each mailed ballot packet includes a list of ballot drop-off points and service centers that will open next week.
 
Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 
  
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
• Tuesday, June 19: Last day to request a replacement ballot if you’d like to receive it by mail. 
• Monday, June 18, through Tuesday, June 26: Voters requesting a replacement ballot can apply for and receive one in person at one of three service centers. 
• Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3163Tue, 12 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Sheriff Pelle Expands Fire BanFROM:            SHERIFF JOE PELLE

REF:                NEW AND ADDITIONAL FIRE RESTRICTIONS

EFFECTIVE:   JUNE 11, 2012 5 P.M.

 

 

Ongoing dry and windy conditions, and Red Flag Warnings on a daily basis, have pushed us into extreme fire danger regionally and county-wide.  Additionally, huge fires in Larimer County, Wyoming, New Mexico, and throughout other parts of the State have strained fire-fighting resources locally and regionally.

 

The forecast shows no signs of immediate relief.

 

With these conditions in mind, we are upgrading our current ban on open-fires.  Effective at 5pm today, there will be no open burning of any kind allowed anywhere in unincorporated Boulder County.  This includes slash piles, agricultural burning, camp fires, bon fires, charcoal grills, etc. regardless of location, (mountains or plains). Only liquid gas or propane fired cooking stoves will be allowed for outdoor use. The use and sale of fireworks is also banned throughout the unincorporated county.

 

Violation of this order may result in a $500 fine for the first offense and escalates with subsequent violations. 

 

Deputies will begin enforcing this resolution tonight, and informing campground hosts, etc. of the new rules while they make their rounds. 
 
-www.BoulderSheriff.org-
 
Reference:  Amended Fire Ban (6/11/12)
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3159Mon, 11 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Equipment testing complete for June 26 primary electionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in the county’s upcoming mail-ballot primary election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test held Wednesday and Thursday.

Representatives from the local Democratic and Republican parties took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office that confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes. 

The LAT also confirmed ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. The test included mail-in, electronic and audio ballots. In all, 3,454 ballots were tested, including 3,379 paper ballots and 75 electronic ballots on voting machines. 
 
Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the primary election.
 
Results and test records are available for review at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
The June 26 primary election is being conducted by mail ballot. Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check your registration or learn more about the election, and call 303-413-7740 or email Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org if you have questions. 
 
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
Friday, May 25: Last day for voters to change or withdraw from party affiliation before the primary.
Tuesday, May 29: Last day to register to vote for the primary election.
Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3131Fri, 25 May 2012 10:00:00
Time running out to change affiliation, register to vote for primary election

Boulder County  – Residents who plan to cast a ballot in the June 26 primary election have just a few days left to change party affiliation or register to vote. 

Republican, Democratic, American Constitution and minor party members who’d like to change their party affiliation before the primary must do so no later than Friday, May 25. Unregistered voters who’d like to register to vote and participate in the primary must do so no later than Tuesday, May 29. 

Unaffiliated voters may affiliate with a party and participate in its primary up to and including Primary Election Day on June 26.

Voters who have moved since the previous election should update their registration if they plan to vote in the primary.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The upcoming primary election will be conducted by mail ballot. Only affiliated voters will receive a ballot. Primary Election Day is June 26, but voters will begin receiving their ballots during the week of June 4. Each ballot packet will include details about expanded Clerk & Recorder’s office hours, election service centers and ballot drop-off sites for the June primary.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3123Fri, 18 May 2012 10:00:00
Deadlines Approaching to Change Affiliation, Register to Vote for PrimaryBoulder County  – Residents who plan to cast a ballot in the June 26 primary election have a few weeks left to change party affiliation or register to vote. 

Republicans, Democrats and American Constitution Party members who’d like to change their party affiliation before the primary must do so no later than Friday, May 25. Unregistered voters who’d like to register to vote and participate in the primary must do so no later than Tuesday, May 29. Voters who have moved since the previous election should update their registration if they plan to vote in the primary.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
 
The upcoming primary election will be conducted by mail ballot. Only affiliated voters will receive a ballot. Primary Election Day is June 26, but voters will begin receiving their ballots during the week of June 4. Each ballot packet will include details about expanded Clerk & Recorder’s office hours, election service centers and ballot drop-off sites for the June primary.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3116Fri, 11 May 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to Test Ballots and Equipment for Upcoming Primary ElectionBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Elections Division beginning Wednesday, May 23, will conduct a logic and accuracy test on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2012 primary election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public, including representatives of local political parties and the media.

