Housing Assistance Programs

Are you a Boulder County Housing Authority tenant or Housing Choice Voucher recipient?
Would you like to volunteer time and support the long term planning of Boulder County Housing Authority?


Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) is convening a Resident Advisory Board (RAB) and seeking volunteers to participate. The role of the RAB is to advise BCHA on our Annual Plan and other Housing Authority policies and plans from time to time. Participants on the RAB must be current residents in good standing in one of BCHA’s federally funded housing programs. BCHA is seeking five volunteers with a diverse range of perspectives and program participation to serve on the RAB. Ideally, the RAB will be composed of representatives from Housing Choice Vouchers, FSS, VASH, and Public Housing. The RAB’s duties include attending one-three meetings per year, reviewing materials, and providing feedback to the BCHA staff. To apply, please send a one page letter or email to Amanda Guthrie describing your experience and why you would like to be a member of the RAB. Amanda Guthrie’s contact information is aguthrie@bouldercounty.org or 720-564-2280. Applications are due by January 22nd to February 4th, 2014. Applications will be reviewed by BCHA staff. RAB members will be appointed by Executive Director Frank Alexander. Applications can also be mailed to: Amanda Guthrie, Boulder County Housing Authority, PO Box 471, Boulder CO 80306. The Housing Authority of the County of Boulder, Colorado does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its federally assisted programs or activities.

The first meeting of the RAB will be February 27, 2014 at 2525 13th Street Suite 204, Boulder, CO 80304 at 10am.

 About

About the Housing Assistance Programs

Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) administers programs that address specific needs of a cross-section of County residents. These programs, described below, serve low-income individuals and households, military Veterans, homeless families, and families and children involved in the child welfare system. Each of these programs operates under the standard Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) guidelines, allowing the participant afford decent, safe and sanitary housing in the private housing market. This division also administers housing vouchers through a Project-Based Voucher Program under which the housing assistance is attached to a specific unit, rather than the person.

Participants are able to choose any private or BCHA-owned unit in the County and Broomfield that meets eligibility requirements, including area of service, rent amount, number of bedrooms, and housing quality standards/acceptable level of health and safety. Rent payments are administered by the housing authority paying its portion/subsidy to the landlord directly on behalf of the tenant. The household pays the difference between the rent amount and the subsidy. The family’s portion equates to approx. 30% of their gross household income.

To be eligible for the program, households must earn at or below 80% of the Area Median Income (AMI) for Boulder County (some programs are capped at 30% and 50% AMI). Participants are required to submit income and asset documentation. Additionally, staff will obtain a background report from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation is obtained by staff for all household members over age 18.

Participants agree to pay rent on time, comply with lease agreements, report changes in income and household size, attend required annual recertifications, and adequately maintain their property.


Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program


The HCV Program, also known as “Section 8,” is a rent subsidy program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The program assists individuals and families with very-low income, including Seniors and people with disabilities. Assistance is provided on behalf of the participants, who secure their own housing within the community, with rent payments split in portions between the Housing Authority and the household.


The HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) Program


The VASH program combines HCV rental assistance for homeless Veterans with case management and clinical services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). VA provides these services for participating Veterans at VA medical centers and community-based outreach clinics. All participants are referred to BCHA by the VA.


Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) Program


TBRA is a State-funded 2-year program providing housing vouchers and intensive case management to families who are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless with children in the local school districts. It works closely with McKinney-Vento school liaisons and life skills programs to positively affect the child(ren)’s academic, attendance and behavioral performance, and their parents’ education and employment goals, through housing stabilization.


Family Unification Program (FUP)


FUP is a supportive housing, early intervention program that provides housing with supportive case management services to both families with identified child welfare concerns and youth transitioning out of the foster care system within the County. The objective is to promote family reunification, with the end result being the prevention of the removal of children from their parents due to housing instability. FUP also addresses the needs of homeless youth that have spent considerable time in the foster care system by offering supportive services, enhancing their opportunity for self-sufficiency and transition into adulthood.


Project-Based Voucher (PBV) Program


Under the PBV program, the assistance is tied to the unit, rather than the person. Boulder County owns and manages properties throughout the County and offers these units to eligible residents at a cost that is affordable to them. Participants come from Boulder County’s Self-Sufficiency Program, a 5-year a five-year academic, employment and savings initiative program designed to help the families gain job training and education to improve their family’s financial situation and move toward self-sufficiency.


 Applicants/Waitlist Openings

Housing Assistance Programs - Information for Interested Applicants


Current Waitlist Opening

Project Based Section 8 Assistance Application

The Boulder County Housing Authority (BCHA) hereby gives notice of the opening of the Section 8 Project Based Voucher two (2) bedroom waitlist for available units approved by HUD for the Project Based Voucher Program beginning February 19, 2014 until February 21, 2014. Please note that this is site-based assistance, and the voucher is only applicable to a specific property.

Applications may be picked up at our main administrative building located at 2525 13th Street, Suite 204 in Boulder, Colorado from 8:00 AM though 4:30 PM beginning on February 19, 2014, or completed online. Completed applications must be received by our office no later than February 21, 2014 by 4:30 p.m.


The following waitlists are for Boulder County owned and managed Elderly/Senior sites, and the waitlists remain open year-round:

Prime Haven

Senior/Disabled Housing in Nederland, CO. Application.

Walter Self Apartment

Senior/Disabled Housing in Lyons, CO Application.


Frequently Asked


1: What is the Housing Choice Voucher Program and how does it differ from Section 8?


The Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program and Section 8 are two different names for the same program. This is a federal assistance program to help people with low income pay their rent.


2: What are the benefits of the Housing Choice Voucher Program for the participant?


  • The program promotes housing choice; a household awarded a voucher can look for a unit within the neighborhood of their choice, within the housing authority’s area
  • The program promotes quality housing; units are inspected annually to ensure standards of health and safety are met
  • The household contribution is approximately 30-40% of their monthly-adjusted income, with the balance paid by the housing authority (directly to the property owner)

3: Who is eligible for a voucher?


Households qualify for the program if their income is 80% or less of the area median income (AMI) for Boulder County or Broomfield (some programs are capped at 30% and 50% AMI). Eligible households include individuals or families with low income, including people on a fixed income, such as those who are elderly and/or have a disability.


4: Can I apply for a voucher, if so, when, and how?


Unfortunately, applications are not accepted unless and until the waitlist opens. Due to the high need and low turnover of vouchers, the waitlist opens rarely (often only 3-5 years, if that). If/when the waitlist re-opens, it will be advertised in the local newspaper(s) and the County website.


5: What information is requested on the application?


