Boulder Countyhttp://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/Boulder County NewsResidents Invited to Give Input on Sustainability Programming and Potential Funding SourcesBoulder County, Colo. – All members of the public are invited to a hearing on the future of sustainability funding in Boulder County. The current status and accomplishments of Boulder County’s environmental sustainability initiatives will be discussed in a presentation by staff and a presentation of countywide polling will be presented by Talmey-Drake Research & Strategy. 

What: Conversation on how to move environmental sustainability priorities forward 
When: Tuesday, April 22, 4 p.m.
Where: County Courthouse, Commissioners’ Hearing Room, 3rd Floor, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

Residents and area businesses and non-profits will also have an opportunity to provide input to the Commissioners on future priorities for sustainability programming and whether the county should pursue an ongoing funding mechanism to support programs such as zero waste, water conservation and energy efficiency as well as additional infrastructure to support sustainability initiatives. 

The Commissioners will be asked to discuss options for a future funding mechanism for sustainability programs and to give staff direction moving forward. 

For more information about sustainability programs in Boulder County, visit www.BoulderCountySustainability.org or contact Susie Strife, at 303-441-4565 or sstrife@bouldercounty.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4009Thu, 17 Apr 2014 10:00:00
High Hazard Projects – Status for Week of April 14Boulder County has started work in many creek corridors to remove hazards from the creeks, work includes high hazard debris removal, stream bank stabilization, and the removal of hazardous homes. The list below includes both work in progress and work projected to start this week. Please note that project schedules may shift due to several factors, including weather, contractor equipment staging, and the ability to obtain sufficient Right of Entry permissions from property owners.

Lefthand Creek
  • Work is ongoing throughout Lefthand Canyon, including:
    • At and below Lickskillet (mostly woody debris removal)
    • Area surrounding Buckingham Park
    • Streamcrest Drive NRCS designed and funded creek realignment and sediment removal work

James Canyon
  • Work is ongoing throughout James Canyon

Fourmile Canyon Drive
  • Work is ongoing in upper Fourmile

Apple Valley
  • NRCS designed and funded work in Apple Valley

Little Thompson
  • Work will start week of 4/14

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4008Thu, 17 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Missing Longmont Woman Found Deceased

MEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

Operations Division

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup

Commander
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Tuesday, April 15, 2014

 

Missing Person-UPDATE

BOULDER COUNTY- On Monday, April 14, 2014, at about 5:32 p.m. Boulder Communications received a telephone call from a residence in the 13200 block of North 87th Street.  They said they believed there was a person laying in their alfalfa field.  Deputies responded and found the body that was later identified as that of Jessica Lynn Shackelford (a.k.a. Jessica Lynn Musgrave).  The investigation into her death is ongoing, but there were no obvious indication of the cause of death.  An autopsy was performed today and the Coroner’s Office will release the cause and manner of death when it is determined.  This release was held pending notification of relatives.   

On Saturday, April 12, 2014, at approximately 8:00 p.m. 31 year-old Jessica Lynn Shackelford left her home in the 12900 block of Hillcrest Drive, Longmont, on foot.  She and her husband had an argument prior to her leaving the residence.  Jessica has not been heard from since she left.  It is unusual for Jessica to be out of contact with her family for this length of time. 

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1892

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4007Tue, 15 Apr 2014 10:00:00
UPDATE: Cycling restrictions in Lefthand Canyon extend from U.S. 36 to Hwy 72, continue through May 1Boulder County, Colo. – Lefthand Canyon from U.S. 36 to Peak to Peak Highway, and James Canyon from Lefthand Canyon to Balarat Road will be closed to cyclists 7 days per week until May 1 while crews remove major debris hazards from the area before spring runoff and continue road construction. 

This is an update to the previous press release due to ongoing debris removal.

What: Lefthand Canyon and James Canyon temporarily closed to cyclists 7 days per week
When: April 4 - May 1
Who: Cyclists
Where: Lefthand Canyon from U.S. 36 to Peak to Peak, and James Canyon from Lefthand Canyon to Balarat Road

In order to expedite the hazardous debris removal by a May 1 deadline, and to mitigate a safety risk, we are asking cyclists to respect the temporary restrictions. We are also asking motorists to avoid the canyons unless travel is necessary.  

“Due to unsafe conditions on the roadways such as steep drop-offs along the roadways from washed-away ditches and washed-away roadway shoulders, plus the increased volumes of heavy construction and road maintenance equipment along compromised roadways, so we can remove debris before spring runoff, we ask that cyclists stay out of the canyons if possible,” said Transportation Director George Gerstle. “While these conditions are experienced by both motorists and bicyclists, bicyclists are much more likely to have their safety compromised.”

Residents who need to ride a bike on this area for basic transportation purposes can contact the Sheriff’s Office at 303-441-3650 for a permit.

We want to remind all residents that while we are making progress on repairing the roads, and removing debris, we still have more to do (please refer to www.BoulderCountyFlood.org for updates). 

For more information about this temporary closure, call the Transportation Department at 303-441-3900. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4006Tue, 15 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Tainted Meatballs

 

 


MEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

Operations Division

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup

Commander
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Tuesday, April 15, 2014




TAINTED MEATBALLS:  UPDATE

BOULDER COUNTY- As of 11:00 a.m. today a total of 6 meatballs containing suspected poison have been located in the private park near the intersection of Buckingham Road and Spy Glass Court, in Gunbarrel, unincorporated Boulder County.  Samples of the meatballs have been taken to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Colorado State University to determine what the chemical compound is in the meat.   

Pet owners are warned to be attentive to what your animals are snacking on as you walk them in the area.  If you locate anything that is suspicious, please contact the Sheriff’s Office Communications at 303-441-4444. 

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1915

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

 


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4005Tue, 15 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Structure Fire: 188 Silver Cloud LaneBOULDER COUNTY- On April 14, 2014 at approximately 6:30 PM, Thomas and Suzanne Young called the Boulder County Communications Center, reporting that they smelled smoke in their residence at 188 Silver Cloud Lane.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office and fire personnel from the Boulder Rural Fire, Boulder Mountain Fire, Lefthand Fire and Boulder County Emergency Services responded. The fire was quickly extinguished and appears to have been electrical in nature. Further investigation is being conducted by the Boulder County Multi Agency Fire Investigation Team (MAFIT).

No one was injured in the fire but the house did sustain moderate damage.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4003Tue, 15 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Poisoned Meatballs in Park: 5150 Buckingham RoadBOULDER COUNTY- During the early evening hours of April 14, 2014, the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office took several reports of finding raw meatballs containing rat poison in a neighborhood park located at 5150 Buckingham Road in Gunbarrel, just northeast of Boulder. It is presumed that the poisoned meatballs were left for pets to consume. Several were found and removed, but there may be more. Please use caution when utilizing the park to exercise your pets. If more are found, please report it to the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office.

At least one dog was treated by a local veterinarian. Matt Booth of Alpenglow Veterinarian Clinic in Boulder states that symptoms pet owners should be on the lookout for are; lethargy, decreased appetite, pale gums, difficulty breathing and unexplained bleeding or bruising. The symptoms may take two to three days to show. It is recommended that pets should be taken to a veterinarian if there is any chance that it may have consumed the poison, because it may be too late by the time the symptoms start showing.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the incident. If anyone has information that would assist in the investigation, we encourage them to call the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office at (303) 441-4444. You may reference case number 14-1915.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4002Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Missing Person, Jessica ShackelfordMEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

Operations Division

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup

Commander
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Monday, April 14, 2014

Missing Person

BOULDER COUNTY-On Saturday, April 12, 2014, at approximately 8:00 p.m. 31 year-old Jessica Lynn Shackleford left her home in the 12900 block of Hillcrest Drive, Longmont, on foot.  She and her husband had an argument prior to her leaving the residence.  Jessica has not been heard from since she left.  She was last known to be at a business in the 2200 block of Main Street in Longmont at about 8:40 p.m. on that same evening.  It is unusual for Jessica to be out of contact with her family for this length of time.  The Sheriff’s Office is asking anyone with information to contact our Communications Center at 303-441-4444.

Jessica is described as a white female, 5’8” tall, weighing 130 pounds.  She has black hair and green eyes.  She was last seen wearing a dark hoodie and dark pants with Sketcher brand shoes and possibly a gray beanie cap with a white horizontal stripe. 

Jessica Lynn Shackleford
Jessica Lynn Shackleford
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4001Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners Seek Public Comment on Potential Expansion Plans for Eldora Mountain ResortBoulder County, Colo. – The Board of County Commissioners is interested in receiving input from Boulder County residents concerning the Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forests and Pawnee National Grassland (ARP) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for expansion of the Eldora Mountain Resort.

 

The ARP has prepared the DEIS in response to the ski resort's request to implement projects from its 2011 Master Plan. The document analyzes the various impacts to the environment that could occur as a result of changes to the resort on public land managed by the ARP.

 

The draft includes two “action alternatives” -- one that would allow for expansion of the ski area operations to the north toward Middle Boulder Creek, and the other that would allow for expansion of operations south into Gilpin County in the Jenny Creek area.

 

The public was invited to provide comments on the DEIS directly to the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service by April 14. Boulder County has been given permission to supplement its comments after that date, and will be seeking public input in-person at Thursday’s hearing or by email by April 17.   

 

The Commissioners would like to hear from members of the public on this topic to inform these supplemental comments. The purpose of the hearing on Thursday is to identify the public’s interests and concerns regarding the alternatives analyzed in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

 

When:  4 p.m., Thursday, April 17

Where: Courthouse Hearing Room, 3rd Floor, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder (map)

What:  Public Hearing concerning Eldora Mountain Resort Ski Area Projects Draft Environmental Impact Statement

 

The DEIS document and additional information can be found on the US Forest Service website for the project: http://www.eldoraeis.com. A copy of the Commissioners' initial comments to the USFS are provided here.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=4000Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Nederland and Allenspark Community Forestry Sort Yards Open in MayExtended sort yard hours provide landowners double the opportunity to implement effective wildfire mitigation on their land.

Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Forest Health Initiative is pleased to announce expanded Community Forestry Sort Yard operating hours for 2014. Both the Allenspark and Nederland area sort yards will be open for a majority of the summer.  

This summer marks the seventh consecutive year that Boulder County has operated sort yards in the mountains. Landowners can drop off slash and logs free of charge at either sort yard location. The sort yard program has proven to be an extremely valuable resource for area residents. Last year 629 landowners dropped material off at the sort yards. 

“We are excited to offer residents a significantly longer operational schedule in 2014. Each year residents have been asking for additional hours and we are finally able to accommodate their request,” said Ryan Ludlow, outreach forester with the county’s Land Use Department. “We are hopeful the extended hours will provide residents even more opportunity to get out on their land and create effective wildfire mitigation and to battle bark beetle infestations.” 

Allenspark/Meeker Park Area Sort Yard - 8200 Hwy 7, Allenspark
  • Opens: May 1st – Closes: Oct. 18th
  • Hours of Operation: Wednesday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Nederland Area Sort Yard - 291 Ridge Road, Nederland 
  • Opens: May 7th – Closes: Oct. 18th
  • Hours of Operation: Wednesday thru Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Both sort yards will be closed on July 4 and 5th and may have additional closures due to weather and administrative requirements. To check the operational status, please call 303-678-6368.

We need your help – Volunteer as a Community Forestry Sort Yard Host!
Volunteer Sort Yard Hosts are needed at the Allenspark and Nederland Community Forestry Sort Yard to make sure that the yards continue to be a local hub of community-based forestry information. 

Volunteer Sort Yard Hosts will greet people as they enter the yard, collect data on the material they are delivering, and provide outreach to sort yard users about forest ecology, bark beetles, and wildfire mitigation. Volunteers will not be responsible for helping unload logs and slash. 

We are looking for individuals who can commit 10-15 hours per month in 4 hour shifts on Wednesdays and Saturdays. Ideal volunteers will be able to commit to volunteering for at least 12 weeks during the sort yard season. For more information and/or to receive an application, contact Shane Milne at 303-678-6089 or smilne@bouldercounty.org.  

For more information about the sort yard program or how to implement proactive wildfire mitigation on your land, contact Ryan Ludlow, Boulder County Forest Health Initiative’s outreach forester, at 720-564-2641 or rludlow@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3999Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Structure Fire: 721 Cougar DriveBOULDER COUNTY- On April 14, 2014 at 12:06 a.m., the Boulder County Communications Center received a call from the occupants of 721 Cougar Drive, reporting that they had smoke coming from their fireplace and requested assistance. Shortly thereafter, they reported that the home was on fire.

Sheriff’s deputies and fire personnel from Rocky Mountain Fire, 4-Mile Fire, Nederland Fire, Louisville Fire, Coal Creek Fire and Boulder Mountain Fire responded to find that there was an active fire in the home. The two residents, Eric Ludemann and Christopher Dixon, evacuated and were unharmed. The fire was extinguished but the home did sustain substantial damage.

An investigator from the Multi Agency Fire Investigation Team (MAFIT) was called out; however, there does not appear to be any foul play at this time. This incident is documented in Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, case number 14-1895.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3997Mon, 14 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Flagstaff Road Repairs – Community Open House, Wednesday, April 16Residents, motorists and cyclists who access Flagstaff Road to and from Boulder are invited to attend a community open house to discuss road repairs needed for the slide area approximately 1000 feet above Gregory Lane on Flagstaff Road

 

Boulder County, Colo. – Flagstaff Road was badly damaged by the September 2013 Flood, including a major slope failure that washed away a 200-foot section of the uphill lane approximately 1000 feet above Gregory Lane. (map)

 

Temporary measures were put in place immediately following the flood to provide interim, one-lane access to area residents and visitors, but permanent repairs are needed to ensure long term safety for all future uses of Flagstaff Road. While details have not been finalized, construction is slated to begin in mid- to late-June 2014.

 

The repairs will require the construction of a 200-foot long bridge in the uphill lane to span the slide area. Constructing a new bridge within such a limited physical space (a 12-foot-wide section bordered by a sheer vertical slope on one side and a steep rocky drop-off on the other) will require Flagstaff Road be closed completely to all vehicle, bicycle and foot traffic for a 7-hour period each weekday.

 

Specifically, the section of road being repaired will be closed to all traffic on a Monday through Friday schedule, from 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., for the estimated 5-month project duration. The road will remain open and passable outside of those hours on weekdays and all day on weekends. The county has reached out to area residents and businesses, Boulder Valley School District, and other community partners about the potential impacts of the impending project.

 

Residents, motorists and cyclists who access Flagstaff Road to and from Boulder are invited to attend Wednesday’s open house to discuss the road repair project and to go over public safety measures that will be put in place during the construction period to allow access for emergency response during the scheduled road closures.

 

What:              Flagstaff Road Slide Repair Community Open House

When:             5 – 6: 30 p.m., Wednesday, April 16

Where:            Transportation Planning & Engineering Offices, 2nd Floor Conference Room, 2525 13th Street, Boulder (map)

 

County staff will be available for questions and comments during the open house.

 

For more information or to submit comments, please contact Lesley Swirhun, Boulder County Transportation, at 720-564-2656 or lswirhun@bouldercounty.org.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3996Fri, 11 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Property owners with flood damage reminded of the April 25 voluntary buyout deadlineBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is currently identifying properties for application in FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP). All interested property owners must give intent to apply for the program by April 25 to be eligible.

Funds from the HMGP program will be used to acquire, elevate or structurally retrofit properties that were substantially damaged in the 2013 Flood and are vulnerable to future disasters.

Property acquisition, better known as buyouts, is the most well-known function of the HMGP program. In this portion of the program, funds are used to buy out properties damaged during flooding, demolish them, and return the land to its natural state. Removal of these properties will prevent future losses occurring and will also give property owners an opportunity to recoup a large part of their investment in property that has lost some, if not most, of its value due to damage

Participation in the HMGP program is voluntary for all parties involved. Property owners who have sustained damage as a result of the 2013 Flood may be eligible to participate in the program. Residents interested in funding who have not already contacted Boulder County should do so immediately, before the deadline passes.

All interest property owners or those who have questions should contact the Boulder County HMGP Information Hotline at 866-953-2325 or email buyout@bouldercounty.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3995Fri, 11 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners Announce 2014 Volunteer Awards Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Commissioners recognized the important role that volunteers play in the community by hosting a volunteer recognition event on April 10 and awarding $6,000 for 14 program proposals.

On an annual basis, Boulder County invites volunteers from county programs to submit proposals requesting up to $500 per proposal. Proposals may seek to fund an innovative new idea or can be used to enhance an existing volunteer program. The volunteers whose proposals are chosen by a selection committee are individually recognized during the ceremony and the funding goes to the programs in which they participate.

The volunteer recipients for this year are listed below by department/office:

Community Services Department

Traci Lundstrom, Justice System Volunteer Program - $350 to purchase yoga mats and other yoga supplies to be used by participants in the Jail Education and Transition Program.

Linda Thiemann, Medicare Counseling Program, Area Agency on Aging - $425 to purchase Microsoft OneNote software licenses for volunteers to use to electronically access Medicare reference materials and to purchase tote bags that volunteers can use to carry their laptops and additional Medicare materials.