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, through Friday, May 25 (or until testing concludes). A pre-testing setup day is also open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 22.

Where: Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.

After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org

For more elections information, including ballot content for the June 26 primary, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org.

Other Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:

  • Friday, May 25: Last day for voters to change or withdraw major party affiliation before the primary.
  • Tuesday, May 29: Last day to register to vote for the primary election.
  • Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.

-BoulderCountyVotes.org-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3113Monday, May 08, 2012
Boulder County to Conduct 2012 Primary Election by Mail Ballot

Boulder County – The Board of County Commissioners today approved Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall’s plan to conduct a mail ballot election with service centers for the 2012 primary election. 

Boulder County’s Elections Division examined several factors to decide how to conduct this year’s June 26 primary election, including voting method preferences in Boulder County, turnout, costs, and comments received from the public. 

The county conducted its first mail-ballot primary in 2010, and has conducted odd-year elections by mail ballot since 2001. Election officials estimate they saved $180,000 by conducting the 2010 primary as an all-mail ballot election rather than a polling place election.

The 2010 primary also saw an increase in voter turnout consistent with mail ballot elections. Turnout grew from 29 percent in the 2008 polling place primary to 43 percent in the 2010 mail ballot primary. 

Of about 97,000 active registered voters affiliated with a political party in Boulder County, about 67,000 have signed up as permanent mail-in voters. Of the roughly 145,000 active registered voters in Boulder County, about 95,000 are PMIVs.

Primary ballots will be mailed beginning June 4. Several service centers will be available in Boulder County from June 18-26 for voters to vote in person, update their registration, drop off voted ballots or request replacement ballots.

The deadline for affiliated voters to change their affiliation to vote in the primary election, or to withdraw their affiliation, is May 25. The deadline to register to vote is May 29.

Voters can check their registration information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify update their registration, address information and affiliation. 

- www.BoulderCountyVotes.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=3005Thu, 16 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County statement on oil and gas drilling from Commissioners Cindy Domenico, Will Toor and Deb Gardner:Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is concerned about the potential for significantly expanded oil and gas drilling within the county, and supports appropriate, tighter restrictions on drilling and increased local control to mitigate the impacts of these activities.

However, Boulder County and other local governments in Colorado do not have complete authority to regulate drilling. In order to ensure both our Comprehensive Plan and Land Use regulations are as thorough and up-to-date as possible, today we approved a temporary moratorium on the processing of the required development plans for local oil and gas permits under the county Land Use Code (Resolution 2012-16). This will give us time to make sure that, within the limits of our legal authority, we are able to mitigate local impacts from these activities and to maximize protection for the people and environment of Boulder County.

Boulder County does not voluntarily allow oil and gas drilling on its open space properties. Like many private landowners, we often do not own the rights to a given property’s oil and gas deposits. In other cases, the mineral rights were leased prior to acquisition of the land by the county. In those instances, the county does not have the ability to prohibit drilling, even though it is the surface landowner. As the surface owner, we do negotiate surface use agreements prior to drilling, and in doing so, we attempt to minimize those impacts to the maximum extent possible.

Through our Land Use Code, we do have some local authority over oil and gas drilling on private and public land; however, substantial authority for regulation of oil and gas operations lies with the state and federal governments, so there are limits on what we can restrict. For instance, it is unlikely that Boulder County could simply prohibit hydraulic fracturing on either public or private land in the county.

Boulder County has and is actively supporting efforts to strengthen state regulation, and to expand local authority in the area of oil and gas drilling. We supported legislation signed by former Gov. Bill Ritter to strengthen oil and gas rules and to reform the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. We have also advocated for a stronger disclosure requirements of fracking fluids, although the COGCC ultimately approved requirements that did not include our requests for a process that would allow any leaks to be traced, nor for pre- and post-drilling water monitoring. Finally, we are supportive of legislation that Rep. Matt Jones of Louisville is sponsoring in the 2012 General Assembly to expand local authority over drilling.