On the application, you will need to provide household information including income, assets, child care and medical expenses, as applicable.


6: I have already submitted an application for a voucher. When will I hear if I’m accepted?


If you have submitted an application for a voucher, you have been placed on the wait list. Applicants are prioritized based on certain criteria such as being elderly, having a disability, being a family with children, and being a County resident. If a voucher is available for you, you will be contacted by the Wait List Administrator to learn about your next steps. Please remember to contact BCHA in writing if your address changes; if not, you may lose your opportunity for a voucher.


7: If called up for a voucher, what documentation will I need to provide to BCHA for final approval?


You will need to provide copies of Social Security cards, birth certificates, and income and asset documentation for all household members. You will also be required to sign other forms as required by BCHA. Additionally, staff obtains background reports from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation for all household members over age 18, which also may affect final approval.


8: What if my household size and income has changed since I first applied?


If you are approved for a voucher, the Wait List Administrator will ask you to update your application with your current household members, and provide the required documentation at your briefing appointment.


9: If I am approved, where can I use my voucher?


Vouchers may be used in Boulder County and Broomfield. Boulder County jurisdictions include Boulder, Erie (within Boulder County limits), Jamestown, Lafayette, Longmont, Louisville, Lyons, Nederland, Superior and Ward, and those in Unincorporated County include Allenspark, Caribou, Coal Creek (within Boulder County limits), Eldorado Springs, Gold Hill, Gunbarrel, Hygiene and Niwot. Note: while BCHA places residents with vouchers within Boulder (city) and Longmont through intergovernmental agreements allowing them to do so, residents of Boulder (city) and Longmont must contact their designated housing authority to seek a voucher.


10: What kind of rental unit qualifies for the program?


All existing rental housing may be eligible; single-family homes, condominiums, apartments, mobile homes, townhouses and duplexes. Each unit must be located within Boulder County or Broomfield, rent for below the program’s payment standards, and pass a Housing Quality Standards (HQS) Inspection, among other requirements.


11: What if I receive a voucher and have special needs due to my disability?


If you have special needs to adapt to your unit or living situation, you may request a Reasonable Accommodation. Such requests may include the addition of a live-in aide, physical modifications to the unit (at your expense), the addition of a service animal, and the allowance of additional time to complete a request required of all tenants. Please note that requests are considered on a case-by-case basis, and if approved, it must also be approved by the landlord.


12: If/when I receive a voucher, how long will I have to find a unit?


After you fully approved for the assistance, you will have 60 days to find a place to live. If you do not find one within that time period, you will risk losing your voucher. Time extensions are granted for special circumstances.


13: What will be my rights and responsibilities as a tenant?


At their annual recertification, voucher-holders are given a list of Family Responsibilities to sign yearly, acknowledging an understanding of their responsibilities. Tenants have the right to:
  • Request a reasonable accommodation to accommodate special needs. Reasonable Accommodation requests are approved on a case-by-case basis. Tenants should contact their case manager for the appropriate paperwork.
  • File a complaint with HUD if you believe your Fair Housing rights have been violated on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, age, national origin and/or sexual orientation.
  • Privacy within the unit. A landlord must provide appropriate notice to their tenant if they wish to enter the unit during a reasonable time of day. In emergency cases, a landlord may enter the unit without notice to make necessary repairs.
  • Choose not to renew the lease at the end of the term or, in the case of a mutual agreement to rescind the lease, to move out of the unit during the lease term, provided a proper notice was given as outlined in the lease agreement.
  • Request a hearing for various staff decisions including termination of assistance or denial of a housing request.

Tenants have the following responsibilities. They must:

  • Allow your case manager and/or the inspector to inspect the unit at reasonable times and after reasonable notice.
  • Notify your case manager and landlord in writing before moving out of the unit or terminating the lease providing at least a 30-day notice.
  • Request approval from BCHA and your landlord to add a household member as an occupant to the unit.
  • Not commit fraud, bribery, drug-related, violent or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with the program.
  • Not commit any serious or repeated lease violations.

14: How is income verified?


All income, benefits, and allowances must be documented from independent third-party sources. Households are required to report all income; unreported income may result in repayment of housing assistance, or termination of assistance.


15: How can a household find a landlord that accepts tenants with a voucher?


Some landlords seeking to rent to program participants note that in their rental advertisement. BCHA also maintains a landlord list noting landlords who accept rental assistance.


16: How much can a landlord charge for rent?


The rent amount for a tenant receiving housing assistance must be below the payment standard for that type of unit. This amount is based on local fair market rents, which are the average gross rents (rent plus utilities) being paid in the specific community for modest housing units of varying sizes.


17: How are utilities paid?


The landlord chooses which utilities, if any, they will provide as a part of the rent and which utilities are to be paid by the tenant. If a tenant pays a utility, BCHA will credit the household with a utility allowance, based on the average cost of utilities, size of the unit, and the location of the unit. The allowance is not based on the household’s actual energy consumption. The allowance will lower the tenant’s rent portion and leave them with funds to assist with the utility cost. If the tenant's portion is less than the utility allowance for the unit, the household will receive the difference in a utility check.


18: Who is responsible for paying the security deposit, and how much can a landlord collect?


The security deposit is paid by the tenant prior to taking possession of the unit. The amount must be fair and reasonable, usually one month’s rent amount, and in compliance with state and local laws. It must also be comparable to the deposits charged by the landlord to their other tenants.


19: What are (some of) landlords’ rights and responsibilities?


Landlords have the right to:
  • Terminate tenancy under conditions outlined in the Housing Authority Payment (HAP) Contract for such reasons as serious and repeated violations of the lease, criminal activity, destruction of property, and failure to pay the tenant portion of rent.
  • Refuse tenancy to an program participant as long as it is not a violation of Fair Housing laws
  • Collect an appropriate security deposit, used in accordance with local and state laws.
  • Raise rent at the end of the lease term provided the required notice is given to the case manager in the required timeframe, and the increased rent amount is considered “reasonable” based on program guidelines.
  • Choose not to renew a lease at the end of the lease term.

Landlords have the following responsibilities. They must:

  • Use their own lease.. BCHA may require and provide lease addendums. BCHA must receive a copy of the lease.
  • Sign and return, as requested, all required documentation to BCHA in a timely manner.
  • Sign, submit and provide updates for documentation and information as required, such as tax payer identification information, such as a W-9 form, change of address, change of name, and/or change of the building owner.
  • Contact the tenant’s case manager within 60 days of any anticipated rent increase to the tenant.
  • Provide copies of any eviction notices, if applicable, to the case manager at the time the notice is sent to the tenant.
  • Perform all necessary maintenance to ensure the unit meets HUD’s Housing Quality Standards.
  • Allow the unit to be inspected annually or in special circumstances, as needed, and correct all report failures within the specified time period. Failure to make repairs may result in either a halt of BCHA’s portion of the rent or termination of the Housing Authority Payment (HAP) Contract.
  • Comply with Fair Housing laws.