District Attorney’s Office

Felisa Marcia & Dolores Sargent, Community Protection, Justice System Volunteer Program - $500 to create two videos regarding current community protection issues to be used for outreach and education to the public, including older adults and Spanish-speakers, and to help train volunteers. 

Nancy Raymond, Victim/Witness Assistance Program, Justice System Volunteer Program - $425 to purchase select books to loan to victims and witnesses of crime and to educate volunteers.

Housing & Human Services Department

April Anders & Ty Ridenour, Youth Advisory Board, Family & Children Services - $400 to create and print copies of a resource book regarding topics such as housing, budgeting, and education for youth and young adults.

Monica Gonzalez, Casa de la Esperanza - $500 to purchase guiding texts, reading materials and digital cameras for a summer seminar focusing on community leadership and self-empowerment for 6th-12th grade students.

Parks & Open Space Department

Jennifer Archuleta, Volunteer Trail Crew Leaders - $500 toward the total cost of bringing in a professional trainer to lead an advanced rock skills training for Crew Leaders, advanced volunteers, and partner agency volunteers. Rock work is a specialized skill used by land agencies where high use or erosion events like flooding occur.

Candice Bartholomew Brown, 4-H, Extension - $500 to purchase 2 robotics STEM kits and software to be used by an afterschool 4-H STEM club, thus making robotics more accessible to children from any socioeconomic background. 

Mark Granger, Native Plant Monitors - $500 to purchase materials and supplies needed to assemble 3 new bins to be used by volunteer Native Plant Monitors.

Susan M. Jones, Volunteer Naturalists - $200 to purchase 2 Handi-Movers to assist Volunteer Naturalists in transporting wildlife taxidermy mounts and other interpretive resources to program sites throughout the county.

Maikel Wise, Volunteer Trail Crew Leaders - $240 to purchase materials to build 6 new willow probes and retrofit 2 old probes, which will be used to help restore riparian areas affected by the 2013 flood among other areas.

Public Health Department

Kathy Ahl, Sandy Friedman, Heidi Lynch & Sheila Maloney, Children with Special Needs Program - $460 to purchase tote bags, age-appropriate toys for volunteers to use when engaging with special needs children in the Give-A-Break Volunteer Program and books to leave with the children.

Lindsay Parsons, GENESISTER Program - $500 to bring in guest speakers to discuss education planning and career options with the young women in the GENESISTER program, binders to track their career materials, and roller skating admission to give the teens some time to get together to reflect on their experiences and have some fun.

Chastity “Chaz” Stacey, Medical Reserve Corps of Boulder County - $500 to purchase a moulage kit, along with various mock injury supplies, which will help during the training of emergency response teams participating in community exercises.

This ceremony is one of many ways Boulder County celebrates local volunteerism and the impact that volunteers have in our community.

To see our current volunteer opportunities and learn more about our programs, please visit www.BoulderCountyVolunteers.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3994Thu, 10 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Annual Senior Fish off is Just Around the Cornerhttp://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3993Boulder County Issues Floodplain Management Plan Annual Report

Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Transportation Department, as a required function of its participation in the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System, has issued its annual progress report for the Floodplain Management Plan.* 

 

The report, entitled “Boulder County 2013 Floodplain Management Activities Summary and Update,” may be viewed on the county’s website at www.bouldercounty.org/property/flood/.

 

Activities for the Floodplain Management Plan are outlined in Boulder County’s Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, which was completed and adopted in 2008. The Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, including floodplain and all other hazard activities, will be updated in 2014.
 
Contact: Dave Webster, 720-564-2660
 
 
*NOTE: The 2013 annual progress report of the county’s floodplain management program is a required activity of its participation in the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System (CRS). Each year, communities are required to recertify their activities in CRS over a twelve month period. Boulder County’s recertification is due October 1st each calendar year. Due to the September 2013 Flood, Boulder County was given a six month extension to complete its CRS recertification. Although the progress report was delivered in April 2014, the reporting period is 10/1/2012 – 10/1/2013 and does not include many detailed activities relative to the September 2013 Flood. The 2014 annual progress report (due by October 2014) will cover post-flood response and activities in more detail.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3992Thu, 10 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Innovative Bicycle Counting Procedure Gains National AttentionBoulder County, Colo. – Thanks to a new technique, Boulder County was able to count bikes on the roadways at over 100 locations in 2013. County staff presented their work at three national conferences over the past several months and the research was just published in February’s Institute of Transportation Engineers Journal which reaches more than 18,000 subscribers.

It is widely recognized that better bicycle data could help prioritize maintenance and capital improvements to enhance bicycle safety and comfort, but counting bicycles on roads with bike lanes and shoulders has historically been too expensive for many agencies to perform. The specialized hardware, software and staff management leaves most city, county and state governments with only anecdotal data on the location, time of day and volume of cyclist on the roads. 

For many decades, the Boulder County Transportation Department has had dedicated staff and budget to obtain 24-hour vehicle counts at close to 300 locations throughout the county. The new bicycle research focused on how to accurately collect bicycle data using the existing vehicle counting equipment, thus leveraging a standing investment. 

Vehicle counters had been counting some bikes, but the software was incorrectly categorizing them as trucks and/or motorcycles. Through additional research and experimentation, staff was able to make small tweaks to the traditional tubes to get more statistically reliable bike-count data. Initial data has been valuable in determining what days of the week and what times of day cyclists are using the road network. Using before and after data of road segments with recently-added bike shoulders, staff expect to determine the effect that enhanced facilities have on cycling.

“Swapping out the existing tubes with slightly thinner tubes and changing the connections to the counter box now gives us satisfactory level of accuracy for bikes,” said Alex Hyde-Wright, Assistant Transportation Planner.

Staff hopes to continue to develop the counting technique this summer when the counting program starts up again. 

To see these results of the bicycle counts, visit www.bouldercounty.org/bikecount and click on the 2013 Bicycle Count volumes maps. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3991Thu, 10 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office says Thank You for VolunteeringBOULDER COUNTY-April 6-13, 2014 is National Volunteer Appreciation Week.  To celebrate our volunteers the Operations Division of the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is thanking them with dinner and a movie.  Volunteers supported the Sheriff’s Office with over 7000 hours of their time in 2013.  Their services included victim advocacy, Restorative Justice Conferences, Reserve Deputies who ride with Deputies as a second officer, or assist Deputies in our Jail, and a multitude of other tasks that need to be accomplished on a daily basis.

We are grateful for the time and dedicated service our volunteers provide to the Sheriff’s Office, and the citizens of our community.   

If you are interested in volunteering with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office please contact Commander Heidi Prentup at 303-441-3624 or
hprentup@bouldercounty.org

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3990Wed, 09 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Organizations Recognized for Their Work Improving the Environment, Saving Lives, and Reducing ObesityBoulder County Public Health will honor a high school club, a nonprofit, and a child care center for their exemplary work in improving the health of people in Boulder County. The Fairview High School Net Zero Club, the Harm Reduction Action Center (HRAC), and Junior Jets Child Development Center are the 2014 recipients of the Boulder County Public Health Healthy Community Award.

What: Boulder County Health Community Awards
When: Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 2 - 4 p.m.
Where: Sheriff Headquarters Training Room, 5600 Flatirons Parkway in Boulder

The Fairview High School Net Zero Club has been working since 2008 to create a greener school and community. The club has planted 59 trees on campus, improved recycling, supported the launch of school composting, and drastically reduced junk mail. The club has also harvested honeybees to bring awareness to the decline of the honeybee population and potential environmental impacts of pesticides.

In addition, club members have helped to develop local and state environmental protection policies, such as a plastic bag ban in the city of Boulder and an historic air quality regulation controlling emissions from oil and gas production. They attended and spoke out at city council meetings and state hearings, drafted an editorial, provided written testimony, and presented the issues to other students.

“These students have researched the topics, rallied other students and adults, and taken a leadership role to support our environment and our health,” said Pam Milmoe, Boulder County Public Health Air Quality/Business Sustainability Program Coordinator. “Their efforts have helped our community to eliminate waste, save money, and improve air quality for future generations.”

The new air quality regulations in Colorado for which the students testified, are the first in the country to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas production facilities. Annual methane reductions are estimated to be equivalent to taking 400,000 cars off the road.

Harm Reduction Action Center (HRAC) is a nonprofit organization in Denver that educates and advocates for the health and dignity of injection drug users and affected partners. HRAC has been instrumental in changing structures and laws that impeded people from getting services and supplies that prevent disease and save lives.

HRAC’s work has influenced the passing of major laws that impact the health of Colorado residents, such as the legalization of syringe access programs, including protection from paraphernalia laws, and allowing the prescription of an overdose-reversing drug, Naloxone or Narcan, to those who may witness an overdose so they can potentially save someone’s life.

In addition, HRAC worked closely with other partners, such as the Drug Policy Alliance, to enact the Good Samaritan law that encourages people who may witness an overdose to call for help without the fear of facing drug charges.

“Because of HRAC’s work, drug users across Colorado will be less likely to share injection equipment and get HIV or hepatitis C, and they’ll be less likely to die of an overdose,” said Carol Helwig, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease Control Program Coordinator.

Since October 2013, four overdose prevention training sessions have been held in Boulder County, and 23 people were trained and provided with naloxone prescriptions. Four overdose reversals have been reported to Boulder County Public Health thus far.

Junior Jets, a Longmont child care center serving children 6 weeks to 12 years old, is actively working to prevent early childhood obesity and promote the social and emotional health of children. The center provides training and puts policies in place that improve the health and well-being of the staff, families, and children they serve.

“The center director, Beth Cushing, has made improving health, safety, nutrition, and overall quality a priority,” said Sarah Scully, Boulder County Public Health Child Health Promotion Program Coordinator. “She supports staff training and professional development and builds in coverage so staff can take time out of the classroom to improve their skills.”

The center participates in multiple programs that focus on increasing physical activity throughout the day, improving the nutrition of foods served, reducing screen time, and supporting breastfeeding among staff and families.

“Overall, menus have improved substantially. Parents are replacing the sugary foods they used to bring in for celebrations with fruits and vegetables, and menus now use more whole grains, have more variety of fruits and vegetables, and do not include processed foods,” said Scully.

The center is also involved with the Kid Connects Mental Health Consultation Program to improve the capacity of caregivers to respond to the social and emotional needs of very young children.

The Boulder County Public Health Healthy Community Awards, developed in 2006, recognizes individuals and groups in the Boulder County community that address public health needs and issues. Up to three awards are given annually.

A Boulder County Public Health employee must nominate community members or organizations for the award, and a review committee of public health leaders selects award recipients.

www.BoulderCountyHealth.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3989Mon, 07 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Cycling restricted in Lefthand Canyon and James Canyon effective immediately until May 1Boulder County, Colo. – Lefthand Canyon from U.S. 36 to James Canyon, and James Canyon to Balarat Road will be closed to cyclists 7 days per week until May 1 while crews remove major debris hazards from the area before spring runoff and continue road construction. 

What: Lefthand Canyon and James Canyon temporarily closed to cyclists 7 days per week
When: Beginning April 4
Who: Cyclists
Where: From U.S. 36 to James Canyon, and from James Canyon to Balarat Road

In order to expedite the hazardous debris removal by a May 1 deadline, and to mitigate a safety risk, we are asking cyclists to respect the temporary restrictions. We are also asking motorists to avoid the canyons unless travel is necessary.  

“Due to unsafe conditions on the roadways such as steep drop-offs along the roadways from washed-away ditches and washed-away roadway shoulders, plus the increased volumes of heavy construction and road maintenance equipment along compromised roadways, so we can remove debris before spring runoff, we ask that cyclists stay out of the canyons if possible,” said Transportation Director George Gerstle. “While these conditions are experienced by both motorists and bicyclists, bicyclists are much more likely to have their safety compromised.”

Residents who need to ride a bike on this area for basic transportation purposes can contact the Sheriff’s Office at 303-441-3650 for a permit.

“Once again we want to thank everybody in advance for their cooperation so we can address the risk of spring runoff as quickly and safely as possible,” said Gerstle.

We want to remind all residents that while we are making progress on repairing the roads, and removing debris, we still have more to do (please refer to www.BoulderCountyFlood.org for updates). 

For more information about this temporary closure, call the Transportation Department at 303-441-3900. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3988Fri, 04 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Emergency warning sirens to be tested beginning April 7Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County and the City of Boulder will begin audible testing of the countywide emergency sirens at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 7. The test is the first of the monthly emergency audible siren tests, which take place each year on the first Monday of each month from April through August.

The audible siren tests will occur twice on each testing day, at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m., on April 7, May 5, June 2, July 7 and Aug. 4.

Siren tests ensure that all systems and procedures are working properly during the season of peak flood danger. The tests also promote public awareness of the warning sirens located throughout Boulder County.

Louisville, Superior and Jamestown sirens will only participate in the first audible test on April 7. After this test, residents in these communities will not hear the sirens unless there is an emergency.

The annual siren testing is a good reminder for residents to sign up for emergency alerts at www.BoCo911alert.com.

Should Boulder County experience severe weather during one of the planned audible tests, the siren tests for that day may be cancelled. For updated information, visit www.BoulderOEM.com.

Residents are encouraged to review their own emergency preparedness plans and discuss what they would do in the event of a flash flood or other emergency. For more information about personal preparedness, visit www.readycolorado.com.

For flood-related information specific to the City of Boulder, visit www.BoulderFloodInfo.net

For flood-related information specific to the Boulder County, visit www.BoulderCountyFlood.org

About the countywide alert system
Used to alert residents to potential danger from a flood or other immediate threat, there are 25 outdoor warning sirens in place across Boulder County, including in Boulder, Erie, Jamestown, Lafayette, Louisville, Lyons, Marshall, Eldorado Springs, Superior and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

All Boulder County sirens undergo weekly tests throughout the year, using a software program that performs a “silent” test.

For more information, visit www.BoulderOEM.com.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3986Thu, 03 Apr 2014 10:00:00
Motor Vehicle New Print-on-Demand License Plate SystemThe Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office is very excited to announce that Boulder County Motor Vehicle offices are part of a pilot program to save taxpayers money!

Going forward, specialty license plates will only be printed when they are ordered. This new system is meant to eliminate the waste of unused license plates, greatly reduce county inventory of license plates on warehouse shelves, and save everyone money.
 
The Department of Revenue estimates that there will be an annual savings of $890,000 due to this new “Print on Demand” system.
 
Here are a few frequently asked questions on the Print on Demand system:
 
What is Print on Demand?
Colorado has 133 different types of license plates and more than twice as many inventory types (such as passenger car, truck, etc.). It costs millions of dollars to maintain this inventory, some of which is never used. Print on demand eliminates the waste, greatly reduces county inventories and saves money. All county offices will still have the regular plates on hand to distribute, however, all other plates – designer, alumni, military and other plates – will be printed on demand and mailed to the customer within 10 days of ordering.
 
How long does it take to get specialized plates?
Plates will be sent via USPS and should arrive within 10 days of ordering. Included with the plates will be instructions on how to activate the license plates along with an activation code. Customers may activate the plates by phone or online. Plates will automatically activate after 30 days.
 
What if my temporary permit is about to expire?
If you have less than 30 days remaining on your temporary permit and would like to get a specialty plate, we’ll automatically issue you a new 30-day temporary permit, so you get the plates you want without the worry!
 
Why not keep the most popular designer or specialized plates on the shelves?
Each county is different. It would eliminate the cost-savings benefit if each county kept what their local residents ordered the most (after regular plates). But it only takes 10 days to get your specialized plates and we can extend your temporary permit if it is near expiring.
 
Is this happening statewide?
Yes, this program will be rolled out to all Counties by the end of June 2014. Boulder County is a pilot rollout along with two other counties for this cost-savings measure.
 
What will you do with all plates you currently have on your shelves?
All inventory will be returned to Colorado Correctional Industries and will be used to fulfill orders.  No new plates will be printed until current statewide inventories are depleted.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3985Thu, 03 Apr 2014 10:00:00
48 year-old Aurora Man Arrested by Boulder County Deputies after a Brief Pursuit in a Stolen Moving VanBOULDER COUNTY - At approximately 5:30 a.m. on March 27, 2014, Deputies of the Boulder County Sheriff's Office saw a moving van that had been reported stolen to the Wheatridge Police Department from 44th and Ward Road, where a car stolen from Adams County was found abandoned.  The van was traveling north on Hwy 36, north of the Boulder City Limits.  Boulder Police attempted to contact the vehicle in the City of Boulder, but they were unable to confirm it was stolen, as it had no rear license plate, when it failed to yield to them, they did not pursue.  Deputies were able to confirm the van was stolen, by the front plate.

Deputies followed the van east on Nelson Road, toward Longmont and attempted to stop the van as it approached 75th Street.  The driver failed to yield again and continued east driving over four separate sets of stop sticks, which deflated all of the van's tires. The van continued east into the City limits of Longmont, turned west onto Ken Pratt Parkway and left the City on Hwy 119. The driver turned off Hwy 119 onto the private property of Intrado Corp, where it struck a parked, but occupied vehicle (the occupant was not injured).  The van left the parking lot onto Dry Creek and became high centered on a curb.  The driver refused to exit the vehicle. Utilizing a bean bag round, Deputies broke out a window of the van and deployed gas, but the driver still refused to exit. Two Deputies entered through the passenger side and removed the driver, who was taken into custody. The van contained a television and empty boxes.