We also authorized staff to set a public hearing for Thursday, March 1 to take public testimony on the local impacts associated with oil and gas development, and on the appropriateness of continuing or amending the temporary moratorium on the processing of land use applications for oil and gas development which we approved today. This meeting will begin at 4 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room on the third floor of the Boulder County Courthouse at 1325 Pearl St. in Boulder. Staff from several county departments will be making presentations regarding our current regulations and the development we have seen on our open space properties.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2986Thu, 02 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Elections Division Seeks Input on Proposed Mail Ballot Primary ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is collecting public comments on its proposal to conduct the June 26 primary election by mail ballot.

Members of the public who want to offer feedback can email their comments to Boulder County’s Elections Division at vote@bouldercountyvotes.org. The matter is tentatively scheduled to go before the Board of County Commissioners for approval on Thursday, Feb. 16. Please send written comments no later than Monday, Feb. 13.

Boulder County conducted its 2010 primary election, as well as its November 2011 coordinated election, by mail ballot. The November 2012 general election will use polling places as well as mail ballots.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2980Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County Precinct Boundary Changes ApprovedBoulder County -- The Board of County Commissioners this morning voted 2-0 to approve updates to the county’s precinct lines and political district maps.

Boulder County’s Elections Division and Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall developed the new map to reflect redistricting decisions made at the state level in 2011. The updates take into account new boundaries for the county’s U.S. House, Colorado Senate and Colorado House representative districts.

The new precinct map will be used for the 2012 election cycle.

As part of the update, the Elections Division staff also introduced a new numbering system that labels precincts geographically. They’re separated into nine categories by municipality or region to make precinct data easier to sort. For example, all Boulder precincts are numbered in the 800s while Longmont’s are in the 600s.

A copy of this morning’s presentation by Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall, which includes details about the new numbering system, is available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2955Tue, 03 Jan 2012 10:00:00
Caucus affiliation deadlines approachingBoulder County, Colo. – Deadlines are already approaching for voters who want to switch party affiliation before caucuses are held during the 2012 election cycle.

Registered voters who want to participate in the Republican Party caucus, to be held Feb. 7, 2012, must affiliate with the GOP no later than Wednesday, Dec. 7. They can do so by updating their voter information at BoulderCountyVotes.org or calling the Boulder County Elections Division at 303-413-7740.

Registered Republican voters who’ve moved recently must update their voter information by Monday, Jan. 9, to participate in the GOP caucus. First-time voters, such as naturalized citizens or those who turn 18 before Feb. 7, must register no later than Jan. 9 if they want to participate in the Republican caucus.

Registered voters who want to affiliate with the Democratic Party or American Constitution Party, both of which will hold caucuses on March 6, have until Friday, Jan. 6, to affiliate.

First-time voters and members of those parties who’ve moved recently must update their voter information by Monday, Feb. 6, to participate in the Democratic or American Constitution caucuses on March 6.
 
Each political party organizes and conducts its own caucus. For more information about a party’s caucus, contact local party leaders.

For more election information, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- www.BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2923Thu, 01 Dec 2011 10:00:00
Boulder County 2011 Election Results Now OfficialBoulder County – The final, official results from Boulder County’s 2011 coordinated election are available now at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
The final official results include the statement of vote, a document that shows precinct-by-precinct results for every issue on Boulder County ballots this year. The statement of vote will be forwarded to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office to become part of the official statewide election record.
 
Earlier this week, elections staff completed the 2011 election audit, a post-election quality assurance test that ensures the accuracy of the machine tally of votes. Boulder County’s enhanced audit uses randomly selected ballots from all scanning systems and compares a manual tally of votes with the actual election-night machine tally of the same ballots. Any discrepancy is investigated. A final report is issued to the Boulder County Canvass Board for verification prior to election certification.
 