20: I receive a voucher and then decide to move out of County/State can I take it with me?


After a year with BCHA, a participant may take their voucher with them if they choose move to another county or state. To do this, they will need to contact their case manager. The case manager will transfer their paperwork to BCHA’s Portability Specialist to complete the process, which includes providing documentation to the new housing authority.


21: What does the housing inspector look for during an annual inspection?


Each unit is inspected annually (or more, as needed) to ensure it meets HUD’s Minimum Housing Quality Standards. The tenant, or an alternate person over age 18, must be present for inspections. Inspected items include building structure and exterior; plumbing, heating and electrical systems; windows, exits and hallways; and all rooms to make sure the unit is safe, clean, and in good condition. The inspector must have access to the unit, the basement, and all common areas. If repairs are required, the landlord must correct deficiencies, within a certain time period, and pass a re-inspection. If repairs are not made within the timeframe, the housing assistance payments will be halted, and in certain situations impacting health and safety, the tenant will not be able to occupy the unit.


22: What is the Carbon Monoxide Detector Law and does it apply to a tenant?


Effective July 1, 2009, Colorado House Bill 1091 requires homeowners and owners of rental property (single-family homes, multi-family homes) to install carbon monoxide alarms near the bedrooms (or other room lawfully used for sleeping purposes) in every home that is heated with natural gas or propane, has a gas appliance, has a fireplace, or has an attached garage. This requirement applies to every home that is sold, remodeled, repaired, or leased to a new tenant after July 1, 2009, including landlords participating in the program. For more information, please read House Bill 1091.


23: What is the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and how does it affect a participant’s assistance?


The Violence against Women Act (VAWA) is a federal law, effective 2006, to protect individuals who are victims of domestic violence by prohibiting apartment firms from evicting the resident because of criminal activity committed by a member of the victim’s household.


24: What types of actions may lead to termination from the program?


The following are some actions that may lead to program termination: fraud (i.e., providing false information or documentation), non-compliance with program requirements, criminal or drug activity, unauthorized household members, non-compliance with a lease. If a program participant is terminated, they will receive a termination letter which informs them of their opportunity to present their case to the Housing Board for reinstatement. BCHA and HUD are stringent regarding program compliance and will take action as necessary.


25: How can I find out more information about participating in the program?


To learn more information about tenant participation, please refer to Frequently Asked Questions for Tenants.


26: How can I find out more information about landlord participation?


To learn more information about landlord participation, please refer to Frequently Asked Questions for Landlords.


27: What if I have questions that have not been answered?


If you have questions that have not been answered, please call BCHA at 303/441-3929.


 For Participants

Section 8 Participant Frequently Asked Questions


1: What is Section 8 and how does it differ from the Housing Choice Voucher program?


The Section 8 program and Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program are two different names for the same program. This is a federal assistance program, funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), to help people with low income pay their rent. Residents with these vouchers find their own housing and pay a percentage of their income for rent, while the program pays the landlord the difference.


2: What are the benefits of the Section 8 Program?


  • The program promotes housing choice; a household awarded a voucher can look for a unit within the neighborhood of their choice within the housing authority’s area
  • The program promotes quality housing; rental units are inspected annually to ensure that standards of health and safety are met
  • The household contribution is approximately 30-40% of their monthly-adjusted income
  • The program makes quality housing affordable; a rental subsidy is paid by Boulder County directly to the landlord
  • Participants pay the difference between the actual rent charged by the landlord and the amount subsidized by the program

3: Who is eligible for a voucher?


Households qualify for the program if their incomes are 50% or less of the area median income for the Boulder County area (or Broomfield, if applicable). An eligible household can be a single person that is elderly or disabled, as well as households with two or more members.


4: Where can a tenant use their voucher?


The Housing Authority assists residents living in Boulder County and within the City and County of Broomfield. Boulder County jurisdictions include Boulder, Erie (within Boulder County limits), Jamestown, Lafayette, Longmont, Louisville, Lyons, Nederland, Superior and Ward, and those in Unincorporated Boulder County include Allenspark, Caribou, Coal Creek (within Boulder County limits), Eldorado Springs, Gold Hill, Gunbarrel, Hygiene and Niwot.

Please note that while Boulder County places their residents with Section 8 vouchers within Boulder (city) and Longmont through intergovernmental agreements allowing them to do so, residents of Boulder (city) and Longmont must contact their designated housing authority to seek a voucher.


5: What kind of rental unit qualifies for the program?


All existing rental housing may be eligible; single-family homes, condominiums, apartments, mobile homes, townhouses and duplexes. All rental units must pass a Housing Quality Standards (HQS) Inspection and meet local code requirements.


6: What if a tenant requires certain physical accommodations, such as those for a disability, to be able to live in their home?


A tenant may request a reasonable accommodation to assist in adapting with a disability so that they have an equal opportunity to use and enjoy their home. Such requests may include the addition of a live-in aide, physical modifications to the unit (at his/her own expense), the addition of a service animal, a parking space close to their unit, and the allowance of additional time to complete a request required of all tenants. The landlord must consider the request, but is not required to approve the request. In the event that the landlord does not accommodate the request, the tenant will need to move to place that will.


7: What are tenants’ rights and responsibilities?


At their annual recertification, households are given a Family Responsibilities form yearly to sign, acknowledging an understanding of all their responsibilities. Tenants have the right to:
  • Request a reasonable accommodation, to assist in adapting with a disability, so that they have an equal opportunity to use and enjoy their home. Such requests may include the addition of a live-in aide, physical modifications to the unit (at his/her own expense), the addition of a service animal, a parking space close to their unit, and the allowance of additional time to complete a request required of all tenants. The landlord must consider the request, but is not required to approve the request.
  • File a complaint with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) if the tenant believes the landlord was discriminatory on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, age, national origin and/or sexual orientation.
  • Privacy within the rental unit. The landlord must provide appropriate notice to the tenant if they wish to enter the unit during a reasonable time of day. However, in the case of an emergency, the landlord can enter the unit without notice to make necessary repairs.
  • Choose not to renew the lease at the end of the lease term or, in the case of a mutual agreement to rescind the lease, to move out of the unit during the lease term, provided a proper notice was given as outlined in the lease agreement
  • Request an appeal hearing for various staff decisions including termination of assistance or denial of a housing request (not considered a reasonable accommodation).