48 year-old Darell Dickens, date of birth 01/13/1966) of Aurora was taken into custody and transported to the hospital for treatment of self-inflicted injuries. Darell reported to Deputies that he was under the influence of methamphetamine and alcohol. Darell has a lengthy criminal history to include Assault on a Peace officer, Dangerous Drugs and Parole Violations.

At this point in the investigation the plan is to charge Darell Dickens with two active warrants (possession of dangerous drugs and assault on a peace officer) aggravated motor vehicle theft, driving under the influence of drugs, driving under restraint, eluding, leaving the scene of an accident, resisting arrest and additional traffic charges.


Darrel Dickens

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1597

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3984Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Rescue of Lost and Injured Hiker at the FlatironsBOULDER COUNTY-On March 26th, 2014, members of the Rocky Mountain Rescue Group, Boulder Fire Department, The City of Boulder Mountain Parks and Open Space and the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office responded to Chautauqua Park, located at 101 Blue Bell Road in unincorporated Boulder County, Colorado on the report of a stranded climber on the third Flatiron.

The 21 year old female was hiking on the 1-2 Trail and became stranded after climbing to a rock outcropping, approximately half way up the third Flatiron.  She sustained minor injuries to her knee.  The climber used her cell phone to call 911. 

Members with the Rocky Mountain Rescue Group scaled the third Flatiron and assisted the climber to safety, utilizing rope to execute a technical rescue.  The climber was evaluated by on-scene medical personnel and released from the scene.]]>
http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3983Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:00:00
The Sherriff’s Office Celebrated 103 Years of ServiceBOULDER COUNTY - On March 25, 2014, the Sherriff’s Office thanked three loyal employees for a combined 103 years of service to the community.  Business Analyst 2, Gary Anderson, 30-years; Deputy Russ Nanney, 33-years; Deputy/Reserve Deputy Dale Sherratt, 40-years.
 
Gary Anderson started with the Sheriff’s Office in March of 1984 as an IT specialist.  His first assignment was working with the rain gauges which served as the early warning system for high water notification in the County.  He was instrumental in the development and maintenance of the Sheriff’s Office computerized records management systems.  He established the foundation of the computer systems the Sheriff’s Office currently uses and created such a robust foundation that it will carry us well into the future.  Gary received three Meritorious Service Medals.  He was named the Support Services Employee of the year in 2012; receiving five Sheriff’s Commendations and was part of the Teamwork Excellence Award on two separate occasions.  Gary was the Sheriff’s Office go-to IT guy.
 
Deputy Russ Nanney started with the Sheriff’s Office in January of 1981.  He became a firearms instructor where he trained hundreds of Deputies to ensure safe and appropriate use of handguns, rifles and shotguns.  He was a member of the SWAT team, where he served as a sniper for 11 years.  He was a Detective for 7 years where he investigated several homicides as well as other felony cases.  Through his tenure as a School Resource Officer he had a positive impact on thousands of students at Niwot High School.  Russ received the Officer of the year award; a Meritorious service award, four Certificates of Commendation, three Captain’s Commendations, but most notable are the 69 letters from citizens acknowledging his compassion, professionalism, skill and knowledge.  Russ was a long-time advocate for the elder citizens of the County and will be missed for his compassion in dealing with issues they faced.
 
Deputy Dale Sherratt started as a Reserve Deputy in 1973.  Dale started a lucrative fundraising effort that eventually was able to provide equipment for the each Reserve Deputy in the unit.  Reserve Deputies are asked to commit 240 hours a year to the Sheriff’s Office, Dale regularly logged over 400 hours annually.  In 2009, after retiring from his fulltime job with Excel Energy, Dale became an hourly Deputy supporting our Civil Section and is noted as serving thousands of civil papers, even though he only worked part time.  Throughout his time with the Sherriff’s Office Dale received two Meritorious Service Medals, was recognized as the Reserve Deputy of the Year twice, received the Sheriff’s Office Volunteer Excellence award four times, was part of four teams that received the Unit Citation or Teamwork Award, he received two Sheriff’s Commendations and was recognized as the Everyday Hero, by Channel 7 News.  Dale was described as a hidden gem in Boulder County.


(L-R) Sheriff Joe Pelle, Gary Anderson, Russ Nanney, and Dale Sherratt
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3982Wed, 26 Mar 2014 10:00:00
IRS Gives Colorado Flood Victims More Time To Decide When To Claim LossesWashington D.C. – The Internal Revenue Service today provided taxpayers an extension until Oct. 15, 2014 to decide when to claim disaster losses arising from last September’s flooding.

The extension means that eligible individuals and businesses will now have until Oct. 15 to decide whether to claim these losses on either their 2012 or 2013 returns. Without this extension, these taxpayers would have had to make this choice by the original due date for the 2013 return, usually April 15.

Depending upon various income factors, claiming losses on a 2012 return versus a 2013 return could result in greater tax savings for some taxpayers. The extra time is available, regardless of whether a taxpayer requests a tax-filing extension for either year.

Eligible taxpayers are those who suffered uninsured or unreimbursed losses resulting from severe storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides in the 20 federally-designated disaster area counties from Sept. 11 to Sept. 30, 2013. The disaster area counties are Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Clear Creek, Crowley, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Gilpin, Jefferson, Lake, Larimer, Lincoln, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Sedgwick, Washington and Weld.

Though taxpayers who miss the new Oct. 15 cut-off will lose the option of claiming their losses for 2012, they will still be able to claim them on an original or amended 2013 return. Further details are in Notice 2014-20, posted today on IRS.gov and also scheduled to be in Internal Revenue Bulletin 2014-15, dated April 7, 2014.

For more information, call 800-829-1040 or visit www.irs.gov/newsroom.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3981Wed, 26 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Field Fire Quickly Extinguished by FD Field Fire Quickly Extinguished by FD

BOULDER COUNTY-At approximately 10:00 a.m. today the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, Rocky Mountain Fire and Louisville Fire Departments were dispatched to a wild land fire in Superior, CO.  The fire consumed an area approximately 25’ by 25’ in the Open Space at the intersection of Castle Peak Avenue and Rock Creek Circle.  No structures were damaged the Fire Departments that responded extinguished the fire. 

The fire was started by two juvenile males playing with matches.  The children were contacted and the Sheriff’s Office is working with the parents and the community to educate the children about the dangers of playing with matches. 

A message to parents, spring break is a great opportunity for children to take a break from school, but left to their own devices it is also an opportunity for them to get into mischief.    

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1581.

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3980Wed, 26 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Search and Rescue of Stranded ClimbersBOULDER COUNTY-  On Tuesday, March 25th, 2014 at approximately 08:06 pm, the Boulder County Communications Center received a call from two stranded climbers, who were requesting a rescue from the 1st Flatiron in the Chautauqua Park Open Space area.  The pair had successfully climbed the 1st Flatiron, but became stranded after dark as they attempted to rappel back down.

Deputies from the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, a Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Ranger, and members of the Rocky Mountain Rescue Group arrived to assist with the rescue.

Kurtis Anderson, 24, of Castle Rock, CO, and Konstyantyn Halonkin, 25, of Aurora, CO, were rescued from an area near the summit of the 1st Flatiron after changing course on their ascent and running out of daylight.  Once at the summit, Anderson and Halonkin were unable to find a rappelling anchor for their descent.  Although Anderson and Halonkin were experienced climbers and properly equipped with the necessary equipment for their climb, including cellphones, headlamps, and some cold weather gear, they did not have a proper route map for the area they were climbing. 

Rocky Mountain Rescue Group members reached Anderson and Halonkin at 10:22 pm and were able to help the climbers rappel down on their own.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1574]]>
http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3979Wed, 26 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Moises Mendez ExtraditionOn March 21, 2014 at approximately 1900 hours, Moises Mendez was extradited from San Diego, California. He is currently wanted for first-degree murder as well as violation of bail bond conditions in connection with the drug-related killing of Nathanial Tallman.

 

Moises Mendez will be incarcerated at the Boulder County Jail on a one million dollar bond for the first-degree murder warrant and a five hundred dollar warrant on the violation of bail bond conditions warrant. Moises Mendez will be scheduled for his first appearance court hearing on Monday, March 24, 2014.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3978Fri, 21 Mar 2014 10:00:00
2014 Colorado County Clerks Association Scholarship Application InformationNote:  This announcement has been shared with the public school districts that overlap Boulder County. 

Scholarship available to graduating senior – apply today!

The Colorado County Clerks Association will grant 4 regional one-time awards in the amount of $1,000 to seniors graduating from Colorado high schools.

Selection will be based on the following:

  • Completed application
  • 3.25 GPA Minimum
  • Community involvement with and interest in government, business or political science
  • Financial need/hardship

Financial aid awarded by the association will be remitted to the institution of attendance and will be credited to the student's account. The scholarship monies are to be used for tuition, books, and room and board expenses.

Each district will select a finalist and forward their selection to the Executive Board by April 25, 2014. Members of the Executive Board of the County Clerk's Association will finalize the scholarship awards by May 1, 2014. The scholarships will be awarded at graduation.

The local Boulder County student deadline to apply is Friday, April 4, 2014 (this deadline may be later than other counties). Please download the application here.
 
Questions? Please contact Mircalla Wozniak at mwozniak@bouldercounty.org or 303.413.7766.
 
Good luck to our local students!
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3977Thu, 20 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Public Meeting: Emergency work along St. Vrain Creek on county-owned land between U.S. 36 and Airport Road completed by April 1 Boulder County Parks and Open Space staff will update residents about emergency work that has been completed by BCPOS along St. Vrain Creek on county-owned land between U.S. 36 and Airport Road. The goal of the emergency work has been to mitigate impacts left by the September flood and to reduce future risks. Staff will present the work that has been completed to date and be available to answer questions.

BCPOS has been working diligently over the past six months to assess and mitigate the potential for future flooding along St. Vrain Creek between U.S. 36 and Airport Road due to the impacts of the September flood. As part of this assessment and mitigation, the department has had to determine necessary short-term emergency fixes that will help reduce further risks during spring run-off and summer storms. In addition, BCPOS has worked with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other federal, state, and local agencies to determine the appropriate measures and funding sources for this type of work.  

Based on these assessments and consultations, BCPOS identified three main breaches along St. Vrain Creek that required emergency repairs and, in addition, debris within the channel that would impede normal flow if not removed. This emergency work began in late December 2013 and will be completed by April 1, 2014. All emergency repairs completed to date are covered under FEMA and will help the creek stay within its pre-flood channel during a typical spring run-off event, thus helping to protect the public and public infrastructure along the creek corridor.  

For more information about the meeting or the work that has been completed, please visit www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org/stvrain or contact Ernst Strenge, BCPOS resource planner, at estrenge@bouldercounty.org or 303-678-6269.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3976Thu, 20 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County eliminates the practice of indiscriminate shackling of juveniles during court proceedingsCONTACT: Maria Campos Mozo, Community Justice Services, 303-441-3806

 

Public is invited to the Official Signing Ceremony of the Juvenile Restraint Reform Initiative on April 9  (invitation)

 

Boulder County, Colo. – The indiscriminate shackling of juvenile defendants – including the use of leg cuffs and chains, handcuffs, and waist belts which secure handcuffs at the waist (image examples) – is a common practice in juvenile courtrooms across the state of Colorado, with the notable exception of Boulder County as of January 15, 2014.

 

In June 2013, Boulder County, with full support of the Boulder County Commissioners whose jurisdiction includes the Community Justice Services division of Boulder County Community Services, established a Juvenile Restraint Reform Task Force consisting of key players from the Juvenile Justice System. The Task Force examined case law, best practices, and logistical issues surrounding the topic, and drafted criteria for sustainable Juvenile Restraint Reform.

 
Juvenile Restraint Reform Task Force Members
 

“We’re pleased to announce that as of January 15, 2014, juveniles will no longer be restrained in court except when ordered by the court during or prior to their hearing,” said Maria Campos Mozo, Juvenile Services Administrator with Boulder County Community Justice Services and Chair of the Juvenile Restraint Reform Task Force.

 

Indiscriminate shackling refers to the restraining of every juvenile arrested and transported to court without a determination of need for such restraints. It represents a complex issue in the juvenile justice system and has been broadly discussed on a national level by public defenders, juvenile advocates, and politicians alike.

 

“There is a growing trend towards eliminating indiscriminate shackling in the United States and Colorado, and we are proud to be doing this in Boulder County independent of a court order or legislation,” said Board of County Commissioners Chair Cindy Domenico.

 

The public is invited to attend the signing ceremony to honor the abolishment of the long standing practice of indiscriminate shackling of Boulder County juveniles during court proceedings.

 

What:           Juvenile Restraint Reform Initiative Official Signing Ceremony

When:          1 p.m., Wednesday, April 9

Where:        Courtroom P, Boulder County Justice Center, 1777 6th Street in Boulder

 

This change has become a national best practice recommendation made and supported by the Center for Juvenile Justice and the National Juvenile Defender Center amongst many other juvenile advocates across the country.

 

“Across the nation, new legislation with proposed amendments and court rulings have changed the approach juvenile courts are now taking around the indiscriminate shackling of juveniles,” said Lisa Polansky, Executive Director of the Center for Juvenile Justice and Task Force member. “This approach adds rules dictating that restraints, such as handcuffs and leg chains, cannot be used during juvenile court appearances unless the court finds that the use of restraints is necessary and reasonable.”

 

 “It is the stance of the Boulder County Juvenile Restraint Reform Task Force that juveniles should appear in court free of restraint, a philosophy we believe is in line with national trends and best practices, and most importantly ensures the greatest outcome for the juveniles served,” said Megan Ring, Managing Deputy State Public Defender of the Boulder Regional Office and Task Force member.

 

“The Community Justice Services Division and our partners, specifically the Boulder County Public Defender’s Office and the Center for Juvenile Justice, welcome this reform as well and it mirrors our county values of collaboration, responsive government, and integrity,” said Campos Mozo. She added, “By developing and implementing a sustainable plan for restraint reform in Boulder County, we can assist in planning efforts for other Judicial Districts within the State.”

 

-###-

 

Juvenile Restraint Reform Task Force Members include:

·         Chair: Maria Campos Mozo, Boulder County Community Justice Services

·         Judge Ingrid Bakke, Twentieth Judicial District Court

·         Alec Egizi, Boulder Regional Office of the Colorado State Public Defender

·         Carole Greenwell, Boulder County Community Justice Services

·         Sargent Tom McGrath, Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

·         Lisa Polansky, Center for Juvenile Justice

·         Michael Rafik, Colorado Criminal Defense Bar

·         Megan Ring, Boulder Regional Office of the Colorado State Public Defender

·         Dea Wheeler, Boulder County Attorney’s Office

 

Additional background:

The shackling of juveniles and subsequent bans is not a new phenomenon. Illinois eliminated its indiscriminate shackling policy in 1977. The 15 states that no longer shackle juvenile offenders as a result of State Supreme Court rulings or legislative action and the year they were implemented include: California – 2007, Connecticut – 2007, Florida – 2009, Illinois – 1977, Maine 2012, Massachusetts – 2010, New Mexico – 2007, New York – 2010, North Carolina – 2007, North Dakota – 2007, Ohio – 2012, Oregon – 1995, Pennsylvania – 2011, Vermont – 2009 and Washington – 2002.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3975Thu, 20 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Climber Rescue Eldorado State ParkMEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Wednesday March 19, 2014

CLIMBER RESCUE ELDORADO STATE PARK
 

BOULDER COUNTY- During the evening on Wednesday March 19, 2014, Boulder County dispatchers received a 911 call of a male who had fallen climbing in Eldorado Canyon State Park.  The 19 year old male fell from approximately 80-120 feet after a miscommunication with his climbing partner who was belaying him.  Responders to the scene included Rocky Mountain Rescue Group for a technical rescue. Rocky Mountain Fire, Louisville Fire and Flight for Life for emergency medical services.  The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office provided law enforcement and rescue assistance to those groups.

The male was transported via helicopter to a Lakewood Colorado hospital where he is being treated for his injuries which are not thought to be life threatening at this time.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1468

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org


# # #

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3974Thursday, March 19, 2014
Missing Endangered Male from SuperiorMEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup

Commander
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Wednesday, March 19, 2014
Missing Endangered Person in Superior
 
 
UPDATE------ Passang Dorjee has been located!

BOULDER COUNTY- The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is seeking assistance in locating Passang Dorjee.  Passang is a 71 year old Tibetan man who suffers from dementia.  Passang does not speak English and will not approach others, even when spoken to.  He wandered away from his home, 108 Mohawk Circle, Superior around 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, March 19, 2014.  He is described as an Asian male, 5’4” tall, 155 pounds with white hair, no facial hair.  He has wandered before and may walk long distances.  Please contact Boulder Communications a 303-441-4444 if you have any information, or see anyone matching Passang’s description. 