The Boulder County Canvass Board on Tuesday certified the election and signed off on the audit. This year’s Canvass Board consisted of Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall, Longmont City Clerk Valeria Skitt and Boulder City Clerk Alisa Lewis.

More election information is available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2912Fri, 18 Nov 2011 10:00:00
UPDATED: Boulder County 2011 Coordinated Election ResultsBoulder County - The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office added 849 ballots tonight to the unofficial 2011 coordinated election results at BoulderCountyVotes.org. This increases the total number of ballots tallied for the election to 83,573, up from 82,724.
 
Election results remain unofficial until the Boulder County Canvass Board certifies the abstract of votes cast, due Friday, Nov. 18.
 
The updated tally includes ballots from overseas voters as well as voters who needed to add or confirm a signature on their mail-ballot envelope or provide ID for their ballot to be counted. All of the ballots were voted on or before Election Day on Nov. 1.
 
Under state law, voters who needed to cure their ballots had until the close of business today to do so. The Elections Division last week sent these voters instructions on how to make sure their ballots were included in the final tally. Overseas military and other voters living abroad had until 4:30 p.m. today for their ballots to be in the hands of the Elections Division as long as the return envelopes were postmarked no later than Nov. 1.
 
Election results are undergoing an audit this week. The Canvass Board review and final certification are set for next week. 
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=2899Wed, 09 Nov 2011 10:00:00
Recount of Boulder County Question 1D completeBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Elections Division has completed recounting 63,275 ballots for Boulder County Question 1D. The measure, which extends the term limits for the District Attorney to a maximum of three terms, passed by nine votes.

Final recount results for Boulder County Question 1D are 29,966 votes in favor of the measure and 29,957 votes against the measure.

Representatives of the Boulder County canvass board certified the final results of the recount at 2 p.m. on Friday, November 20.

“The purpose of the recount is to ensure that every vote that should have been counted was included in the results,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “We are confident that with the processes we have in place we have accomplished this goal.”

Five votes changed during the recount for a net difference of three votes. These five vote changes can be explained by the following:

  • During the recount process two ‘yes’ votes were determined to be undervotes.
  • Three other votes (two ‘yes’ votes and one ‘no’ vote) were deemed overvotes by the recount resolution teams due to a lack of  clarity of the voter’s intent. 
  • Undervotes and overvotes cannot be counted.

Final results for the contest are available online at www.VoteBoulder.org.

-END-

Contact: Jessie Cornelius 303-413-7766
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1924Fri, 20 Nov 2009 10:00:00
Official results for the 2009 Coordinated Election are available onlineBoulder County, Colo. - The Boulder County canvass board certified the results of the 2009 Coordinated Election on Monday and a mandatory recount of Boulder County Question 1D will commence on Tuesday.

The canvass board, which was comprised of representatives of the entities coordinating in the election, signed paperwork at 11 a.m. Monday certifying the election results. During the canvass, the board verified the number of ballots counted in the election and ensured they did not exceed the number of people who voted. A total of 63,320 ballots were cast in this year’s election. The canvass board also conducted a review of the audit report to ensure the election results were accurate.

Boulder County completed verifying the machine tally of votes on Friday during its enhanced election audit. The audit included examining 20 contests on this year’s ballot that had close margins of victory, including Boulder County Question 1D and the Boulder County Nederland Community Library District Ballot Issue 5B.

“We manually counted 22,139 votes for the audit and compared them to election night results to ensure the accuracy of the election night totals,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “I want to thank my staff and the audit board for their diligent work during this process.”

The election results have determined the need for a mandatory recount of all ballots cast that include Boulder County Ballot Question 1D, where the difference of ‘yes’ and ‘no’ votes was a total of 12. The threshold for a mandatory recount in that contest was 150 votes or less. The margins in all other contests are wide enough that a mandatory recount will not be required.

The recount of Boulder County Question 1D will begin on Tuesday with a pretest of the scanning equipment. During this test, election officials will scan four batches of 150 ballots through each of the four scanners used during the election. The machine tally of votes will be compared with a manual tally of votes. If the tallies match, the recount will proceed by scanning all 63,275 ballots that include Boulder County Question 1D.