Tenants have the following responsibilities. They must:

  • Report all changes in income and household composition
  • Allow their case manager and/or the inspector to inspect the unit at reasonable times and after reasonable notice
  • Notify their case manager and their landlord in writing before moving out of the unit or terminating the lease providing a 30-day notice.
  • Request approval from Boulder County and their landlord to add a household member as an occupant to the unit
  • Not commit fraud, bribery or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with the voucher program
  • Not engage in drug-related criminal activity or violent criminal activity
  • Not commit any serious or repeated lease violations

8: How is income verified, and how is it used to determine the tenant’s rent portion?


All income, benefits, and allowances must be documented. Boulder County staff must obtain written verification from independent third-party sources and document tenant files. In addition, staff receives employment information from an Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) report from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). During the annual recertification, the case manager reviews the EIV report with the household and compares it with the verification documentation. Households are required to report all income; unreported income can result in repayment of housing assistance, or termination of assistance.


9: When are changes reported?


Any change in income or household composition must be reported to the Boulder County within 10 days of its occurrence. Households must contact their case manager or download the Verification of Earnings form, sign it, and submit it to their case manager with their employer’s name and fax number. Failure to report or under-reporting any changes could result in the household repaying any monies owed, or risk program termination.


10: What are annual recertification appointments, and why are they necessary?


Boulder County is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to review each household’s income, assets and household size, and to obtain signatures for required documentation at least one time per year. The purpose of the annual recertification appointment is to ensure that the correct amount of rent is being paid based on actual income and the home is the correct size for the household.


11: How is the recertification appointment scheduled, and what happens during that meeting?


Approximately three months prior the household’s annual recertification date, households are mailed a letter from Boulder County, listing the appointment date, time and location, and including a few authorization forms. The household is expected to attend the meeting, and on time, with all household members over age 18. To this appointment, they should bring the authorization forms and copies of all current income documentation and asset documentation (i.e., bank statements) from all household members. At this appointment, the household will be asked to review, complete and sign program documents and submit copies of income and asset documentation. This is also a good opportunity for the household to ask their case manager any questions they may have. At the end of the meeting, they will be provided with information regarding when they should plan to receive documentation regarding their new rent amount and any other follow-up information.


12: What if a household cannot make their scheduled recertification appointment?


Boulder County staff highly encourages the household to make this recertification appointment a priority in their schedule, even if it means rescheduling other priorities. This meeting, usually only held one time per year, is required for the household to continue receiving housing assistance. However, Boulder County staff understands that unavoidable issues such as illness, emergencies, or being out of town will require that the appointment be rescheduled. If and when a situation like this occurs, the household should contact their case manager as early as possible prior to the meeting to let them know that they are unable to make it. The case manager will contact the household at a later date to reschedule.


13: What if a household does not have transportation to meet their case manager at their office?


If a household is not able to make it to their appointment, they should contact their case manager to request that the meeting be conducted at their home. They may need to make this request every year, if needed.


14: How can a household find a landlord that accepts tenants with a Section 8 voucher?


Some landlords will note in their rental advertisement that they accept residents with a voucher. Additionally, Boulder County keeps a landlord list of some landlords throughout Boulder County and Broomfield (mainly of apartment buildings) that accept Section 8 rental assistance.


15: Are landlords required to rent to Section 8 participants?


No, a landlord may choose if/when to rent to tenants receiving housing assistance.


16: Can Boulder County provide information about a Section 8 participant’s rental history?


Staff reserves the right to release tenancy histories to an owner, as requested, with respect to such factors as payment of rent and utility bills; caring for a unit and premises; respecting the rights of others to the peaceful enjoyment of their housing; drug-related criminal activity or other criminal activity including drug trafficking; compliance with conditions of tenancy; and names, addresses and phone numbers of current and prior landlords.


17: Can a program participant rent a unit from a relative?


The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) regulations prohibit Boulder County from allowing a program participant to rent a unit from a relative. The only exception is for Boulder County to determine that such a situation would provide a reasonable accommodation for a household member who is a person with disabilities. These decisions are addressed on a case-by-case basis.


18: Can a household pay extra rent to make up the amount the landlord wants for the unit?


No, the household may only pay the full amount for rent and the utilities they are responsible for, as outlined in their lease. The owner may not, under any circumstance, charge or accept additional payments from any member of the household, other than that which has been approved by Boulder County.


19: Does Boulder County provide a specific lease for their program participants?


Boulder County does not provide leases for their participants; each landlord must provide their own lease between them and their landlord. (Lease templates can be found online and downloaded.) Boulder County may provide various supplements to leases for program participants, such as a Drug-Free Lease Addendum, required by the program and/or the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The program requires that the initial lease be for a one-year term, with the option to rent for a month-to-month basis after that. The lease should include information such as names of the landlord and tenant, address of the rental unit, term of the lease and how it will be renewed, monthly rent amount, which utilities are paid by the tenant and which are paid by the landlord, and which appliances are provided by each party. A landlord may include any other conditions that they normally include in their leases, as long as laws are not violated.


20: How much can a landlord charge for rent?


The rent amount must be reasonable compared to other units of similar size in the community. Staff will compare the rent to the Boulder County and Broomfield Payment Standard, which are based in part on the local fair market rents. The fair market rents are the average gross rents (rent plus utilities) being paid in the specific community for modest housing units of varying sizes.

If the gross rent (rent plus utilities) for the unit is less than or equal to the payment standard, the tenants pay 30% of their monthly income for rent and Boulder County pays the rest. If the rent is higher than the payment standard, the tenant(s) must make up the difference. However, they are not allowed to pay more than 40% of their income for rent when they first rent a unit.


21: Can a landlord request a rent increase?


Yes, a landlord can request a rent increase. Each year, approx. three months prior to the lease end date, a landlord is given an opportunity, through a landlord questionnaire mailed to them, to let the program know whether they want to sign a new lease with their tenant(s), and if so, whether the rent amount will change and by how much.

If the landlord requests a rent increase after the initial term of the lease and within the current lease period, the landlord must provide at least 60 days written notice of an upcoming increase to their tenant’s case manager, as outlined in the Housing Authority Payment Contract (HAP). The proposed increase should not exceed the program’s payment standards for the type of unit and location, and may not exceed the rent for unassisted rental units of the same size and type owned by them. Boulder County reserves the right to deny any rent increase found to be unreasonable based on market conditions at the time or to delay the start of increases when proper notice has not been given.


22: How does the landlord get paid their rent?