The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1457

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3973Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Unattended DeathUnattended Death

 

On Wednesday March 19th at approximately 1042 hours the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office along with Rocky Mountain Fire were dispatched to 1995 E. Coalton Road on report of a deceased female.  Upon arrival a 61 year old female was found deceased on the floor inside the residence.

The Boulder County Coroner is conducting an investigation along with Detectives from the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, to determine cause and manner of death.  At this time no foul play is suspected.

The name of the deceased is being withheld until the next of kin is notified, and will be released by the Coroner’s Office.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number is 14-1448

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3972Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Unattended DeathOn Wednesday March 19th at approximately 0930 hours the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office along with Rocky Mountain Fire were dispatched to the 1000 block of Westview Drive on report of an unresponsive female.  Upon arrival a 65 year old female was found deceased inside the home. 

The Boulder County Coroner’s Office is conducting an investigation along with Detectives from the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, to determine cause and manner of death.  At this time no foul play is suspected.

The name of the deceased is being withheld until next of kin is notified, and will be released by the Coroner’s Office.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1442

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3971Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Status of Sunset St. (Longmont) Bridge Replacement City of Longmont                                        Boulder County
Civic Center Complex                                 Boulder County Courthouse        
350 Kimbark St.                                           1325 Pearl St.
Longmont, CO  80501                                 Boulder, CO 80302

CONTACT: Rigo Leal, Longmont Public Information Officer, 303-651-8840
                   Barb Halpin, Boulder County Public Information Officer, 303-441-1622               

Longmont, Colo. – The City of Longmont and Boulder County are joining forces to plan the replacement of the Sunset Street Bridge that was damaged during the September 2013 flood.

The bridge, located on Sunset St. between 3rd Avenue and Boston Avenue in Longmont, is owned by Boulder County but due to its location serves primarily city residents and businesses as an important north-south connection over the St. Vrain Creek.

The two government agencies have agreed to work together on this project through an intergovernmental agreement (IGA), signed in October 2013. The agreement stipulates that Boulder County will take the lead on funding the project and the City of Longmont will manage the design and construction.

Sunset Street is classified as a federal-aid roadway, meaning that funding for flood repairs will come from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and not from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Boulder County is working with the FHWA to secure federal “Emergency Relief” funds for the bridge replacement, which would fund up to 82% of the estimated $2 to $3 million replacement cost. Boulder County and the City of Longmont have agreed to share the cost of any funds not provided by FHWA.

“The City and the County are very intertwined at this location,” says Boulder County Transportation Director George Gerstle, “and we welcome this partnership to replace the washed out structure with a more complete facility that will serve cars, bikes and pedestrians for many decades to come.” 

This section of Sunset Street remains in the unincorporated County along with several of the properties on the corridor. But the city owns many of the properties north of the bridge along with the St. Vrain Greenway bike trail that runs underneath the bridge.

City and County leaders determined that temporary repairs to make the bridge passable are impractical for two reasons. First, temporary repairs could not guarantee safe passage over the bridge and second, temporary repairs would cost approximately $350,000. In the interest of public safety and fiscal responsibility, both agencies agreed that resources should be focused on a permanent solution.

“In our estimation, the bridge is damaged beyond repair,” Longmont Public Works Director, Dale Rademacher, said. “It does not make sense to apply a temporary fix. The bridge has to be torn out and replaced.”

According to Boulder County Planner Tim Swope, the normal timeframe for designing and constructing a bridge like this would normally take three to four years. “We are condensing that timeframe by half,” he said. “We’re hoping to have a new bridge up and running sometime in 2015.”

The Sunset Street Bridge was built in 1958 and was already at the end of its expected life span. Discussions were under way for bridge replacement before the flood hit Longmont last year. The flood damage has expedited those discussions.

Before a new bridge can be built, various regulatory conditions must be met.

“Many people are understandably concerned about the lack of repair activity on the bridge,” Longmont City Manager, Harold Dominguez, said, “but there are many moving parts that have to be finalized before we can begin design and construction.” The County and City are working closely together to follow all federal regulations and ensure funding for the project. As necessary funding is secured, work can begin.

“The discussions with FHWA are on-going” says Swope, “FHWA wants to ensure that the federal dollars are well spent and we want to make sure that the finished product is worth the wait.”

In addition to funding, another complicating factor is that the new bridge needs to be designed to withstand the 100-year flood flow. This requires building a bridge that is significantly larger than the old one to mitigate flood impacts and prevent a similar catastrophe from occurring in the future. Beyond new design and engineering work, the improved bridge will also require private property land acquisition before construction can begin.

“We ask the public for patience as we complete this multi-phased process,” Dominguez added. “Smart planning and investment now will positively serve the community for decades to come.”

In addition to withstanding higher flow volumes, the improved Sunset Street Bridge will also provide greater vehicle capacity as well as the addition of bicycle lanes and sidewalks.


 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3969Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Land Conservation and Volunteer Awards to be Presented April 9Please join us for the
2014 Land Conservation Awards

Parks and Open Space 
5201 St. Vrain Road
Longmont, CO 80503

April 9, 2014, 3:00 p.m.

Parks and Open Space Director Ron Stewart and the Boulder County Commissioners will honor local individuals and organizations that have made outstanding contributions to environmental stewardship, historic preservation, volunteering, and conservation of land resources.
 
The commissioners will present the following awards:

Land Conservation Award to Rich Koopmann, for outstanding achievement in land preservation and stewardship during 35 years as a land planner, staff mentor, and persistent champion of Boulder County’s open space program, preserving the unique qualities and functions of rural land along with the county’s rich natural and cultural heritage. 

David Hallock will receive the award for Environmental Stewardship for outstanding achievement in environmental stewardship exemplified by his essential and pivotal role in the update of the Environmental Resource Element (ERE) of the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan.

Lexi Spencer Armitage will receive the Heritage Award for her commitment to historic preservation through her vision of saving the historic Cardinal town site and her decade-long perseverance to rehabilitating its collection of mining related buildings for a viable current use.

Partnership Award to Level 3 Communications for outstanding achievement as an Alpine Partner in the Partnership Initiative Program through the consistent participation in volunteer projects at Heil Valley Ranch and other open space properties.  Their willingness to organize several projects with adept and hardworking volunteers after last year’s flood event was an immense benefit to POS and the county overall. 

The two volunteer awards will be presented to DeAnna Cassidy, an outstanding active leader in the Boulder County 4-H Program for 18 years, and Art Roberts, a longtime volunteer for Boulder County Parks and Open Space Citizen Ranger program.

For more information contact Vivienne Jannatpour at 303-678-6277 or vjannatpour@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3968Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Deadline for teens to apply for summer jobs with Boulder County Youth Corps is March 28Adults may apply for team leader and assistant team leader positions until they are filled

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County residents ages 14-17 have until 4:30 p.m. on March 28 to apply for summer jobs with the Boulder County Youth Corps. The program is also hiring adults to be leaders and is especially in need of female applicants.

The Youth Corps will hire 150 teenagers to work 30 hours per week, Monday through Thursday, from June 16 to August 6 on a variety of community service projects such as forest thinning, historic preservation, construction and repair of fencing, trail construction and maintenance, landscaping and removal of Russian olive trees and noxious weeds. Youth Corps teams will work in unincorporated Boulder County as well as in cities and towns within Boulder County.

Applicants can apply online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps. Applications can also be picked up at counseling offices in Boulder Valley and St. Vrain Valley schools; city and town personnel offices; most local recreation and youth centers and libraries; and the Boulder County Human Resources Department, 2025 14th St., Boulder.  

This year, Corps members will earn a starting wage of $8.00/hour, with the possibility of earning a $100 bonus at the end of the program based on merit and strong attendance. Teens who have worked for the Corps in past years can earn up to $8.50/hour. In addition, Corps members are eligible for reimbursement for the purchase of work boots and gloves and RTD bus passes.  

The Youth Corps offers one of the best first-job opportunities available in Boulder County. Teams have completed projects such as resurfacing one-half mile of the Cradleboard Trail at Rock Creek Open Space, checking/replacing almost 4,000 light bulbs with LEDs, painting almost 200 residential light pedestals, as well as bike trail construction and maintenance at Valmont City Park. 

The Youth Corps is also hiring leaders to supervise the youth. Team leaders must be high school graduates at least 21 years old with two years of college coursework or more, and assistant team leaders must be high school graduates at least 18 years old. A list of full qualifications is available online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps. Team leaders start at $13.50/hour and assistant team leaders at $11.50/hour. These positions remain open until filled.

For more information, visit www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps or call the Youth Corps office at 303-678-6104. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3967Wed, 19 Mar 2014 10:00:00
41-year old male found dead in his apartmentUnattended Death

BOULDER COUNTY-  On Thursday, March 13, 2014 at approximately 12:00 pm, the Boulder County Communications Center received a call from an employer, who was asking that we check on one of their employees.  The man had not been heard from since Friday, March 7, 2014.

When Deputies from the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office and members of the Boulder Rural Fire arrived, they found the person, a 41 year-old male to be deceased inside his apartment.

The Boulder County Coroner’s Office is conducting an investigation along with Detectives from the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, to determine the cause and manner of death. At this time there is no foul play suspected.

The name of the deceased is being withheld until next of kin is notified, and will be released by the Coroner’s Office. 

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1338

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3965Thu, 13 Mar 2014 10:00:00
"Purge Your Spurge" events April 26 and May 10Boulder County - Do you have Myrtle Spurge in your yard? Boulder County Parks and Open Space and local agencies will be hosting two Purge Your Spurge events April 26 and May 10. Residents are encouraged to bring in bags of myrtle spurge and receive free native plants in exchange.

Myrtle Spurge
What: Purge Your Spurge Longmont
When: April 26, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Who: Boulder County Parks and Open Space and the City of Longmont
Where: Boulder County Fairgrounds, 9595 Nelson Rd., Longmont, CO 80501 .

What: Purge Your Spurge Boulder
When: May 10, 9 am to noon
Who: Boulder County Parks and Open Space and the City of Boulder at
Where: 6400 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, CO

Myrtle spurge, or Euphorbia myrsinites, is a “List A” noxious weed, and the Colorado Noxious Weed Act (C.R.S. 35-5.5-101-119) requires its eradication. Hand pulling and digging are the most effective methods used to control this plant. Myrtle spurge contains a toxic, milky sap which can cause severe skin irritations, including blistering. This plant is poisonous if ingested, causing nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Wearing gloves, long sleeves, shoes, and eye protection is highly recommended when in contact with myrtle spurge, as all plant parts are considered poisonous.

This noxious weed, also known as donkeytail spurge or creeping spurge, is a low-growing perennial with trailing fleshy stems. It spreads rapidly to surrounding areas and can “jump the fence” to natural areas to displace native vegetation and reduce forage for wildlife. The leaves are fleshy, blue-green and alternate. The flowers appear from March to May and are bright yellow-green with petal-like bracts. Myrtle spurge is commonly found in Denver, Boulder, Golden and the surrounding lands and has become a serious problem in the foothills and mountain ecosystems.

For more information, please contact Kurt Roy, Boulder County Parks and Open Space Weed Specialist, at kroy@bouldercounty.org, or 303-678-6294.


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3964Thu, 13 Mar 2014 10:00:00
New Bus-then-Bike Shelter Opening at Table Mesa Park-n-Ride March 14Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is proud to announce the opening of the third Bus-then-Bike shelter at the Table Mesa Park-n-Ride in South Boulder on Friday, March 14. The Table Mesa Bus-then-Bike shelter has capacity for 31 bicycles, which will add to the existing 36 bicycle lockers and 34 bicycle parking spaces at the Table Mesa Park-n-Ride. 

What: Table Mesa Bus-then-Bike Shelter Opening Events
Details: Staff will be at the shelter to answer questions and demonstrate how the shelter works. Free food and drink will be provided.
When: Monday, March 17 from 4-6 p.m. and Tuesday, March 18 from 7-9 a.m.
Where: The Table Mesa Bus-then-Bike shelter is located at the southeast corner of Table Mesa Dr. and U.S. 36, where Boulder-bound regional buses arrive from U.S. 36.  

Along with the two existing shelters at 8th & Coffman in Longmont, and 28th and Iris in North Boulder, the Table Mesa Bus-then-Bike shelter provides long-term, secure and weather-protected bicycle storage for commuters who combine a bus trip with a bike trip. 

Commuters using a bicycle for the “final mile” of their commute can feel confident leaving their bike in a shelter overnight, thus ending the need to load a bike on and off the bus each day. Commuters can also use a bicycle for the “first mile” of their commute, and leave their bicycle in the shelter during the day if they don’t need it at their final destination. These shelters increase access to transit and decrease time delays associated with loading and unloading bikes on buses. 

Bus-then-Bike shelters are free to use; to fill out an application and receive an access card to the shelters, or to view a site map of the shelter locations, please visit www.busthenbike.com.  

For more information about the Bus-then-Bike shelters, contact Alex Hyde-Wright, at ahyde-wright@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-4910.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3963Wed, 12 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Suspect in Lyons Pharmacy Robbery Arrested On March 10, 2014, at approximately 2:25 p.m. the suspect in this Robbery, 35-year-old Abigail Jo Johnson, was booked into the Boulder County Jail and charged in relation to two robberies at the St. Vrain Pharmacy in Lyons, CO. Abigail had previously been contacted by the Sheriff's Office in relation to this event, but was not arrested in light of a medical issue that needed to be tended to prior to moving forward with formal charges.
Information previously released:
 
At approximately 7:50 p.m. on March 3, 2014, the Boulder County Sheriff's Office received a call from Weld County Communications indicating Johnstown Police was in contact with the suspect from the pharmacy robbery that occurred in Lyons, CO earlier in the day. A neighbor of the suspect saw the article and surveillance photographs of the suspect on the internet, contacted her and convinced her to turn herself in to authorities.
Abigail Jo Johnson
Abigail Jo Johnson

 

Abigail Jo Johnson DOB 021979, was charged with:

 

2 counts Aggravated Robbery of a controlled substance from pharmacy C2F

2 counts Aggravated Robbery of an at risk adult C3F

2 counts Felony Menacing (simulated weapon) C5F

2 counts Theft of an at risk adult $500 or more C3F

2 counts of Child Abuse C1M – she had her 9 month old in the car with her and there was a child in the pharmacy during the robbery.

 

The gun used in the robbery has not been recovered.  Pictures of the suspect will be released as soon as that release will not hinder the investigation.  We thank the media for assisting in the speedy resolution of this incident by releasing information to the public!

 

BOULDER COUNTY- At approximately 1050 this morning Boulder County Communications Received a 911 call originating from the St. Vrain Pharmacy, 440 Main Street, Lyons, CO.  The caller reported that the pharmacy had just been robbed. 

The suspect was described as a white female in her 30’s with shoulder length blond hair wearing a tan straw hat.  She was armed with a “large” handgun.  She left in a dark blue pickup with a camper shell.  The vehicle was believed to have gone up Hwy 7 toward Allenspark. 

The schools in the Lyons area were placed on lockout from approximately 1055-1120 in Lyons and 1055-1125 in Allenspark.    

Boulder County Sheriff’s Office associated case number 14-1149.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3962Tue, 11 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Arson at HWY 287 and DawsonOn Friday, March 7, 2014 at 1:55 am Boulder County Sheriff’s Deputies and Mountain View Fire Protection District personnel were dispatched to N. 107th Street and Dawson Dr on the report of debris on Fire. Upon arriving a large debris pile of wood and branches from a clean-up site from the recent floods was on fire. Members of the Mountain View Fire Protection District extinguished the fire and deputies found a 1 gallon jug with an odor of gasoline on the debris pile.

 

Anyone that was in the area between midnight and 1:55 am and saw any vehicles or persons in that area is asked to call the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office at 303-441-4444.

 
The case number for this incident is 14-1210. 
 

This media release is available online at www.bouldersheriff.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3959Fri, 07 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Scholarship Funds Available for Multicultural StudentsBoulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Community Action Programs (CAP) has scholarship monies to award to low-income students. Scholarships range from $500-$1,000 each and are made possible through proceeds from CAP’s Annual Multicultural Awards Banquet. 

Applicants must meet the following criteria: 
  • Minimum one-year residency in Boulder County
  • Currently attending university, community college or technical school as a full-time undergraduate or graduate student
  • Low- to moderate-income level
Preference is given to students actively involved in a student organization or the community. This is not a scholarship for students who will be graduating from high school this spring/summer.

This is a one-time scholarship; prior CAP multicultural scholarship recipients are not eligible to apply again.

Applications are available online, at www.BoulderCountyCAP.org.

Application deadline is April 11. Students of color are encouraged to apply. Online applications and any questions can be sent to Sheila Goetz, at sgoetz@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3958Mon, 03 Mar 2014 10:00:00
Pharmacy Robbery in Lyons 

MEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup

Commander
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Monday, March 03, 2014

Pharmacy Robbery

BOULDER COUNTY- At approximately 1050 this morning Boulder County Communications Received a 911 call originating from the St. Vrain Pharmacy, 440 Main Street, Lyons, CO.  The caller reported that the pharmacy had just been robbed. 

The suspect was described as a white female in her 30’s with shoulder length blond hair wearing a tan straw hat.  She was armed with a “large” handgun.  She left in a dark blue pickup with a camper shell.  The vehicle was believed to have gone up Hwy 7 toward Allenspark. 