If there are any discrepancies in the pretest results that cannot be explained by voter error, the Elections Division will conduct a manual recount of all ballots cast that include Boulder County Question 1D.

Members of the press and public are welcome to observe the recount process. The recount will be conducted at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office in Boulder, 1750 33rd St. Contact Jessie Cornelius for details at 303-413-7766 or e-mail jcornelius@bouldercounty.org.

Official election results can be viewed at www.VoteBoulder.org.
-BoulderCounty.org-

Contact: Jessie Cornelius, 303-413-7766


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1917Mon, 16 Nov 2009 10:00:00
Collector vehicles are now defined as model years 1975 and older(Boulder County, Colo.) - A new state law that becomes effective on September 1, will require vehicles to have a model year of 1975 and older in order to be eligible to register for a “Collector Vehicle” license plate. Collector vehicles were previously defined as those 25 years and older.

Vehicles with a model year of 1976 and newer that already display “Collector Vehicle” license plates will be allowed to maintain their plate status as long as the registration is renewed on time. If the registration expires on models 1976 and newer, the vehicles will be required to pass an emissions test and will be registered with standard license plates. Additionally, if a vehicle with a model year of 1976 and newer is sold to a new owner, it will no longer qualify for the “Collector Vehicle” license plate.

The Boulder County Motor Vehicle Division has sent letters to vehicle owners who could be immediately impacted by the new law. Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed Senate Bill 09-003 into law on June 1, which changed the definition of collector vehicles.

If you have any questions, please contact the Motor Vehicle Division at 303-413-7710 or email motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org

-END-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1796Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:00:00
Colorado's motor vehicle registration fees increase beginning July 1, 2009Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

Effective July 1, 2009, a new State law will begin increasing Colorado's motor vehicle registration fees over a three-year period. The new fees will be based on a vehicle’s weight and are in addition to all other registration fees.

Vehicle registration fees will increase each year by the following amounts:

For any vehicle weighing 2,000 pounds or less, which includes motorcycles and small trailers:
• $22.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $25.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $29.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing between 2,001-5,000 pounds, which includes most cars, SUVs, and light trucks:
• $32.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $36.50: July 2010 – June 2011
• $41.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 5,001-10,000 pounds, which includes most large trucks and large SUVs:
• $39.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $45.25: July 2010 – June 2011
• $51.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 10,001-16,000 pounds, which includes most passenger buses:
• $51.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $58.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $66.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing more than 16,000 pounds, which includes most commercial trucks:
• $55.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $63.00: July 2010 – June 2011
• $71.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

The new law already requires Colorado residents to pay an additional $25 each month they are late to register their vehicle. Late fees may not exceed $100. Permits are also subject to late fees.

The registration fees and late fee increases are mandated by the FASTER bill (Senate Bill 09-108), which Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed into law on Monday, March 2. For complete details on the bill, visit Senate Bill 09-108. All funds generated from the fees will be used to maintain Colorado roads and bridges.

If you have any questions, please contact the Motor Vehicle Division at 303.413.7710 or email motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org.

-END-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1714Thu, 18 Jun 2009 10:00:00
Increased Motor Vehicle fees phase in beginning June 1, 2009Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

A new Colorado State law will increase Motor Vehicle late fees to $25 a month beginning June 1, 2009. Registration fees will also increase beginning July 1, 2009. Funds generated from the fees will be used to maintain Colorado roads and bridges.  

Colorado residents will now be required to pay an additional $25 for each month their vehicle’s registration is late. The late fees may not exceed $100.

“We would like Boulder County residents to be aware of these costs, especially the late fees imposed by the new State law,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “I hope residents will be able to avoid some of these costs by renewing their registrations on time.”

Motor Vehicle registration fees will also increase over a three-year period beginning July 1, as part of the legislation’s road and bridge safety surcharges. All registration fee increases are based on a vehicle’s weight.