The tenant is responsible for paying their rent each month and on time. If the tenant’s portion of the rent is late or unpaid, then the landlord has the right to enforce the lease. The program will directly deposit Boulder County’s portion of the rent on the 1st business day of each month. (If there is a delay in Boulder County’s payment, the landlord may not penalize the tenant.)


23: How are utilities paid?


The landlord decides which utilities, if any, they will provide as a part of the rent and which utilities the tenant(s) will be responsible for. If a tenant is responsible for paying a utility, Boulder County generally will credit the household with a utility allowance, which is based on the average cost of utilities, size of the unit, and the location of the unit; not on the household’s actual energy consumption. The utility allowance will lower the tenant’s rental share and leave them with the necessary money to assist with utility cost. If the tenant's portion is less than the utility allowance for the unit, the household will receive the difference in a utility check.


24:Who is responsible for paying the security deposit, and how much can a landlord collect?


The security deposit is to be paid by the tenant, prior to taking possession of the unit. The amount must be fair and reasonable, usually one month’s rent amount, and in compliance with state and local laws. The amount also must be comparable to the security deposit charged by the landlord to their other tenants.


25: What if a tenant has a problem with their landlord?


If a tenant has a disagreement or conflict with their landlord, they are encouraged to first speak directly to their landlord about it with the intention of resolving the issue. If they find that they need their case manager to get involved, they should contact her/him to see if they can get some guidance in working out the issues. It is important to note that the case manager may not always get involved on the tenant’s behalf, but will guide the tenant as to how to resolve the situation. Additionally, local resources are available to help provide information and mediation for tenant-landlord issues, such as the Boulder County District Attorney’s Office at 303-441-3700.


26:Can a landlord contact Boulder County about a lease situation between them and their tenant(s)?


Landlords participating in the program should interact with their tenant(s) as they would with their tenant(s) who are not receiving a housing assistance. The only difference is that the tenant’s case manager should be notified in certain circumstances such as unpaid rent, additional household members not listed on the lease, the use, sale or manufacturing of illegal drugs, or situations involving violence and/or domestic abuse. The landlord should work directly with the tenant on other lease issues such as property maintenance, noise issues, pet concerns, parking issues, and property entrance agreements. If a landlord is uncertain about which issues should be brought to the attention of Boulder County, please contact the tenant’s case manager.


27: Can a tenant who is a program participant be evicted?


Yes, a tenant who is a program participant may be evicted for any lease violations. Often, and dependent on the lease terms, the landlord will send warning letters to the tenant prior to eviction, making them aware of the violation. If and when a warning letter is received by the tenant, they should notify their case manager so she/he can work with them to try to remedy the situation in an effort to avoid an eviction. A landlord may not, however, evict a Section 8 tenant for non-payment of the housing assistance payment by Boulder County.


28: What are (some of) landlords’ rights and responsibilities?


Landlords have the right to:
  • Terminate tenancy under conditions outlined in the Housing Authority Payment (HAP) Contract for such reasons as serious and repeated violations of the lease, criminal activity, destruction of property, and failure to pay the tenant portion of rent
  • Refuse tenancy to an applicant as long as it is not a violation of Fair Housing laws
  • Collect an appropriate security deposit, used in accordance with local and state laws
  • Raise rent at the end of the lease term provided the required notice is given to the case manager in the required timeframe, and the increased rent amount is considered “reasonable” based on program guidelines
  • Choose not to renew a lease at the end of the lease term

Landlords have the following responsibilities. They must:

  • Use their own lease, as they would when renting to an unassisted household. Boulder County may require an addendum, which it will provide. The landlord must submit a copy of the lease to the tenant’s case manager.
  • Sign and return, as requested, all required documentation in a timely manner
  • Sign, submit and provide updates for documentation/information as required, such as a W-9 form, change of address, change of name, and/or change of building owner
  • Contact the tenant’s case manager to inform them of any situation that may affect their tenant’s housing assistance such as non-payment of rent, unauthorized household members, etc.
  • Provide copies of all eviction notices to the tenant’s case manager at the time the notice is sent to the tenant
  • Perform all necessary maintenance to ensure the unit meets the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Housing Quality Standards
  • Allow the unit to be inspected at least annually and must correct all report failures within the specified time period. Failure to make repairs may result in either a halt of Boulder County’s portion of the rent or termination of the Housing Authority Payment (HAP) Contract.
  • Comply with Fair Housing laws

29: Can a household take their voucher with them if they want to move to another county/state?


Yes, after a year of participation in Boulder County’s program, they may take their voucher with them if they choose move to another county or state. To do this, they will need to talk to their case manager, who will then connect them with Boulder County’s Portability specialist to complete the required paperwork. Wherever they choose to live, their new housing will need to comply with the same requirements as with Boulder County’s program, such as passing a housing inspection, and ensuring that the rent is fair and below the maximum payment standard for the new county/state agency.


30: What if a household wants to move within Boulder County (or Broomfield), and wants to use their rental assistance for another unit?


After the tenant verifies through their lease and/or their landlord that they may end their existing lease, the tenant should complete a Notice to Vacate form with all required signatures, stating their intention to move, and provide a copy to their case manager. Their case manager will inform the tenant of the guidelines, including maximum allowable rent amount, and to obtain the necessary paperwork for the prospective landlord in order to receive approval for the new housing unit. A program participant has 60 days from the end date of the previous lease to find a place to live. If they are not in a lease by the end of that period, they risk losing their voucher.


31: When is the housing inspection scheduled?


Approximately three months before the household’s annual recertification date, households are mailed a letter from Boulder County, listing their inspection appointment date and time. A household member over age 18 is expected to be present at the inspection.

Boulder County staff highly encourages the household to make this inspection appointment a priority in their schedule, even if it means rescheduling other priorities. This meeting, usually only held one time per year, is required for the household to continue receiving housing assistance.

Staff understands, however, that unavoidable issues such as illness, emergencies, or being out of town will require that the inspection appointment be rescheduled. If and when situations like these occur, the household should contact their case manager as early as possible prior to the inspection to let them know that they are unable to make it. The case manager will contact the household at a later date to reschedule the appointment.


32: What does the housing inspector look for during an annual inspection?


Each rental unit in the program is inspected to make sure that it meets the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Housing Quality Standards. The inspector uses an Inspection Checklist provided by HUD. Some items include the exterior of the building, plumbing, heating and electrical systems, windows, exits and hallways, and each room in the property to make sure the unit is safe, clean, and in good condition. The unit must be vacant at the time of the first inspection, and all utilities must be turned on. The inspector must have access to the unit, the basement, and all common areas.