The schools in the Lyons area were placed on lockout from approximately 1055-1120 in Lyons and 1055-1125 in Allenspark.    


Female Suspect in Armed Robbery


Bag Carried by Suspect


This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3957Mon, 03 Mar 2014 10:00:00
"Is Organic an Option for Me?" Workshop April 5 in Boulder

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3956Fri, 28 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Cycling restrictions in Lefthand Canyon will be lifted beginning Feb. 28Construction is not yet complete, extra caution is advised 

Boulder County, Colo. – Weekday cycling restrictions in Lefthand Canyon from U.S. 36 to Lee Hill Road will be lifted Feb. 28. The stretch of road was closed to cyclists Monday through Saturday for the last four weeks while construction crews transported large materials into the canyon for flood repairs.
 
Most of the heavy hauling operation in Lefthand Canyon has concluded, but construction can be expected for several more weeks in an effort to complete a winter road in James Canyon and Balarat. James Canyon remains restricted to local access only until construction is complete. Cyclists are urged to be aware of construction traffic and other maintenance activities in the area. 

Boulder County Transportation would like to thank both cyclists and motorists for their continued patience while we repair the roads as quickly as possible. 

We want to remind all residents that while we are making progress on repairing the roads, we still have more to do (please refer to www.BoulderCountyFlood.org for updates). 

For more information about flood repairs, call the Transportation Department at 303-441-3900. For information about alternative cycling routes during road reconstruction, please contact Hannah Polow, at hpolow@bouldercounty.org or 720-564-2864.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3955Thu, 27 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Restoration of Lower Boulder Creek moving forwardThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Omaha District recently announced they have secured the necessary funds to complete the design and implementation of a long-anticipated stream restoration project along Boulder Creek.

The Lower Boulder Creek Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project is a joint endeavor of the Corps of Engineers and Boulder County Parks and Open Space.  The project involves the ecological restoration of an approximately one-mile degraded stretch of Boulder Creek on the county’s Alexander Dawson property, located between N 109th Street and Kenosha Road (map 756 KB).  The natural stream design will have alternating meanders, in-stream habitat enhancements, and a broad floodplain that will support native riparian habitat.

Parks and Open Space Director Ron Stewart said “We are very pleased that the project is moving forward and very much appreciate the excellent work of the staff of the Corps.  This project will allow a significant environmental enhancement of the area.”

During past mining within the project area, the creek was channelized, earthen levees were constructed along its banks, and the uplands were filled with unconsolidated post-mining soils. “This left the channel disconnected from its historic floodplain and created a highly degraded environment, which without active ecological restoration would take decades or more to improve,” said Ernst Strenge, Parks & Open Space resource planner. “The project will provide a good example of what natural stream restoration can look like along the Front Range and will help to improve the overall health of the creek’s ecosystem.”

The Corps anticipates that the design will be completed by September of this year and that construction could start as early as the end of the year.  Once started, construction of the project will take approximately one year to complete.

For more information about the project, go to the Lower Boulder Creek Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project web page or contact Ernst Strenge, Resource Planner, 303-678-6269, or estrenge@bouldercounty.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3954Thu, 27 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Residents Invited to Spring Runoff & Community Preparedness Meetings – March 10-13Boulder County, Colo. – In an effort to inform residents about the risks associated with the upcoming post-flood spring runoff, Boulder County is hosting Spring Runoff & Community Preparedness Meetings. 

These meetings will include information about potential spring runoff and summer flooding hazards, emergency preparedness measures, and updates about recovery projects such as the Comprehensive Creek Planning Initiative, FEMA buyout program, CDBG-DR funding, flood insurance, and housing assistance. Additionally the county will present an assessment of hazardous conditions and possible mitigation strategies such as debris removal, creek bank stabilization and channel restoration. The Long-Term Flood Recovery Group of Boulder County will also be in attendance to provide information about resources to meet individual unmet needs.  

Who: Lyons/North & South St. Vrain/Apple Valley/Longmont Dam Road/Little Thompson/Raymond & Riverside/Big Elk Meadows
When: March 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Where: Lifebridge Christian Church, 10345 Ute Hwy, Longmont
Who: Fourmile Canyon Dr./Gold Run/Fourmile Canyon & Twomile Canyon Creeks/Wagonwheel/Lee Hill/Bow Mountain/Pinebrook/Linden
When: March 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Where: First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder

Who: Jamestown/Lefthand Canyon/James Canyon/Streamcrest/Brigadoon/Oriole Estates/Nimbus Road
When: March 12, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Where: First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder

Who: South Boulder Creek/Boulder Creek/Coal Creek
When: March 13, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Where: First United Methodist Church, 1421 Spruce St., Boulder

Residents may attend any meeting, even if it is not the community where they live, but there will be some community-specific information given. 

Meetings will feature a presentation with information about county recovery efforts. Staff information tables will be set up in order to help answer specific questions or connect residents to the right team for a follow-up discussion. Resource guides, preparedness guides and literature for other recovery, rebuilding or preparedness programs will be provided.

For more information, contact Katie Arrington at karrington@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-1609 or visit www.BoulderCountyFlood.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3953Wed, 26 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Motorhome FireBOULDER COUNTY- At approximately 5:25 p.m. on Monday, February 24, 2014, Boulder County Communications received the call of a fully engulfed motorhome in the 500 block of Taylor Road, Allenspark.  The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, Allenspark Volunteer Fire Department and Estes Park Ambulance responded.   William Castronova started the motorhome to show it to a potential buyer, unfortunately the thirty-four foot motorhome was a total loss.  Nothing suspicious was found during the investigation and it is believed the fire started as a result of rodent nests or damage, as the motorhome had not been started over the past 2-years.  No other property was damaged in the fire.      

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1029. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3952Tue, 25 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Rescue between the second and third FlatironBOULDER COUNTY- At approximately 4:10 p.m. Boulder County Communications received a call from the City of Boulder in regards to an injured hiker in the area of the Flatirons.  Gun Han, a 20-year old Boulder resident, had been hiking off of the trail and climbing bolders between the first and second Flatiron when he dislocated his shoulder.  The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, Rocky Mountain Rescue Group and Boulder Fire Department, and Boulder Mountain Parks and Open Space responded and assisted to evacuate Mr. Han.  He was able to reset his shoulder and did not require further medical attention.     


The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-1027. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3951Tue, 25 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Irrigation ditch burning currently underway on county open space lands.Boulder County Parks and Open Space staff will conduct irrigation ditch burns on county open space lands this spring.
Agricultural ditch burns will occur between now and the end of the year as conditions allow.  

Open space properties tentatively scheduled for ditch burns this year include:
  • Pella Crossing
  • Josephine Roche Open Space
  • Kenosha Ponds
  • Swede Lateral and Lake at AHI property
  • Western Mobile Open Space
  • Ertl Open Space
  • Wamsgass
  • Big Gaynor Lake
These controlled burns are contingent on ideal weather conditions, including relative humidity, fuel moisture and wind. The department will work cooperatively with the Boulder County Sheriff's Department on each controlled burn following the Boulder County Guide to Prescribed Fire Planning and Operations.  

Smoke and flames may be visible for up to 72 hours. There may be heavy smoke in the air. Please do not call 9-1-1 since a controlled burn is not an emergency. Boulder County Parks and Open Space employees will monitor the burned areas to ensure fires are completely out.  

Agricultural ditch burning is a historic practice in Boulder County. It is an inexpensive, efficient and relatively fast “low-tech” method to target long sections of ditch and remove accumulated debris that can interfere with the flow of water. The primary advantage of burning ditches is that much of this material is consumed on-site. 

For additional information, contact Senior Forester Chad Julian at 303-579-8419 or cjulian@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3950Thu, 27 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Community-wide Eco Pass study results releasedCounty- and city-led study outlines scenarios and pricing for county-wide bus pass   

Boulder County, Colo. – After more than six months of work, Boulder County and the City of Boulder are excited to release the results of the Community-wide Eco Pass Feasibility Study. The study is available for review at www.BoulderCounty.org/Transportation and Study Result FAQs are available at www.BoulderTMP.net.
For decades the city and county have used Eco Pass programs to reduce vehicle trips and increase personal mobility in the community. Recently, several community-based Eco Pass programs have been successful at increasing the number of residents that have an Eco Pass.

In summer of 2013 the city and county, working closely with RTD, embarked on a Community-wide Eco Pass Feasibility Study to evaluate the costs and benefits to expand these programs. Six implementation scenarios were developed covering various user and geographic groups. For each scenario, the study estimated the increased transit ridership, total program costs, community benefits and implementation challenges. 

“The Eco Pass is one of the most cost-effective tools we’ve found to increase transit ridership.” said George Gerstle, Boulder County Transportation Director.  “Although challenges still exist, this study is a great foundation for continuing the conversation how to expand these programs.”

Using national and international research on fare elasticity, the study estimated that overall ridership would increase between 22 and 64 percent depending upon scenario. Additional research conducted (specifically within Boulder County) indicates that the increase in demand may be much more significant. Recent RTD research indicates that Boulder County residents with a Business Eco Pass are three times more likely to be a ‘frequent rider’ than residents that pay cash. In addition, surveys conducted to facilitate the Neighborhood Eco Pass program indicate that ridership may double or triple on a per household basis as the result of a County-wide Eco Pass program implementation.  

One of the most interesting findings is that a majority of the money needed to fund a community-wide Eco Pass is already being paid to RTD in the form of farebox revenue. The study suggests that these existing payments to RTD from all sources make up between 85 and 94 percent of the total costs of the program, depending upon scenario and financial assumptions. These payments are in the form of cash fares, 10-book rides, monthly passes and Eco Pass contracts. The additional costs beyond what RTD is being paid today would be used to buy-up (or increase) additional transit service on routes that would otherwise experience overcrowding due to a community-wide pass. A Communitywide Eco Pass would also require a formal agreement with RTD stating that any additional operating and capital costs would be covered by participating jurisdictions. 

Tracy Winfree, Director of Transportation for Public Works for the City of Boulder, is excited about the timing of the results. “The feasibility study will certainly help inform the city’s update to the community’s Transportation Master Plan,” Winfree said. “As the city and consultants analyze future transit scenarios, options that support a community-wide Eco Pass program will be explored.”

While the study does provide information about total costs and expected increased ridership, there is still much work that would need to be done before moving to next steps. During the process, RTD expressed concerns about the impact such a large-scale pass program may have on overcrowding as well as the need for an agreement to ensure all additional operating and capital costs are covered by participating jurisdictions. In addition, it is unclear if RTD bus garage capacity is needed to accommodate the additional service. Over the next several months, county and city staff will continue to work with RTD to better understand challenges and opportunities.

For more information about the Transportation Master Plan, visit www.BoulderTMP.net.

For more information about Boulder County Transportation programs, visit www.BoulderCounty.org/transportation.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3949Tue, 25 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Flood Threat Analysis Report - Feb. 25 Public Meeting
The Boulder County Sheriff and Office of Emergency Management will present a Threat Assessment concerning current risks and ongoing risks caused by the flooding of 2013. The report will include recommended mitigation efforts that need to occur prior to spring run off.

Changes to stream beds, remaining debris issues, and the potential of rock and mud slides all pose potential hazards this spring.

Public Meeting 
Tuesday, Feb. 25 - 3:30 p.m.
Commissioners' Hearing Room, Downtown Courthouse, 3rd Floor, 1325 Pearl St., Boulder

Meeting will be webstreamed

Event Details

Public invited, but no public input will be taken. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3948Mon, 24 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Presentation on Updated Flood Threat Analysis - Feb. 25The Threat Assessment concerns current risks and ongoing risks caused by the flooding of 2013, and recommended mitigation efforts that need to occur prior to spring run off. 

Changes to stream beds, remaining debris issues, and the potential of rock and mud slides all pose potential hazards this spring. 

3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25
Commissioners' Hearing Room
3rd Floor, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

Meeting details

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3947Mon, 24 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Community meeting to discuss future plans for Health and Human Services Complex in Longmont - March 12Residents and members of the public are invited to attend a brief presentation and Q&A session on the future of the building sites at 529 and 515 Coffman Street

 

Longmont, Colo. – Boulder County will host a community meeting on March 12 to allow neighbors, residents, businesses and other interested parties to get a glimpse of the design and future construction plans for the St. Vrain Health and Human Services Complex at 529 Coffman Street in Longmont.

Staff will be on-hand to provide information on the design of the new building as well as proposed construction timelines. The meeting will also address the deconstruction of the single-story structures at 515 and 529 Coffman Street, the former Sindelier and Ideal Market buildings, as well as the former site of the Longmont Christian Academy, located across the street at 550 Coffman, which the county purchased in 2013 as part of the redevelopment project.

 

Before the county begins construction on the St. Vrain campus, members of the public are invited to meet with staff, ask questions, offer ideas, and learn more about the future plans for the campus on the 500-block of Coffman Street in Longmont.

 

What:      Community meeting to discuss design concepts and construction timelines for Boulder County’s Health and Human Services campus in Longmont

 

When:     Wednesday, March 12  5:30 – 7:30 p.m. (presentation at 6 p.m.)

 

Where:    St. Vrain Conference Room, 529 Coffman Street, Longmont (parking available behind building off Terry Street and 6th Ave.)

 

A human services space needs assessment conducted in 2011 identified current space deficits and the need to plan for growth in demand for services over the next 10 to 20 years. The study also indicated that greater efficiencies and improvements in service delivery could be achieved by consolidating and co-locating related services at two central campuses, one each in Boulder and Longmont.

 

When construction is completed in mid-2015, services on the Longmont campus will include public health, mental health, aging services, foster care and adoption, workforce training and development, housing counseling, and programs designed for adults and families.

 

For more information about the March 12 meeting, contact James Butler, project manager, at 303-441-4826.

 

-BoulderCounty.org-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3946Mon, 24 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Skunk found in Longmont tests positive for rabiesBoulder County, Colo. – A skunk that bit a horse on Feb. 14, near Terry Lake, north of Longmont, has tested positive for rabies. This is the first animal that has been reported as positive for rabies in Boulder County this year, and the third in the state. In 2013, 24 animals tested positive for rabies in Boulder County, including 9 skunks.

Rabies is an infectious viral disease that affects the nervous system and is always fatal unless it is treated before any symptoms appear.

“While bats are the most common animal source of rabies in Colorado, even more concerning is the increase in “terrestrial” rabies during the last few years,” said Lane Drager, Consumer Protection Program coordinator for Boulder County Public Health.

Terrestrial rabies, such as skunk rabies, is carried by animals that travel predominantly on the ground. In the last few years skunks have been a significant source of rabies throughout eastern Colorado, now including the Front Range. Other wild animals that may carry rabies include raccoons and foxes.

“Rabies in ground-dwelling animals increases the risk of rabies exposure to pets and livestock,” said Drager. “If you know of a person or domestic animal that has or may have had contact with wildlife, or if you see a wildlife that looks sick or is acting unusual, call your local animal control office.”

Human and animal health agencies are also urging residents to have their horses vaccinated against the disease and to make sure that their dogs’ and cats’ rabies vaccinations are up-to-date. Owners of livestock should discuss rabies vaccination with their veterinarians. Vaccinating dogs, cats, horses, and livestock against rabies is the most important and effective way to protect both animals and humans from contracting rabies.

Exposure to rabies is generally the result of a bite or scratch by an infected animal, and it is sometimes practically undetectable, such as a tiny puncture of the skin by a bat. Treatment for rabies exposure involves a series of vaccinations.

Public health officials recommend the following precautions to reduce the risk of exposure to rabies:

  • DO NOT handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly. Contact animal control to collect the animal.
  • Thoroughly wash any wound caused by an animal with soap and water, and seek medical attention immediately.
  • Keep vaccinations current for all dogs, cats, and ferrets.
  • Maintain control of pets by keeping cats and ferrets indoors and keeping dogs under direct supervision.
  • Teach children to leave wildlife alone.
  • Do not leave pet food or livestock feed in areas that are accessible to wildlife.
  • If a person or pet has been bitten by or has had contact with a bat or wild animal, seek medical care immediately, and then contact your local animal control agency or Boulder County Public Health to arrange for rabies testing.

For more information about rabies, visit www.BoulderCountyVector.org or call 303.441.1564.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3945Mon, 24 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Structure Fire

MEDIA RELEASE                                                      Friday February 22nd, 2014

 

 

TO:                  Boulder County Area Media

 

FROM:            Deputy Jeff Pelletier

 

RE:                  Structure Fire in Lyons

                        Case number 14-986

 

 

BOULDER COUNTY- On February 22, 2014 at 12:39am, Boulder County Communications received a report of a structure fire at 4168 Ute Highway in the Town of Lyons.  Upon arrival, high flames were visible at the back of the residence.  Boulder County Sheriff’s Deputies immediately notified the occupants of the residence, who were asleep about the fire and they were evacuated with no injuries.

 

Emergency crews from Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, Lyons Fire Protection District, Hygiene Fire Department, Pinewood Springs Fire Protection District, Lefthand Fire Protection District, American Medical Response and Longmont Emergency Unit responded to the scene.  The fire was extinguished and contained to the back deck area of the residence.