Vehicle registration fees will increase each year by the following amounts:

For any vehicle weighing 2,000 pounds or less, which includes motorcycles and small trailers:
• $22.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $25.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $29.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing between 2,001-5,000 pounds, which includes most cars, SUVs, and light trucks:
• $32.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $36.50: July 2010 – June 2011
• $41.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 5,001-10,000 pounds, which includes most large trucks and large SUVs:
• $39.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $45.25: July 2010 – June 2011
• $51.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 10,001-16,000 pounds, which includes most passenger buses:
• $51.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $58.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $66.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing more than 16,000 pounds, which includes most commercial trucks:
• $55.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $63.00: July 2010 – June 2011
• $71.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

The late fees and registration fee increases are mandated by the FASTER bill (Senate Bill 09-108), which Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed into law on Monday, March 2. For complete details on the bill, visit Senate Bill 09-108.

-End-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1677Fri, 15 May 2009 10:00:00
Boulder County Motor Vehicle launches convenient online tool to estimate registration fees.Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

(Boulder County, Colo.) - Boulder County residents can now calculate an estimate of their registration fees for newly purchased cars or light trucks on the Boulder County Motor Vehicle Web site. Boulder County’s new tool is one of the first of its kind in the State of Colorado.

“The calculator is intended to help members of the public budget for their registration fees,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “Fees still need to be confirmed and paid by visiting our office but this will at least give an idea of the costs.”

The public can visit the Motor Vehicle Fee Estimation Calculator at http://www.bouldercounty.org/register/motorvehicle/pages/mvfeecalc.aspx. A registration fee estimate can be obtained by providing the following information:
•        Year of the Vehicle
•        Vehicle Type
•        Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) or Vehicle Taxable Value
•        Fuel Type
•        Vehicle Weight
•        Purchase Date
•        Registration Date
A Title Complete Notice with the necessary information is sent to residents upon purchase of a vehicle. Vehicle information can also be obtained from a licensed auto dealer. Users should read the site’s Term Definition Guidelines carefully before entering calculation data.

“Motor Vehicle registration costs are calculated by several factors," said Hall. “As long as accurate data is provided online, the estimate should be very close to the registration fee.”

Newly purchased vehicles must be registered in person in the County in which you reside in the State of Colorado. Registrations can be completed in Boulder County at any of the Motor Vehicle branch office locations:
•        1750 33rd Street, Boulder
•        529 Coffman Street, Longmont
•        722 Main Street, Louisville

The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is encouraging residents to email their feedback on the calculator to motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org. Registrations can be renewed online by visiting http://www.bouldercounty.org/register/motorvehicle

-END-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=1672Thu, 07 May 2009 10:00:00
County to launch new bus service in 2008FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

December 11, 2007

 

CONTACT: Tim Swope, Boulder County Alternative Transportation Coordinator, 720-564-2658

 

County to launch new bus service in 2008

New routes connect East County to jobs, schools, hospital, US36 transit

 

Residents in east Boulder County will gain a brand new bus route and expanded service on an existing route in 2008, making it easier for them to access work, school, medical care and shopping.

 

The Boulder County Commissioners have approved the use of funds from the County’s Transportation Sales Tax to partner with RTD in providing two new bus services in Louisville, Lafayette and Erie. The first will extend the seven-year-old JUMP service to East County Line Road in Erie. The second will launch a new “LYNX” service connecting downtown Louisville and west Louisville neighborhoods to the US36 Corridor.

 

The JUMP currently travels though Boulder every 10 minutes, with service to the Lafayette park-n-Ride every 20 minutes. The proposed extension would travel through Lafayette along Arapahoe Road and Baseline Road, then head north through the Boulder County sections of Erie to the currently planned terminus at the Erie Town Community Center at the intersection of East County Line Road and Leon Wurl Parkway.

 

“Growth in Erie and Lafayette, along with continued in-commuting from areas east of Boulder County, warrant an extension of this bus service. Both RTD and Boulder County have long sought a more direct transit service to Erie, and folks in Erie have been encouraging us to start the service as soon as possible,” said Boulder County Commissioner Will Toor. “This service will carry out the commitment we made to county voters when they supported the countywide transportation sales tax.”