The housing unit is inspected each year. For each item on the list, the inspector marks if the unit passes or fails (or not sure). If repairs are needed, the tenant will not be allowed to rent the unit unless/until the required repairs have been made and the unit passes inspection. In this situation, the landlord must make repairs within the time allotted or else Boulder County will stop their rent payments.


33: What is the Carbon Monoxide Detector Law and does it apply to a tenant?


Effective July 1, 2009, Colorado House Bill 1091 requires homeowners and owners of rental property (single-family homes, multi-family homes) to install carbon monoxide alarms near the bedrooms (or other room lawfully used for sleeping purposes) in every home that is heated with natural gas or propane, has a gas appliance, has a fireplace, or has an attached garage. This requirement applies to every home that is sold, remodeled, repaired, or leased to a new tenant after July 1, 2009, including landlords participating in the program. For more information, please read House Bill 1091.


34: What is The Violence against Women Act (VAWA) and how does it affect a participant’s assistance?


The Violence against Women Act (VAWA) is a federal law, effective 2006, to protect individuals who are victims of domestic violence by prohibiting apartment firms from evicting the resident because of criminal activity committed by a member of the victim’s household. In order to claim protection under VAWA, a resident is required to complete a HUD-approved form certifying that they are a victim of domestic violence.


35: How can I find out more information about landlord participation?


To learn more information about landlord participation, please refer to Frequently-Asked Questions for Landlords.


36: How can I find out more information about the Section 8 waitlist to obtain a voucher?


To learn more information about the Section 8 waitlist to obtain a voucher, please refer to Frequently-Asked Questions for Interested Participants.


37: What if I have questions that have not been answered?


If you have questions that have not been answered, please contact your case manager at 303/441-3929.


 For Landlords

Information For Participating Landlords

BCHA’s Housing Assistance Programs partners with more than 250 landlords throughout the County. Landlords are important members of our program, as they provide housing opportunities for our participants and devote time to meeting our program requirements. Over the past few years, we have streamlined many of our documents and processes with our landlords to more efficiently manage our relationships, with the goal of reducing work time for all parties.

Frequently Asked Questions For Landlords


1: What is the Housing Choice Voucher Program and how does it differ from Section 8?


The Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program and Section 8 are two different names for the same program. This is a federal assistance program to help people with low income pay their rent.


2: What cities/towns are served by BCHA?


Vouchers may be used in Boulder County and Broomfield. Boulder County jurisdictions include Boulder, Erie (within Boulder County limits), Jamestown, Lafayette, Longmont, Louisville, Lyons, Nederland, Superior and Ward, and those in Unincorporated County include Allenspark, Caribou, Coal Creek (within Boulder County limits), Eldorado Springs, Gold Hill, Gunbarrel, Hygiene and Niwot.


3: What are some of the benefits of being a landlord in the program?


  • Tenants may be more diligent in paying their rent, maintaining their property, and other program requirements so as not risk losing their housing assistance
  • The landlord maintains the right (and responsibility) to screen and choose their tenants
  • The portion of rent paid by BCHA is paid to the landlord monthly and on time
  • Participation can increase the pool of potential tenants through marketing by the housing authority
  • The required periodic property inspections can help insure that the property is well-maintained
  • Many landlords derive personal satisfaction by renting to program participants because they are providing housing for struggling individuals/households


4: What are the steps involved in becoming a landlord for a program participant?


The following are the steps involved in renting to (a) tenant(s) with a voucher:
  • A prospective tenant(s) with a voucher views the available rental housing unit and wants to rent it.
  • The landlord screens the prospective tenant(s) to make sure they are a suitable prospect.
  • If the landlord agrees to lease to the prospective tenant(s), they complete the Request for Tenancy Approval (RFTA) form and submit it to their prospective tenant’s BCHA’s case manager. The RFTA requests information regarding the housing unit including, but not limited to, location, rent amount for the property (and for other comparable properties the landlord may own), the type of utilities for the property and the designation of which utilities the tenant(s) is responsible for, and the number of bedrooms.
  • The prospective tenant’s case manager reviews the RFTA to make sure the individual/family can afford the rent and the rent does not exceed the program’s payment standard, and that the lease is acceptable.
  • The case manager informs the landlord as to whether the property is approved, and answers questions.
  • If approved, the case manager sends a housing inspector to the vacant property to make sure the unit meets health and safety standards set by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). If approved, the landlord reviews and signs a Housing Authority Payment (HAP) Contract and other pertinent forms.
  • The landlord designs a lease, obtains the appropriate signatures, and sends a copy to BCHA.
  • The tenant(s) moves into the housing unit.
  • The tenant(s) pays their portion of the rent and the program pays the balance, usually through direct bank deposits


5: What is listed in the Housing Authority Payment (HAP) Contract?


This contract is between the landlord and BCHA. It must be signed by both parties before any payments are made, and it includes information regarding rent, utilities, housing authority payments, and maintenance.


6: What are (some of) my rights and responsibilities as a landlord?


Landlords have the right to:

  • Terminate tenancy under conditions outlined in the contract for such reasons as serious and repeated violations of the lease, criminal activity, destruction of property, and failure to pay the tenant portion of rent
  • Refuse tenancy to an program participant as long as it does not violate Fair Housing laws
  • Collect an appropriate security deposit, used in accordance with local and state laws
  • Raise rent at the end of the lease term provided the case manager is given notice within the required timeframe, and that the increased amount does not exceed payment standards
  • Choose not to renew a lease with an existing tenant at the end of the lease term

Landlords have the following responsibilities. They must:

  • Use their own lease. BCHA may require and provide lease addendums. The landlord must provide a copy of the lease to the tenant’s case manager.
  • Sign and return all required documentation in a timely manner.
  • Sign, submit and provide updates for documentation and information as required, such as taxpayer identification information, change of address, change of name, and/or change of the building owner.
  • Contact the tenant’s case manager to alert them of any lease violations within the required timeframe.
  • Provide copies of any eviction notices, if applicable, to the case manager at the time the notice is sent to the tenant.
  • Perform all necessary maintenance to ensure the unit meets HUD’s Housing Quality Standards.
  • Allow the unit to be inspected at least annually and must correct all report failures within the specified time period. Failure to make repairs may result in either a halt of BCHA’s portion of the rent or termination of the HAP Contract.
  • Comply with Fair Housing laws.


7: What if my tenant has special needs due to a disability?


If your tenant has special needs to adapt to your unit or their living situation, they may request a Reasonable Accommodation (RA). Such requests may include the addition of a live-in aide, physical modifications to the unit (at the tenant’s expense), the addition of a service animal, and the allowance of additional time to complete a request required of all tenants. Please note that RA requests are approved by the BCHA committee on a case-by-case basis, and if approved, the request must also be approved by the property owner. You are not required to approve the accommodation.