 

Lyons Fire Protection District is still investigating the cause of the fire.  No foul play is suspected at this time.

 

Deputy Jeff Pelletier

Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

5600 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder, Colorado 80301

(303) 441-3650

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3944Sat, 22 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Rescue

MEDIA RELEASE                                                        Friday February 21st, 2014

 

 

TO:                  Boulder County Area Media

 

FROM:            Deputy Asa Merriam

 

RE:                  Rescue of stranded climber on the 1st Flatiron

                        Case number 14-0973

 

 

Boulder County – On February 21st, 2014, at approximately 5:47 PM, the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office was called to respond to a stranded climber on the 1st Flatiron, just above Chautauqua Park, in Boulder.  The climber, a 22 year old male, had called dispatch via his cell phone.  He was climbing by himself and was unable to get off the mountain safely.

 

Emergency personnel from the Boulder County Sheriff's Office, Rocky Mountain Rescue, and Boulder Fire Department were dispatched to the scene.  Emergency personnel were able to reach the male around 7:15 p.m. and assist him off of the mountain.

The male climber sustained no serious injuries.

Deputy Asa Merriam

Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

5600 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder, Colorado 80301

(303) 441-3650

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3943Saturday, February 21, 2014
Commissioner Elise Jones Elected DRCOG Secretary Denver, Colo. – Boulder County Commissioner Elise Jones was elected secretary of the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Board of Directors at the Board’s Feb. 19 meeting. Jones has represented Boulder County on the DRCOG Board of Directors since January 2013. 

The full list of 2014 officers is as follows:
  • Douglas County Commissioner Jack Hilbert as chair
  • Lone Tree Council Member Jackie Millet as vice chair
  • Boulder County Commissioner Elise Jones as secretary
  • Cherry Hills Village Mayor Doug Tisdale as treasurer
“This slate of officers is well-equipped to lead the Board this year as it collaboratively addresses a number of important issues, not the least of which is the adoption of the Metro Vision 2040 plan,” said DRCOG Executive Director Jennifer Schaufele.

Additionally, the Board elected the following members to serve one-year terms on the DRCOG Administrative Committee. 
  • Boulder Council Member Suzanne Jones
  • Centennial Mayor Cathy Noon
  • Greenwood Village Mayor Ron Rakowsky
  • Longmont Council Member Gabe Santos
  • Northglenn Mayor Joyce Downing
The Administrative Committee, which oversees the regional council’s fiscal, contractual and personnel operations, is composed of DRCOG’s officers and representatives of each county and city in the region with populations exceeding 120,000. The remaining members are elected directly by the DRCOG Board. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3940Thu, 20 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Fire on Flagstaff Mountain 

MEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Flagstaff Mountain Fire

BOULDER COUNTY- On Tuesday, February 18, 2014, The Boulder Fire Department, Boulder Police Department, Boulder Sheriff’s Office and Rocky Mountain Fire Department responded to a fire at the base of Flagstaff Mountain.  The fire was quickly contained to approximately ½ acre and it was extinguished. 

Initially the fire was believed to be in the City of Boulder, but it was later determined to have started in the County.  Boulder County Emergency Services investigated the cause of the fire and determined it was started by residents in the area burning garden slash.  After completing the investigation they utilized the opportunity to educate the residents on fire safety and no charges will be filed. 

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-885

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org


# # #

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3939Wed, 19 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Final days for flood survivors to discuss unmet needs at walk-in centersVolunteers have interviewed nearly 300 residents in Boulder County so far

Boulder County, Colo. – A national disaster recovery group is in Boulder County to determine who in the community will not be able to rebuild and recover from the 2013 Flood without assistance. A team of World Renew volunteers are conducting one-on-one interviews with flood survivors through Feb. 22. This is the first step to accessing resources from the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group (LTFRG) which include access to case managers, financial assistance and construction resources. 

All information given at the walk-in centers is confidential and will assist designated case managers to help residents connect with available resources. The information will also help to develop a detailed estimate of the total cost for recovery in the community which helps the LTFRG as well as government agencies raise the necessary recovery funds and donations of building materials and supplies

South Boulder 
St. Paul's United Methodist Church - 4215 Grinnell Ave, Boulder
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Lyons
Walt Self Senior Center - 335 Railroad Ave, Building B, Lyons
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Longmont
First Lutheran Church - 803 3rd Avenue, Longmont
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 20, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

North Boulder 
Boulder Friends Meeting - 1825 Upland, Boulder
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Central Boulder County
Altona Grange - 9386 N 39th Street (at Nelson Road)
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 20, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Interview questions are straightforward and should not require residents to supply any paperwork, although if flood survivors do have a FEMA number, they are asked to bring that with them to the center. Spanish language interpreters will be onsite at the Longmont location every day and will be available at other sites during designated hours. Sites are also wheelchair accessible (with the exception of the Altona Grange site) and appointments can be made for any ASL requirements. 

For more information please contact the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group, at 303-895-3429 or floodrecovery@unitedwayfoothills.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3938Wed, 19 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County announces intent to acquire hazard mitigation funding for property ownersBoulder County, Colo. – As part of flood recovery efforts, Boulder County will apply for funds from FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP). Funds from the program will be used to acquire, elevate or structurally retrofit properties that were damaged in the 2013 Flood and are vulnerable to future disasters. 

Property acquisition, better known as buyouts, is the most well-known function of the HMGP program. In this portion of the program, funds are used to buy out properties damaged during flooding, demolish them, and turn the land into open space. Removal of these properties will prevent future losses occurring and will also give property owners an opportunity to recoup a large part of their investment in property that has lost some, if not most, of its value due to damage. 

Participation in the HMGP program is voluntary for all parties involved. Property owners who have sustained damage as a result of the 2013 Flood may be eligible to participate in the program.  The county is reaching out to those with substantial damage from the 2013 Flood through a mailing that will include a property owner handbook with details on the program. 

All interested property owners or those who have questions should contact the Boulder County HMGP Information Hotline at 866-953-2325 or email buyout@bouldercounty.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3937Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Adults needed for Boulder County Youth Corps team leadersBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Youth Corps is hiring adults to be team leaders. The positions are open until filled.

The Youth Corps will employ teenagers to work on a variety of community service projects and is looking for team leaders to train, supervise and evaluate the teens. Team leaders will be employed from June 4-Aug. 8 to work up to 40 hours per week, Monday through Friday. Projects will include activities such as forest thinning, historic preservation, construction and repair of fencing, trail construction and maintenance, landscaping and removal of Russian olive trees and noxious weeds. Youth Corps teams will work in unincorporated Boulder County as well as in cities and towns within Boulder County.

Applicants can view a full list of qualifications and apply online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps. Applications can also be picked up at the Boulder County Human Resources Department, 2025 14th St., Boulder.  

Team leaders must be high school graduates at least 21 years old with two years of college coursework or more, among other qualifications. Team leaders start at $13.50/hour. 

The Youth Corps offers one of the best first-job opportunities available for teens in Boulder County. Teams have completed projects such as resurfacing one-half mile of the Cradleboard Trail at Rock Creek Open Space, checking/replacing almost 4,000 light bulbs with LEDs and painting almost 200 residential light pedestals, and bike trail construction and maintenance at Valmont City Park.   

For more information, visit www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps or call the Youth Corps office at 303-678-6104. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3936Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Flood tours of County Open Spacehttp://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3935Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:00:00The Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education (CAEE) acknowledges Boulder County teen program with Award for Excellence in Environmental EducationThe Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education (CAEE) is recognizing exemplary and effective environmental education programs and individuals across Colorado who are setting a new standard for learning in their communities. Ten programs and 2 individuals are being acknowledged with an Award for Excellence in Environmental Education for their outstanding work in helping learners understand their role in the environment. The recipients of the 2013 Awards for Excellence in Environmental Education will be honored at an evening banquet hosted by CAEE on Friday, March 21, 2014, at the University of Denver.

The environmental education program award recipients for 2013 include Best New Program Award to Boulder County Parks and Open Space's Left Hand Outdoor Challenge.

The Left Hand Outdoor Challenge is an innovative program that aims to inspire Boulder County high school students to be stewards of our open space lands. Through demonstration and hands-on application of resource management techniques, participants are able to apply sound environmental stewardship practices to their daily lives, as well as inspiring future career choices. Innovative and enjoyable monthly challenges incorporate volunteer service, environmental education, and interactive group discussions focusing on relevant resource management issues and building appropriate skills.  Each challenge is hosted by Parks and Open Space staff from our various departments. For more information about the program and to apply, go to www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org/challenge. Applications for the fall 2014 season will be accepted after May 1. For photos of the past outings, go to www.Facebook.com/lefthandchallenge.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3934Thu, 13 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County seeks resident input for general election Voter Service and Polling Center locationsLocal voters requested to take online survey

Boulder County, Colo. – This fall will be the first general election carried out after the passage of last year’s Colorado Voter Access and Modernized Election Act. The law changes the Colorado election process to provide all mail ballot elections, same-day voter registration and resident access to Voter Service and Polling Centers.

The Boulder County Elections Division is conducting outreach to residents to ask local voters where they would like to access a Voter Service and Polling Center. The Elections Division will continue to utilize all Boulder County Clerk and Recorder offices for this service during the election, but we anticipate the outreach will garner new location ideas that may not have been previously considered. 

To capture resident input, we have designed an online survey. We will be collecting survey responses through Tuesday, Feb. 25:

What: Online resident input survey 

When: Available for input until Feb. 25

Who: Boulder County voters

Where: www.BoulderCountyVotes.org  or www.surveymonkey.com/s/BoulderCountyElectionsSurvey  

The Clerk & Recorder’s Office is also using this opportunity to seek ideas on ballot drop-off locations as well as input on whether residents would utilize 24-hour ballot drop-boxes prior to the election.

Voter Service and Polling Centers are places residents can drop off a mail ballot, cast a ballot in person, request a replacement ballot, register to vote or update registration information, or vote using equipment for persons with disabilities. Boulder County will have 13 Voter Service open throughout the county on Election Day with some locations opening up to two weeks early.

For additional information on elections in Boulder County, visit www.BoulderCountyVotes.org.

-BoulderCountyVotes.org-

-Twitter: @BoCoClerk-


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3933Thu, 13 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Trip Tracker Program Expands to Louisville, Lafayette and LongmontProgram encourages walking, biking, carpooling or busing to and from school

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County Transportation is leading an exciting partnership between Boulder Valley School District (BVSD) and St. Vrain Valley School District (SVVSD) to expand Trip Tracker to an additional 15 schools outside of the city of Boulder. This expansion is made possible with federal grant funding through the Congestion Mitigation Air Quality program, which is administered through the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) and the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG).

Trip Tracker encourages and rewards mostly elementary and middle school students (and now staff) to walk, bike, carpool, ride the school bus or the RTD bus to and from school. For every 4 trips students and staff take without driving alone or being dropped off as a single family, they earn one Trip Tracker Dollar that can be used like real cash at designated local businesses. The businesses are reimbursed at $0.50 for every Trip Tracker dollar they collect.

What: Students and staff at select schools within BVSD and SVVSD get rewarded for getting to school by bike, on foot, bus, carpool or other non-motorized transportation.
Who: Students and staff at the following schools: BCSIS, Blue Mountain, Boulder High, Centennial, Central, Community Montessori, Flatirons, Heatherwood, High Peaks, Horizons K-8, Louisville Elementary, Manhattan, Mesa, Monarch K-8, New Vista University Hill, Platt, Southern Hills, and Summit. Other schools within BVSD and SVVSD will be selected for the 2014-2015 school year.  
When: The grant portion of the Trip Tracker Expansion program will run from January 2014 through the 2014-2015 school year.
Details: Parents register their children and staff register themselves online.  Trips are reported monthly on an emailed survey and Trip Tracker rewards are given out mid-month in school cafeterias, classrooms and staff mailboxes. There are 40+ business locations accepting Trip Tracker Dollars with more being added to support the program in Louisville, Lafayette and Longmont.
How: Everyone receives monthly surveys to complete after they register:
Last year, with Trip Tracker in 11 schools, we recorded more than 75,000 car trips to school and more than 300,000 miles of driving. Although one third of the participants in the program reported no reduction in single-family car trips (they were walking, etc. already), the other 2/3 reported an average reduction in weekly car trips to school of 40 percent.

"Trip Tracker has motivated my 8th grader to take RTD home almost every day,” Diane Schwemm, a BVSD parent, said. “We're both pleased with his increased independence. My older son bikes to and from Boulder High regularly and loves having Trip Tracker money to spend at restaurants and coffee shops. Whenever the car stays in the garage, I'm happy!”

St. Vrain Valley School District’s Blue Mountain Elementary and Central Elementary principals are excited about bringing the program to their students and staff. James Hecocks, principal at Central Elementary said, "This is an excellent opportunity to build upon the robust walking and biking habits of our students and families of Central as well as introduce our new students to a fun way to promote wellness through daily exercise."

If you have a student at one of these schools, or are a staff member and want to participate, you can fill out a registration form online. Louisville Elementary, Mesa Elementary, Monarch K-8, Platt Middle and Southern Hills Middle joined 12 other Boulder schools already in Trip Tracker in the fall of 2013. 

“My children would never agree to the long bus ride from our home in North Boulder to their open enrollment school, University Hill, without Trip Tracker,” BVSD parent Kara Edmunds said.  “By riding the bus, they save me more than an hour in the car each day!”

For more information, to donate to the program or if you would your business to participate in this program, please visit www.bvsd.org/tracker or www.svvsdtriptracker.com
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3932Tue, 11 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Comprehensive Creek Planning Initiative Moves Forward Boulder County, Colo. - As a part of flood recovery, Boulder County launched a Comprehensive Creek Planning Initiative in November 2013 to address the post-flood condition of creeks in the county. The Comprehensive Creek Planning Initiative conducted a series of community outreach meetings, targeting Boulder County neighborhoods that experienced severe impacts from the flood. Since these meetings, which were attended by over 650 residents, Boulder County has consolidated the information collected at these meetings with other sources of information, and has begun forming plans for short- and long-term creek recovery. Summaries from the facilitated neighborhood discussions have been collected, organized and posted online.

Short – Term Emergency Mitigation 
For short term recovery, Boulder County is identifying site-specific conditions that need to be addressed so water flows that may come with spring run-off, or summer monsoon rains, do not create additional hazards. The information provided by residents at the community meetings has informed identification of these site-specific conditions. Once fully understood, Boulder County hopes to facilitate a process whereby different public agencies can partner with landowners to implement and fund the necessary emergency mitigation measures, including debris removal, creek bank stabilizations and creek channel capacity projects. Following is the timeline for short-term creek recovery activities:

December 2013 – January 2014
    • The Creek Planning project team consolidated resident-reported creek and other flood-related damages with information from other agencies, such as the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Boulder County Flood Rebuilding & Permit Information Center (FRPIC), U.S. Army Corps of Engineer (COE), and Boulder County Flood Debris Removal Team. 
    • The project team performed a digital analysis of the data to determine potential effects of creek-related hazards, e.g. debris in creek, creek bed elevation, bank erosion, channel changes, etc. and identify site conditions which may have a high impact on surrounding areas.

February – March 2014 
    • The project team is conducting in-the-field verification visits to identified sites. This will help determine whether a threat to creek flow and containment is a short-term imminent threat with increased creek flows or if the threat is a longer term concern.
    • As the field visits progress, the project team will develop a list of creek-related projects to be implemented over the spring and early summer. The list will target the areas of highest need first for implementation. 
As the county works with other agencies to finalize plans and investigate funding sources for emergency mitigation, more information will be available to residents about specific project locations, scopes and implementation schedule. 

Long – Term Creek Recovery
In conjunction with the short-term actions, the Creek Planning Project Team has begun a countywide Master Plan development process. Master Plans provide a road map for longer-term creek planning, restoration and recovery with goals that address flood hazard mitigation, water quality, riparian areas, terrestrial habitat, recreation and more. These plans will also help facilitate the restoration of public and private infrastructure throughout the county, such as culverts, bridges and roads that are located adjacent to or within creek channels. 

For some watersheds, such as St. Vrain Creek and Lefthand Creek, Boulder County will be the lead contracting agency, working with other jurisdictions and stakeholders to develop the Master Plans. For other areas, such as Boulder Creek, Rock Creek/Coal Creek and Little Thompson, Boulder County will be a participating agency with other agencies taking the lead.  

All of the master plans will be collaborative efforts among local communities, state and federal agencies, residents and other stakeholders who are interested in creek recovery. Provided that sufficient funding for master plan development is available, the master planning process will get underway in the spring and early summer of this year. 

For more information about the Comprehensive Creek Planning Initiative visit the webpage or email ccpteammailbox@bouldercounty.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3931Mon, 10 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Public hearings set for a review of disaster grant planColorado set to receive $62.8M in grant money for disaster recovery

Boulder County, Colo. – The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) allocated $62.8M dollars in Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR) to the State of Colorado to assist in a portion of flood disaster related costs. This grant is designed to assist with a small amount of those needs not being met through FEMA funds or other federal funds. To secure these HUD funds, the state must submit an action plan to HUD detailing a proposed allocation of these funds based on community priority.