 

The new LYNX bus will offer transit service from the Louisville Library (in downtown Louisville) south to Monarch High School, Avista Hospital, the Flatirons Crossing park-n-Ride and the Broomfield park-n-Ride.

 

The services are scheduled to start this summer. Both services will be funded through a combination of Federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality grants and revenue from the Boulder County Transportation sales tax, which county residents approved in 2001. During the 2007 election, County voters approved an extension of the sales tax, beginning in 2009.

 

Details of the LYNX and JUMP services and the County’s agreements with RTD have not yet been finalized. “We still have to work out the details with RTD, our local partners, and the Regional funding agencies about how this is going to work,” Transportation Director George Gerstle explained. “Originally we had wanted to launch this service sooner, but we are very excited that this most recent proposal offers residents a better service at a lower long-term cost to both the County and RTD.” 

 

-END-

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=991Tue, 11 Dec 2007 10:00:00
Public invited to provide comments on proposed Sustainability Element, County Comp Plan - Wed., May 16 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 14, 2007

 

Contact: Michelle Krezek, Boulder County Land Use Department (720) 564-2623

 

Public invited to provide comments on proposed Sustainability Element for County Comp Plan

 

The Boulder County Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing for the evening of Wednesday, May 16, to take public testimony on adopting a new Sustainability Element for the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan.

 

The hearing will take place:

 

When:     May 16, 2007, 7:00 p.m.

Where:    3rd Floor Hearing Room, Boulder County Courthouse, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

 

As proposed, the new Sustainability Element will help create a framework of sustainable policies and practices for future land use in unincorporated Boulder County. The element gives broad, inclusive goals to help guide future regulations while also providing specific direction on policies such as an expanded transfer of development rights program, structure size, and green building.

 

The Planning Commission will take public testimony at Wednesday night's hearing and it is anticipated that they will then take action to adopt the Goals and Policies making them a part of the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan. Once the Element is adopted, the County Land Use Department will begin work on programs to implement these goals and policies.

 

For additional information, please contact Michelle Krezek at mkrezek@co.boulder.co.us or 720.564.2623. A copy of the draft goals and policies of the Sustainability Element can be found at: www.co.boulder.co.us/lu.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=812Mon, 14 May 2007 10:00:00
Boulder County Land Use Director sworn in as President of American Institute of Certified Planners

Contact:  Barb Halpin, Boulder County Public Information Officer, 303-441-1622

 

Philadelphia, Pa - Boulder County Land Use Department Director Graham Billingsley officially took office today as president of the American Planning Association’s (APA) professional institute, the American Institute of Certified Planners. The swearing in ceremony was conducted as part of APA’s National Planning Conference in Philadelphia.

 

Graham has served as president-elect for the past year and will now serve as president for a two-year term. As president, he is responsible for heading up the American Institute of Certified Planners Commission and guiding certification, accreditation, professional development and ethics within the planning community. The presidency is a voluntary position.

 

Billingsley has served as director of the Boulder County Land Use Department since 1989 and has played a critical role in facilitating an ongoing public process of updating both the County’s Comprehensive Plan and the County’s Land Use Code. As a result of his efforts, other communities often look to Boulder County as an innovative role model for long term, smart growth planning.

 

Graham's 18-year tenure at Boulder County has included the adoption of a site plan review program for all new construction; the adoption of numerous intergovernmental agreements creating urban growth boundaries for all communities in the county; and a transfer of development rights program that has led to the preservation of more than 6,000 acres.

 

Most recently, Billingsley has helped oversee an extensive review and revision process for the existing land use code, a process that is putting sustainable land use policies and practices in the forefront of future planning and development.

 

Billingsley’s career in the planning profession spans more than 30 years of service in public and private sectors in Colorado, Texas, Missouri and Ohio. He served as president of the APA Colorado chapter for four years (from 2002-06), and has held a number of other offices in professional planning organizations.

 

APA is a 41,000-member organization committed to promoting good planning processes. The professional institute, which constitutes 16,000 of those members, certifies planners and focuses on ethics, professional development and standards of professional practice. For more information about APA, please visit: www.planning.org.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=1&a=789Tue, 17 Apr 2007 10:00:00