8: What forms do I need to submit to ensure that I am paid?


Landlords need to complete a W-9 tax form and a direct deposit form with bank account information (if you want your payments to be deposited into your account monthly).


9: On a W-9 form how is the legal name and DBA (“Doing Business As”) name different?


Landlords need to complete a W-9 tax form and a direct deposit form with bank account information (if you want your payments to be deposited into your account monthly).


10: If I am unsure of my correct Tax ID number, whom should I contact?


Please contact the IRS at 1-800-829-4933 and ask for a 147C letter.


11: Can I fax the completed W-9 form to BCHA?


Yes, this form can be faxed to BCHA at 720/564-2283. Please send the fax to the attention of the Accounts Payable office in the Finance Division.


12: How do I submit a change to name, address or property ownership?


Complete a new W-9 form and fax it to BCHA, to the attention of the Accounts Payable office in the Finance Division.


13: What are (some of) the tenants’ rights and responsibilities?


At their annual recertification, voucher-holders are given a list of Family Responsibilities to sign yearly, acknowledging an understanding of their responsibilities. Tenants have the right to:
  • Request a Reasonable Accommodation to accommodate special needs. RA requests are considered on a case-by-case basis. Tenants should contact their case manager for the appropriate paperwork.
  • File a complaint with HUD if you believe your Fair Housing rights have been violated on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, age, national origin and/or sexual orientation.
  • Privacy within the unit. A landlord must provide appropriate notice to their tenant if they wish to enter the unit during a reasonable time of day. In emergency cases, a landlord may enter the unit without notice to make necessary repairs.
  • Choose not to renew the lease at the end of the term or, in the case of a mutual agreement to rescind the lease, to move out of the unit during the lease term, provided a proper notice was given as outlined in the lease agreement
  • Request an appeal hearing for various staff decisions including termination of assistance or denial of a housing request

Tenants have the following responsibilities. They must:

  • Allow their case manager and/or the inspector to inspect the unit at reasonable times and after reasonable notice
  • Notify their case manager and landlord in writing before moving out of the unit or terminating the lease providing at least a 30-day notice
  • Request approval from BCHA and their landlord to add a household member as an occupant to the unit
  • Not commit fraud, bribery, drug-related, violent or any other corrupt or criminal act in connection with the program
  • Not commit any serious or repeated lease violations


14: What kind of rental unit qualifies for the program?


All existing rental housing may be eligible; single-family homes, condominiums, apartments, mobile homes, townhouses and duplexes. Each unit must be located within Boulder County or Broomfield, rent for below the program’s payment standards, and pass a Housing Inspection, among other requirements.


15: Does the housing agency screen tenants with vouchers?


BCHA screens its participants for program eligibility, including obtaining a criminal background report from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, but does not screen tenants. It is imperative that each landlord conduct their normal screening procedures, just as they would screen any tenant regardless of whether they receive housing assistance. The landlord should obtain a Social Security number, references, contact information for current and previous landlords, credit history, employment history, criminal record, etc., and check the information carefully.


16: How can I market my unit to program participants?


If you would like to rent to a tenant that receives housing assistance, you should note in your advertisement that they are willing to accept rental assistance or tenants with a housing voucher. If you have many units and would like to be listed on our landlord list, please contact us. Note: this list is a better resource for those landlords/property management companies that have many units to offer, rather than one or two because they may receive many calls, and often.


17: Am I allowed to rent to a relative?


HUD regulations prohibit BCHA from allowing a program participant to rent a unit from a relative. The only exception is for BCHA to determine that such a situation would provide a Reasonable Accommodation for a household member who is a person with disabilities. In this case, your tenant/relative would need to contact their case manager to complete required forms. Each request is considered on a case-by-case basis by a committee.


18: If I rent to one tenant with a voucher, do I have to rent to others with a voucher?


No, you may choose if/when to rent to tenants receiving housing assistance.


19: Does BCHA provide a specific lease for their residents? If not, what information should I include in my lease?


BCHA does not provide leases for their residents; each landlord must provide their own. BCHA may require and provide addendums to the lease. The initial lease must be for a one-year term, with the option to rent on a monthly basis thereafter. The lease should include names of the landlord and tenant (and all household members), unit address, lease term, monthly rent amount, which utilities are paid by the tenant and which are paid by the landlord, which appliances are provided and other items as long as they are consistent with the laws.


20: Who pays the security deposit?


Your tenant is responsible for paying the security deposit.


21: What does the housing inspector look for during an annual inspection?


Effective July 1, 2009, Colorado House Bill 1091 requires homeowners and owners of rental property (single-family homes, multi-family homes) to install carbon monoxide alarms near the bedrooms (or other room lawfully used for sleeping purposes) in every home that is heated with natural gas or propane, has a gas appliance, has a fireplace, or has an attached garage. This requirement applies to every home that is sold, remodeled, repaired, or leased to a new tenant after July 1, 2009, including landlords participating in the program. For more information, please research House Bill 1091.


22: What is the Carbon Monoxide Detector Law and does it apply to me, as a landlord?


Effective July 1, 2009, Colorado House Bill 1091 requires homeowners and owners of rental property (single-family homes, multi-family homes) to install carbon monoxide alarms near the bedrooms (or other room lawfully used for sleeping purposes) in every home that is heated with natural gas or propane, has a gas appliance, has a fireplace, or has an attached garage. This requirement applies to every home that is sold, remodeled, repaired, or leased to a new tenant after July 1, 2009, including landlords participating in the program. For more information, please research House Bill 1091.


23: How much rent can I charge?


The rent amount must not exceed BCHA’s payment standard. This amount is based on local fair market rents, which are the average gross rents (including utilities) being paid in the specific community for modest housing units of varying sizes. Your tenant’s case manager is not able to provide you with information regarding maximum rent you can charge, however they will let you know if you exceed it.


24: Can I request a rent increase, and if so, how do I do that?


Each year, three months prior to the lease end date, you will have an opportunity to state whether you want to extend the lease term, and if so, whether the amount will change and by how much. If you request an increase after the initial term of the lease and within the current lease period, you must provide at least 60 days written notice of any increase to your tenant’s case manager. The proposed increase must not exceed the payment standards. BCHA reserves the right to deny any increase found to be unreasonable based on market conditions or delay the start of increases when proper notice has not been given.


25: When will I receive the rent, and how do I get paid?