The Governor’s Recovery Office is co-hosting four public hearings to review and discuss the CDBG-DR process and the state’s draft Action Plan. The Action Plan will be available online on Monday, Feb. 10. Citizens are encouraged to review the Action Plan and provide feedback and comments. Citizens wanting to provide public comment at the hearings will be required to sign up upon arrival, with speakers going in the order they sign in. Comments on the Action Plan will be accepted through Tuesday, Feb. 18.

What: Public Hearing concerning CDBG-DR process and Action Plan
When: Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7-9 p.m.
Where: Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, Houston Room, 1750 33rd St., Boulder
Details: Read the action plan and submit online comments

CDBG-DR funds will bring critical resources to help our communities continue to rebuild and recover following the 2013 Flood. However, these funds are extremely limited and will not address all of the unmet needs of our residents and local governments. It is important that residents comment on the state’s CDBG-DR Action Plan, or application, to ensure that the highest priorities are adequately and accurately captured in the Plan. Local governments such as Boulder County will manage the funds in each community as sub-grantees, directing resources to recovery priorities that also meet the program requirements of CDBG-DR. 

The communities of Boulder County are working together to prepare to implement these funds as strategically, efficiently and effectively as possible, so that we all rebuild more resiliently and better than before. 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3930Fri, 07 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Sheriff’s Office recruiting volunteers to provide assistance to victims of crime, traumaDeadline to apply is March 7, training begins April 1

Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is seeking volunteers to serve as victim advocates – individual to provide assistance to victims of crime, accidents, trauma and other critical events.

Working as a victim advocate offers the opportunity to touch the lives of others by providing a valuable source of support and information to those who have had their lives altered by traumatic events. 

Sheriff Joe Pelle said, “Our Victim Advocates provide direct and follow-up support to the victims of crime and tragedy in our communities. This is a much needed, much appreciated service. The opportunity for personal reward and growth for the advocate is rich as well. Please consider joining us. We need people with a caring heart and who are willing to listen to and support victims and their families.”  

If accepted into the training program, advocates attend 40 hours of training in crisis intervention, grief response, victimology, legal procedures, law enforcement and resource information. Ideal volunteers are calm, compassionate, emotionally mature and non-judgmental.

No prior experience is necessary as trainings will be provided. They will be held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and on Saturdays from April 1 through April 19. The deadline to apply is Friday, March 7.

“Being an advocate isn’t a role that suits everyone, but for those who want to help others in this way, it’s a privilege,” said Donna Foster, Director of the Victim Services Program.

For more details about the program, a volunteer description or an application, please visit www.bouldercounty.org/safety/victim/pages/vicprogram.aspx or contact Donna Foster at dfoster@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-3656 or Leigh Anne Sutton at lsutton@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-4737.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3929Thu, 06 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Residents invited to post-flood income tax workshop Feb. 12Boulder County, the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group and United Policyholders host this free workshop

Boulder County, Colo. – Residents whose homes were damaged or destroyed in the 2013 Flood, or local tax and personal finance professionals are encouraged to attend the workshop on Feb.12. Attendees will hear from disaster tax expert John Trapani, CPA.

The workshop will help residents navigate their income tax options following a major disaster: 


When: Wednesday, Feb 12, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
NEW LOCATION: First United Methodist Church of Boulder - 1421 Spruce St. (across from the courthouse)

The workshop will cover several topics including:
  • Income tax benefits and reporting responsibilities that can help and hurt people who experienced a disaster loss 
  • Major questions to be discussed:
    • Is there a loss or gain? What tax year should you claim a loss? Sell 7 buy or rebuild?
  • Documenting and claiming insured and uninsured losses
  • Tax consequences of insurance settlements SBA loans, FEMA grants, etc. 
  • Special rules for federally declared disasters
  • Determining your cost basis for damaged property
Attendees will have the chance to ask questions during a Q&A session.

For more information about the workshop, visit www.accountantfordisasterrecovery.com or call Kerri Oliver at kerrioliver@gmail.com
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3928Tue, 04 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Help is Available for Rising Gas Costs in Boulder CountyBoulder County, Colo. – Last week, Four Mile Canyon resident Jonna Augustine opened her propane gas bill and found the charge to fill her 500-gallon tank had nearly tripled to $1,700. She reached out to the Boulder County Department of Housing and Human Services (BCDHHS) for help and was able to get $700 in assistance to pay the bill through an expansion of the Low-income Energy Assistance (LEAP) program.

“I opened the bill and I think my eyes got as big as saucers,” Augustine says. “I called the gas company and said, ‘Was this a misprint? Did someone put too many digits in here?’ Without the help from the county there was no way I could have made it through this.”  

Recent gas shortages led to higher propane prices in parts of the U.S. in recent weeks. Natural gas prices have risen as well. BCDHHS oversees the LEAP program, which provides financial assistance to pay winter heating bills for those who qualify. BCDHHS expanded the program recently under an initiative called Heat Plus to cover more Boulder County residents, and has seen a doubling in emergency LEAP applications with the skyrocketing gas prices. Augustine’s was one of them.

“We’ve heard from people facing utility disconnects and people running low on their heating fuel, among other hardships,” said Theresa Kullen, LEAP Eligibility Specialist Manager for BCDHHS. “We review emergency applications immediately and process the same day when we can. We also work with utility companies to get holds on disconnects, and we’ve got great relationships with Boulder County’s two largest heat source providers.”

Augustine, who is also facing the stress of recovering from the recent flooding in Boulder County (the bridge to her home was destroyed) along with some recent medical problems, says it’s important for more people to know LEAP/Heat Plus is available to help reduce some of the pressures. “I’ve never needed so much help before this past year,” she adds, “and I know there are many others in the same boat.”    

Applicants must meet income criteria to qualify for LEAP, including income limits of 150% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). Boulder County’s expansion of the program extends help for those earning up to 185% FPL. 

Boulder County residents should contact the state of Colorado LEAP Information Line at 866-HEAT-HELP (866-432-8435) to apply for assistance. Residents can also get help at the Boulder County LEAP office at 1921 Corporate Center Circle, Suite 3-F, in Longmont, or call 303-678-6097.

“We don’t want to see anyone’s heat disconnected due to rising prices,” says Kullen. “Call us today, even if you’re not sure whether you qualify for the help.” 


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3927Mon, 03 Feb 2014 10:00:00
Commissioners appoint new Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District Advisory Committee

The citizen-led SPLIDAC will convene in February to begin making recommendations for prioritization of repaving projects under the LID

 

Boulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Commissioners have appointed the first members of the Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District Advisory Committee (SPLIDAC).

 

This citizen-led advisory board will serve as an independent committee to provide the Boulder County Commissioners and the Boulder County Transportation Department with recommendations regarding administration of the Subdivision Paving Local Improvement District (LID). The LID was finalized by the Board of County Commissioners in November 2013 with the anticipation of beginning road improvement projects in unincorporated county subdivisions in 2014.

 

Of the 23 applications received, the following seven committee members and three alternates were appointed:

 

Appointed

·         Kim Hedberg             Valle Del Rio (Small Subdivision, 2-year term)

·         Vince Hirsch               Boulder Heights (Mountain Area, 1-year term)

·         Peter King-Smith        Pine Brook Hills (Mountain Area, 3-year term)

·         Robert Loveman         Pine Brook Hills (Mountain Area, 2-year term)

·         Timm Morrison           Paul Nor Estates (Plains Area, 1-year term) RESIGNED (AS OF 2/25/14) - REPLACEMENT PENDING APPOINTMENT

·         Richard Piland            Overbrook (Plains Area, 3-year term)

·         Robert Schuetze           Gunbarrel Green (Plains Area, 2-year term)

 

Alternates – all 1-year terms

·         Richard Blanchette     Crestview Estates – Mountain Area Alternate

·         Jeff Wagener              Eldorado Springs – Small Subdivision  Alternate

·         Charles Wibby           South Meadow Gunbarrel Green – Plains Area Alternate

 

Terms will be held for one, two or three years in order to stagger appointments for the 15-year project. The County Commissioners based their appointment selections on a number of factors, including:

 

·         Geographical diversity (i.e., a cross representation of plains, mountains, mix of small and large subdivisions)

·         Knowledge, skills, expertise, and demonstrated ability to work with a wide set of issues and financial complexity in an advisory board capacity

·         Diversity of opinions and self-identified challenges and ideas put forward by the applicants in relation to communicating SPLIDAC recommendations to impacted residents

·         Availability to serve regularly on the SPLIDAC, and in particular, availability to make more frequent meeting dates for the first few months of the appointment

 

The first meeting will be scheduled in mid-February with more frequent meetings established in the first few months to get the new advisory committee members up-to-speed with matters related to budgets and the comparison of paving needs and priorities, and in order to make the most use of favorable road reconstruction conditions in 2014.

 

Three alternates, each assigned to a specific geographic region, were appointed to ensure that the different perspectives will be represented as decisions are made, should a particular member not be able to attend a meeting. In most cases, alternate members indicated during their interviews that they had travel schedules that would conflict with initial meeting dates in February and March, a critical timeframe for getting the advisory board up and running.

 

The alternates will have voting rights only when filling in for an appointed member.

 

The newly-appointed advisory committee represents many different opinions and ideas on how the LID should move forward, and the County Commissioners were extremely pleased with the caliber of applicants and the level of personal commitment demonstrated throughout the interview process.
 

All SPLIDAC meetings are open to the public and there will be opportunity for public comment. A calendar of meetings is posted at www.bouldercounty.org/subdivisionpaving.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3925Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Jedediah Lee Fox-Udall arrested for breaking into cars in Boulder County 

MEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Thursday, January 30, 2014

Arrest made on car break ins in Boulder County

BOULDER COUNTY- On Wednesday, January 29, 2014, at 12:15 p.m. Deputies of the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the 4700 block of Eldorado Springs Drive to the report of a male breaking into cars.  Prior to deputy’s arrival, City of Boulder Mountain Parks and Open Space Rangers contacted a male matching the description of the suspect. 

Residents in the area identified the male who had been contacted by the Rangers as the one they had seen breaking into vehicles in the area.  While searching the suspect deputies found drug paraphernalia, the suspect told deputies he had used heroin 48 hours prior to their contact with him.

The suspect was identified as 26 year old Jedediah Lee Fox-Udall, whose date of birth is June 1, 1987. 

Mr. Fox-Udall was charged with four counts of first degree criminal trespass, a felony, and possession of a schedule I drug, also a felony. 

Mr. Fox-Udall was released on a $1500 bond at 6:40 on January 29, 2014.  His next court appearance is February 20, 2014 at 2:00 p.m.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-477.

Jedediah Lee Fox-Udall
Jedediah Lee Fox-Udall

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3924Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:00:00
National Disaster Recovery Group Coming to Boulder County to Assess Flood-Related Community NeedsVolunteer interviewers will meet with flood survivors to help individuals connect with resources and gain a clear picture of what it will take to recover

Boulder County, Colo. – The Long-Term Flood Recovery Group of Boulder County (LTFRG) has requested the services of a national disaster recovery group to determine who in the community will not be able to rebuild and recover without assistance. A team of World Renew volunteers will conduct one-on-one interviews with flood survivors from Feb. 10-22.  This process will help to prioritize individual needs and connect survivors with the LTFRG which can provide long-term support during recovery with individual case management as well as financial and construction assistance for those most in need.

The LTFRG is organizing 5 walk-in locations across the county from February 10-22. Residents affected by the flood who require assistance for flood recovery are encouraged to visit a walk-in center to complete a short interview regarding flood losses and recovery needs. 

All information given at the walk-in centers is confidential and will assist designated case managers to help residents connect with available resources. The information will also help to develop a detailed estimate of the total cost for recovery in the community which helps the LTFRG as well as government agencies raise the necessary recovery funds and donations of building materials and supplies

Interview questions are straightforward and should not require residents to supply any paperwork, although if flood survivors do have a FEMA number, they are asked to bring that with them to the center. Spanish language interpreters will be onsite at the Longmont location every day and will be available at other sites during designated hours. Sites are also wheelchair accessible (with the exception of the Altona Grange site) and appointments can be made for any ASL requirements. 

South Boulder 
St. Paul's United Methodist Church - 4215 Grinnell Ave, Boulder
Monday, Feb. 10, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 13, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 17, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Lyons
Walt Self Senior Center - 335 Railroad Ave, Building B, Lyons
Monday, Feb. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 15, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 17, 10 a.m. -5 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Longmont
First Lutheran Church - 803 3rd Avenue, Longmont
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 13, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 15, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 20, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

North Boulder 
Boulder Friends Meeting - 1825 Upland, Boulder
Monday, Feb. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 11, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 17, 10 a.m-5 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Central Boulder County
Altona Grange - 9386 N 39th Street (at Nelson Road)
Thursday, Feb. 13, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 15, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 20, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

For more information please contact the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group, at 303-895-3429 or floodrecovery@unitedwayfoothills.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3923Tue, 28 Jan 2014 10:00:00
2014 Parks & Open Space Seasonal Jobs to Open SoonThe Boulder County Parks and Open Space Department is looking for temporary employees this year. Seasonal employment is often an important step in securing a full-time job in public land management. 

Applications and resumes will only be accepted after the Human Resources Department has officially listed a job. Applications submitted prior to the opening will be rejected.

Visit the Boulder County Job Openings web page for current seasonal job openings, updated job descriptions and physical requirements, and to apply.

You may also call the Boulder County Job Hotline (303-441-4555), fax HR at 303-441-3494, or visit Boulder County Human Resources in person (2025 14th Street in Boulder). All applications and/or resumes must be post-marked on or before the closing date.

All seasonal positions require a good driving record and valid Colorado driver’s license and pass a pre-employment physical and motor vehicle background check.
 
Internship in Real Estate Division
Conservation Easement Volunteer Intern
May - October 
(months and length are flexible)
Unpaid

Duties:  Boulder County Parks and Open Space Department is recruiting for a volunteer Conservation Easement intern to assist with various duties related to management and acquisition of Conservation Easements (CE). Length of internship can be tailored to the successful applicant’s needs.  Duties may include: prepare and maintain monitoring files, conduct site visits monitoring for compliance with CE terms, identify and research potential violations of CEs, respond to landowner inquiries, participate in meetings and hearings, maintain current data in a database, obtain and review due diligence items for conservation easement transactions, create baseline documentation reports for CE transactions, develop management plans for properties with assistance from natural resources staff and assist Real Estate Division staff with various projects.  To round out the intern’s experience, the intern will also be assigned non-real estate projects according to the intern’s interests.

Qualifications: At least two years’ prior work experience required.  Prefer bachelor’s degree, or nearly-earned degree requiring an internship, in resource management, land conservation, conservation easement stewardship, or related field.  General knowledge of the principles and practices of land conservation, land management, and land stewardship required, as well as strong oral and written communication skills, ability to work effectively with others including the public, proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel required.  Working knowledge of Microsoft Access, ArcGIS, and GPS units helpful. Position is open until filled; however, applications are preferred by May 1 and may be submitted early. To Apply for this internship only: Contact: 303-678-6266

Seasonal Jobs in the Resource Management Division 

Education and Outreach (one opening), April-October
$15/hour

Duties: Assist with outdoor volunteer work projects; conduct park patrol by foot/bike and inform visitors about local resources & stewardship of public lands; staff tabletop displays at trailheads & local festivals; write educational materials for publications & exhibits; and perform related duties as required. 

Qualifications: Two years of college course work in Environmental Education, Interpretation, Resource Management or related field, and one season of experience directly related to interpretation or resource management.  Must wear uniforms and work Wednesday through Sunday workweek.

Cultural History (one 24 hour/week opening), mid-March to mid-November
$15/hour

Duties: Typical of a small museum generalist: lead and assist with educational programs such as site tours, special events, and general visitor services at the Agricultural Heritage Center and Walker Ranch Homestead; schedule tours with teachers and group leaders; research and catalog historical artifacts; research and perform living history demonstrations; write articles for department publications, develop exhibits, assist with volunteer trainings and coordinate volunteer projects, care for livestock and perform related duties as required.

Qualifications: Education: At least two (2) years of college course work in History, Interpretation, Museum Studies, or related field. Experience: One (1) season of experience directly related to public interpretation. Knowledge of Colorado history, agriculture, and volunteer management skills desired. Must have a valid Colorado (or state of residency) driver's license, and a good driving record and current automobile insurance. Must wear uniform, occasional historic costume, and work Friday through Sunday or Saturday through Monday.

Park Ranger, April-October
$15/hour

Duties: Duties include planning, implementing, coordinating and evaluating a variety of law enforcement and emergency response functions including park patrol and visitor education.  In addition, this position will assist resident park rangers with the daily operations and maintenance of park properties.  Areas of focus will include weed management, forestry, trailhead maintenance, volunteer supervision, wildlife management, and other resource management activities. 

Qualifications: At least two years of college course work in natural resources, park management and/or related field. Two years of park law enforcement experience. Local knowledge of flora and fauna and experience with noxious weed management. Working knowledge of ecological principles and resource management techniques. Skills in planning, organization and time management. Ability to work and communicate effectively with the public, co-workers and other agencies. Some experience supervising park volunteers, youth corps teams and/or high school students. Job offer is contingent on passing a pre-employment physical. 