Payments begin after the HAP Contract is executed, usually within 30-45 days. Though uncommon, a delay of up to 60 days may occur before the first payment. Staff will communicate payment arrangements with you at lease-up. The program directly deposits BCHA’s rent portion on the 1st business day of each month, and continues as long as the tenant remains eligible for the program and the rent amount does not exceed the program standards. A landlord may not penalize a tenant for any delay in the housing authority’s payment, as outlined in the Contract. The landlord is responsible for collecting the tenant’s rent each month and enforcing the lease if their portion is not paid in full and on time.


26: Does the tenant pay for utilities?


The landlord determines which utilities, if any, they will provide as a part of the rent and which utilities their tenant will be responsible for. If your tenant is paying a utility, BCHA will credit the household with a utility allowance, based on the average cost of utilities, size of the unit, and the location of the unit; not on the household’s actual energy consumption.


27: Who pays if my tenant damages my unit?


Your tenant is responsible for damages. While we educate our participants about responsible tenancy, each landlord must actively manage all of their rental properties, including those occupied by tenants receiving housing assistance. No one can guarantee that a tenant, regardless of whether they receive housing assistance, will not damage a unit. However, if a landlord enforces the lease by sending notices and warnings, and if landlord obligations as required by the HAP Contract are met, the tenant’s case manager can assist with issues by reminding participants of their program obligations. Sometimes, a landlord may choose to evict a tenant and even sue for damages just as with any tenant. The risk of problems can be reduced through a landlord’s comprehensive screening policy and adherence to it.


28: What if I have a problem with a tenant?


You should interact with your tenant as you would with any tenant you have. The tenant’s case manager should be notified in circumstances such as unpaid rent, additional household members not listed on the lease; the use, sale or manufacturing of illegal drugs; or violence and/or domestic abuse. You should community with your tenant on other lease issues such as property maintenance, noise issues, pet concerns, parking issues, and property entrance agreements. If you are uncertain about which issues should be brought to staff, please contact the case manager.


29: May I evict a tenant who is participating in the Housing Assistance Programs?


You may evict a tenant. In that event, you must notify BCHA in writing of the tenant’s lease violations and eviction actions, and provide all documentation of legal notices and warning letters provided to the tenant(s). You may not, however, evict a tenant for non-payment of the BCHA’s rent portion.


30: What types of actions may lead to termination from the program?


The following are some actions that may lead to program termination: fraud (i.e., providing false information or documentation), non-compliance with program requirements, criminal or drug activity, unauthorized household members, non-compliance with a lease. If a program participant is terminated, they will receive a termination letter which informs them of their opportunity to present their case to the Housing Board for reinstatement. BCHA and HUD are stringent regarding program compliance and will take action as necessary.


31: What is The Violence against Women Act (VAWA) and how does it affect a participant’s assistance?


The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is a federal law, effective 2006, to protect individuals who are victims of domestic violence by prohibiting apartment firms from evicting the resident because of criminal activity committed by a member of the victim’s household.


32: How can I find out more information about tenant participation?


To learn more information about tenant participation, please refer to Frequently Asked Questions for Tenants.


33: What if I have questions that have not been answered?


If you have questions that have not been answered, please contact the BCHA office at 303/441-3929.


 Staff

Housing Assistance Programs Staff

Below is a list of Housing Assistance Programs staff. If you are a program participant and have questions, please contact your designated Occupancy Assistant/Case Manager. If you are a landlord and have questions, please contact your tenant’s Occupancy Assistant. If you are not a participant and have general questions about the programs, please call BCHA main phone number.

Boulder Office: 2525 13th Street, Suite 204, Boulder, CO  80304
Longmont Office: 1288 Alaska Avenue, Longmont, CO 80501
BCHA Main Phone Number: 303/441-3929

Amanda Guthrie, Program Manager
720/564-2280; aguthrie@bouldercounty.org
Boulder Office

Annette Reyes, Housing Occupancy Assistant
303/441-1542; areyes@bouldercounty.org
Boulder Office

Cheryl Sears, Housing Occupancy Assistant and Portability Specialist
303/682-6735; csears@bouldercounty.org
Longmont Office

Elissa Plancher, Housing Occupancy Assistant
720/564-2277; eplancher@bouldercounty.org
Boulder Office

Julia Grubb, Housing Occupancy Assistant and Waitlist Administrator
720-564-2287; jgrubb@bouldercounty.org
Boulder Office

 Report Fraud

To Report Fraud

BCHA is committed to protecting the integrity of the Housing Choice Voucher Program. If you have reason to believe that any fraudulent activity is taking place in connection with participants in any of the Housing Assistance Programs, please call the Affordable Housing Programs Manager at 720/564-2280.

 Forms

Forms For Participants

Disability Verification Form

Documentation Verification List
For your reference, this document lists acceptable sources of verification.

Child Care Provider form
If you have new or updated child care expenses, please sign this form and submit it to your case manager to send to your child care provider.

Fair Housing Information
For your reference, this document details your rights.

Family Request for Portability form
If you would like to transfer your voucher to another county, please complete this form and submit it to your case manager.

Landlord List
For your reference, this document lists contact information for some landlords that rent to other Boulder County Section 8 participants.

Live-In Aide Requirements

Notice of Intention to Move
If you are interested in moving out of your current residence at the end of your lease, you may complete this form and give it to your current landlord.

Mutual Rescission of Lease
If you are interested in moving out of your current residence in the middle of your lease term, you may complete this form and give it to your landlord to sign if they will approve. A copy of the completed form must be provided to your case manager.

Payment Standards (for Boulder County and Broomfield)
For your reference, this list details maximum rent amounts based on number of bedrooms.

Section 214 Status form
If you add a household member, please complete this form and submit it to your case manager.

Student Status form

Tenant Responsibilities form
For your reference, this document explains obligations of households’ receiving housing assistance.

Utility Allowance (for Boulder County and Broomfield)
For your reference, this list details which utilities are included in your housing payments, and if so, how much, based on number of bedrooms and locations.

Vacated Family Member Affidavit
If a household member is moving out, please sign this form (in front of a notary) and submit it to your case manager.

Verification of Earnings form
If your income has changed, please sign this form and submit it to your case manager to send to your employer.

Victims’ Rights Information


Zero Income Verification Form

Forms For Landlords

2013 Utility Allowance for Boulder County

 Related Links

Contacts

Housing & Human Services - Housing Division

Phone: 303-441-3929
TTY: 1-800-659-3656
Fax: 720-564-2283
Submit a question or comment

Boulder

2525 13th St, Suite 204
Map & Directions
Hours: 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. M-F

Mailing Address

P.O. Box 471
Boulder, CO 80306

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