Plant Ecology Restoration Technician, March-October
$15/hour

Duties:  Boulder County Parks and Open Space Department has an opening for a Seasonal Plant Ecologist/Restoration Technician to perform a variety of duties in the area of restoration maintenance and management.  Duties will include: assisting the Plant Ecology staff with ecological restoration projects, including flood recovery efforts; weed management by mowing, pulling, and spraying; maintaining irrigation systems and watering; leading Boulder County Youth Corp and volunteer crews: native seed collection, vegetation monitoring, GIS data collection, and performing related duties as required.

Qualifications:  One year of landscape, parks maintenance or related experience.  Experience with drip irrigation systems, weed whips,  pumps, chainsaw, and other related landscape maintenance equipment.  Two years of college course work in botany, natural resources management, plant ecology, range ecology, or related field preferable.  Familiarity with native plants a plus.  Able to work independently and as part of a team. Job offer is contingent on passing a pre-employment physical.

Wildlife Technician (Prairie Dog), June-October (20 weeks)
$15/hour

Duties: Assist with prairie dog management on open space lands. Specific duties include: assessment of prairie dog populations on properties; surveying for burrowing owl occupancy and other sensitive species on colony sites; removal of prairie dogs from undesirable locations using live trapping methods; humanely dispatching excess prairie dogs for use in predator recovery programs; use of GPS system to map colonies. May assist in placement of visual barriers and other deterrents. May relocate prairie dogs if conditions warrant. May implement direct control measures. May assist with research projects by non-POS entities. May assist with other non-prairie dog wildlife projects if opportunities arise.

Qualifications: Two years of college course work in Wildlife Biology, Resource Management, Ecology, Zoology or related field.  Previous fieldwork with mammals, especially prairie dogs, and GPS experience is preferred. Must be willing to occasionally work weekends and under potentially adverse weather conditions.

Special Requirements: Must be able to work long hours outdoors and tolerate adverse weather conditions. Must possess a valid Colorado driver’s license. Must be available to work outside of typical work hours, as needed.  Must wear a uniform (supplied), and own adequate footwear. 

Wildlife Technician (General), May-August (16 weeks)
$15/hour

Duties: Assist with wildlife habitat management on open space lands.  Specific duties include:  wildlife surveys of birds and mammals by specific protocols, including breeding birds; remote camera surveys; wildlife-related forestry stand assessments, data entry, fencing/restoration projects for habitat protection; aspen and/or shrub sampling and stand mapping; spring, stream, and habitat survey work. May assist with research projects by non-POS entities.

Qualifications: Minimum two years of college course work in Wildlife Biology, Resource Management, Ecology, Zoology, or related field.  Undergraduate degree is preferred. Previous experience, especially field surveys, GIS and GPS is preferred. Ability to work well with others, including volunteers is preferred. Ability to work independently is preferred. Strong orienteering ability is required. Must be able to hike long distances with equipment (backpack).  

Special Requirements: Must be able to work long hours outdoors and tolerate adverse weather conditions. Must possess a valid Colorado driver’s license. Must be available to work outside of typical work hours, as needed.  May need to wear a uniform (supplied). and own adequate footwear for extensive hiking. 

Roadside Mowing Operator (2 openings), April – September
$15/hour

Duties: Operate medium size tractors with rotary cutters for mowing vegetation along County roads; service and perform minor repairs and adjustments to assigned equipment; and check/record/report present or anticipated mechanical problems with equipment. Job also requires identification and mechanical control of state listed noxious weeds. Perform a variety of semi-skilled duties in weed management within County Right-of-ways.

Qualifications: High school graduation or equivalent and one-year experience operating mowing or farm equipment.  Experience with vegetation mowing preferred. May require working outside normal working hours, overtime and weekends. A qualified applicant will be able to repetitively lift 50 pounds.   This job requires wearing uniform and personal protective equipment with ability to work alone. Open until filled.

Open Space Mowing Operator, May-September
$15/hour

Duties: Operate and maintain medium size tractor with rotary cutters for mowing vegetation within County Open Space properties and interior access roads. Job also requires identification and mechanical control of state listed noxious weeds.

Qualifications: High school graduation or equivalent and one-year experience operating mowing or farm equipment.  Job offer is contingent on passing pre-employment physical. A qualified applicant will be able to repetitively lift 50 pounds.  This job requires wearing uniform and personal protective equipment with ability to work alone. Open until filled.

Invasive Plant Technician, April-October
$15/hour

Duties: Perform a variety of semi-skilled duties in weed management on County lands.  Specific duties include mix, load and apply herbicides using motorized and hand held equipment; mow weeds; operate, maintain, repair and calibrate equipment; identify and map weed infestations using GPS equipment and work with volunteer groups. Job offer is contingent on passing a pre-employment physical (must be able to lift 50 pounds).  Once hired, candidates will be required to pass the State of Colorado Pesticide Applicator Examination in order to obtain a Pesticide Applicator’s License, paid for by Parks and Open Space. 

Qualifications:  High school graduate or equivalent; mechanical aptitude, physical endurance and good record-keeping skills. Experience in applying herbicides desirable. Open until filled.

Seasonal Jobs in Agricultural Resources Division

Agricultural Technician I, May-August
$14/hour

Duties: The Agricultural Resources Division of Boulder County Parks and Open Space currently have an opening for a Seasonal Agricultural Technician. It is a 40 hour/week, position to start in May. Starting and ending dates are flexible to accommodate student schedules. 

The position involves assisting agricultural staff and farm/ranch tenants in a broad range of maintenance projects and monitoring activities on POS agricultural lands. An emphasis of the position will entail monitoring grazed pastures and rangelands. Other duties will also revolve around land maintenance projects including maintenance of permanent and temporary fencing, livestock handling and watering facilities, irrigation infrastructure and other maintenance projects. GPS/GIS projects and other duties as assigned.

Qualifications: The ideal candidate will be a high school graduate or equivalent. Farm and/or ranch and irrigation experience, familiarity with livestock, basic knowledge and experience in construction and maintenance of livestock fencing including electric fence.  Experience in the use of hand tools, power tools and operation of small engines and equipment is required. Must have a valid Colorado driver’s license and ability to drive pick-up with loaded trailer. Must be able to perform physical outdoor work under summer weather conditions, including lifting and other labor associated with fence construction and maintenance.  Experience in operating farm & construction equipment, including farm tractors is desirable. Experience and/or training with GPS/GIS is desirable but not required.  Job offer is contingent on passing a pre-employment physical.

Agriculture Resource Tech- Water Quality, 12 weeks
$14/hour                                                                                                                                         

In response to recently adopted policies guiding our cropland and water resources, we are in the process to formalize monitoring of the impacts of agricultural activities to water quality. The Agricultural Resource Division currently has an opening for a Seasonal Agricultural Water Quality Technician. The position is a temporary, 12 week, full-time position to start in May-June. Starting and ending dates are flexible to accommodate student schedules. 

Duties:  The primary emphasis of the position will involve assisting Agricultural Resource Specialists in the design of a formal program to monitor water quality on BCPOS agricultural lands. The scope of the position will involve working with BCPOS staff to research and establish water quality monitoring goals & objectives, parameters to be monitored, sampling methodology, analysis of samples and data collection, organization and analysis. The successful candidate will be the “workhorse” of this project, with guidance from Agricultural Resource Specialists.

Secondary duties may involve installation of irrigation water measuring /recording devices, collection of data, management of data and updating GPS/GIS information related to of irrigation ditches, conveyance systems and infrastructure. 

Qualifications: The ideal candidate will be a high school graduate or equivalent with at least one to two years college coursework in water resources / water quality related field.  Experience/familiarity with crop irrigation systems and agricultural operations in general is desirable. Must have a valid Colorado driver’s license and ability to drive a pick-up. Must be able to perform physical outdoor work under summer weather conditions, including walking, lifting and other labor associated with installation of water measurement devices, GPS of irrigation ditch systems, etc. Experience and/or training with GPS/GIS are desirable but not required.  Job offer is contingent on passing a pre-employment physical. PLEASE PROVIDE A LIST OF PERTINENT COURSES COMPLETE AND CURRENTLY BEING TAKEN.

Seasonal Jobs in the Recreation & Facilities Division

Mowing Crew, April - September
$13/hour
                                                                                                                                                            
Duties: Perform mowing of trail head parking areas, trail sides, and other park facilities; maintain mowing equipment, perform semi-skilled tasks in the operation of hand tools, power tools, and equipment, and performing related duties as required. Hiring will be dependant on passing a pre-placement physical examination.

Qualifications: One year of mowing experience and an ability to perform manual labor for extended periods of time in a variety of weather and topographic conditions.  Application Deadline April 12.

Trail Worker, April-September
$13/hour

Duties: Perform a variety of semi-skilled duties in the construction and maintenance of County trails (natural and improved surface trails), trailheads, parking lots, and other park facilities. 

Qualifications: High school graduation or equivalent and prefer one year of trail/park maintenance preferred. Ability to perform manual labor for extended periods of time in a variety of weather and topographic conditions. Ability to use hand and power tools in the construction and maintenance of park facilities. Hiring will be dependent on passing a pre-placement physical examination. Open until filled.

Trail Worker/Volunteer Work Projects, April-September
$13/hour

Duties: The primary function of a Seasonal Trails Worker is to perform project management, support, and volunteer leadership coordination on volunteer trail projects in the field.  This position also performs a variety of semi-skilled duties in the construction and maintenance of County trails, trailheads, and other park facilities.  

Qualifications: High school graduation or equivalent and prefer one year of trail/park maintenance and previous experience working with volunteers. Ability to perform manual labor for extended periods of time in a variety of weather and topographic conditions. Ability to effectively work and communicate with a variety of employees and volunteers.  Hiring will be dependent on passing a pre-placement physical examination. Open until filled.

Tree Care, April-September
$13/hour

Duties: Provide tree and plant care at park facilities such as watering, mulching, weeding, and planting; performing semi-skilled tasks relating to grounds maintenance, and performing related duties as required. Hiring will be dependant on passing a pre-placement physical.  

Qualifications: One year of tree and plant care experience and an ability to perform manual labor for extended periods of time in a variety of weather and topographic conditions. Application Deadline April 12.


Seasonal Jobs at Fairgrounds Park

Fairgrounds Worker, April-September
$12/hour

Duties: Perform a variety of semi-skilled duties for the Boulder County Fairgrounds in Longmont relating to building and grounds maintenance. Specific duties include: maintenance on the grounds and buildings; direct work of community service workers; perform custodial duties; operate mowing equipment, small riding tractors, and all hand tools. Skills in operating tractors and skid steer equipment are highly desirable.

Qualifications: High school graduation or equivalent and one year of parks or building and grounds maintenance experience.  Must be able to pass a pre-employment physical and be able to work weekends, some holidays, and work a flexible schedule. Application Deadline April 25.

All seasonal positions require a good driving record and valid Colorado driver’s license and pass a pre-employment physical and motor vehicle background check.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3922Tue, 28 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Teens and adults can apply for summer jobs with Boulder County Youth Corps Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County residents ages 14-17 can now apply for summer jobs with the Boulder County Youth Corps. Boulder County is also hiring adults to be team leaders. Boulder County is especially in need of female Corps members and leaders.

The deadline to submit youth applications is Friday, March 28. Other positions are open until filled.

The Youth Corps will hire 150 teenagers to work 30 hours per week, Monday through Thursday, from June 16 to August 6 on a variety of community service projects. Team leaders will be employed from June 4 to August 8 to work up to 40 hours per week, Monday through Friday. Projects will include such activities as forest thinning, historic preservation, construction and repair of fencing, trail construction and maintenance, landscaping and removal of Russian olive trees and noxious weeds. Youth Corps teams will work in unincorporated Boulder County as well as in cities and towns within Boulder County.

Applicants can apply online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps. Applications can also be picked up at counseling offices in Boulder Valley and St. Vrain Valley schools; city and town personnel offices; most local recreation and youth centers and libraries; and the Boulder County Human Resources Department, 2025 14th St. (Boulder).  

This year, Corps members will earn a starting wage of $8.00/hour, with the possibility of earning a $100 bonus at the end of the program based on merit and strong attendance. Teens who have worked for the Corps in past years can earn up to $8.50/hour. In addition, Corps members are eligible for reimbursement for the purchase of work boots and gloves and RTD bus passes.  

Team leaders must be high school graduates at least 21 years old with two years of college coursework or more, and assistant team leaders must be high school graduates at least 18 years old, among other qualifications. A list of full qualifications is available online at www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps.  Team leaders start at $13.50/hour and assistant team leaders at $11.50/hour. 

The Youth Corps offers one of the best first-job opportunities available in Boulder County.  Teams have completed projects such as resurfacing one-half mile of the Cradleboard Trail at Rock Creek Open Space, checking/replacing almost 4,000 light bulbs with LEDs and painting almost 200 residential light pedestals, and bike trail construction and maintenance at Valmont City Park.   

For more information, visit www.bouldercounty.org/youthcorps or call the Youth Corps office at 303-678-6104. 


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3921Mon, 27 Jan 2014 10:00:00
General countywide roadside debris removal is coming to a closeBoulder County will work with specific neighborhoods regarding additional removal

Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County’s initial roadside debris removal project is coming to a close. Residents of unincorporated areas should place debris piles near the roadside as soon as possible and are asked to report the location of the debris piles by filling out a Debris Reporting Form, emailing debrisresponseteam@bouldercounty.org or calling 720-564-2222.

The contractor will be making deliberate trips to particular locations at which the county has been informed there is debris near the roadside. These countywide trips will be wrapping up in the next few weeks, so residents should not place any debris on the roadside after Jan. 31.

Boulder County will continue evaluating the need for additional debris removal services and will work with residents in the hardest hit areas. In specific neighborhoods we will continue collection as long as the weather permits. If there is another round of countywide debris collection it will be in the spring, possibly in April, when the seasonal thaw begins.

Due to overwhelming quantities of debris on private property the county will not be able to assist in removing any debris from private property at this time, but is currently creating a database of debris locations and exploring options for future removal. Residents should also fill out the Right of Entry form so the county can access private property to assess debris quantities and determine if the debris poses an imminent threat. 

Please visit www.BoulderCountyFlood.org for a list of debris collection guidelines and rules. Remember that hazardous materials should be taken to the Hazardous Materials Management Facility at 1901 63rd St in Boulder. 

For more information, call 720-564-2222 or email debrisresponseteam@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3920Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Wildfire Partners launches, offering residential wildfire mitigation assistance and rebates New pilot program aims to protect homes and property from wildfire

Boulder County, Colo. – Wildfire Partners is a new, voluntary program to help homeowners prepare for wildfire. Boulder County is encouraging residents to apply for this unique opportunity to receive valuable wildfire mitigation assistance and rebates.

This pilot program is funded by Boulder County and a $980,000 Wildfire Risk Reduction Grant from the Colorado Department of Natural Resources, along with numerous partners.

“The Fourmile Canyon Fire, High Park Fire, Waldo Canyon Fire, Black Forrest Fire and other wildfires tell us that we could be next,” said Sugarloaf resident and firefighter CB Bassity. “The assistance from Wildfire Partners will be a great help to residents. Websites and brochures are helpful, but these folks know their stuff and can see things we might overlook.”

How to Apply
Homeowners must apply and be accepted into the program to take advantage of this opportunity. Wildfire Partners plans to accept 500 homeowners in 2014. Anyone not accepted this year will be placed on a waiting list.

The Wildfire Partners’ application can be completed and submitted online, at www.WildfirePartners.org or by calling a Wildfire Advisor, at 303-446-7877. Applications must be submitted by March 3 to be considered. 

Eligibility Requirements
  • Home must be located in unincorporated western Boulder County, or the towns of Jamestown, Lyons, Nederland or Ward.
  • Applicants must own their home. (Renters are not eligible to apply.)
  • Applicants agree to participate in an individual home assessment and complete recommended mitigation measures.

"Wildfire mitigation not only improves forest health, but enhances your safety, the safety of your family and friends, community and, importantly, that of emergency responders working to control a wildfire,” said Brett Haberstick, former Sunshine Fire Protection District Chief.

Many Boulder County residents are already working hard to prepare for future wildfires, but many still require assistance. Wildfire Partners offers many benefits, including:
  • An individual, on-site, wildfire home assessment with a Wildfire Mitigation Specialist and a customized report that identifies the weak links in a home’s defenses.
  • $300 in rebates for every Wildfire Partner and additional need and merit-based rebates for some participants.
  • Free access to Wildfire Phone Advisors, available by phone at 303-446-7877 from 8 a.m.–6 p.m., Monday–Friday to answer questions and support on-site mitigation efforts.
  • A follow-up inspection that takes place after recommended mitigation measures are completed.
  • A certificate stating homeowners performed recommended mitigation actions.

Through the grant, 8 wildfire mitigation experts have been hired as on-site Wildfire Mitigation Specialists, and a team of Wildfire Phone Advisors are available to assist residents.

"I am very excited to part of this partnership between mitigation experts and landowners,” said Wildfire Mitigation Specialist Abby Silver. “One-on-one communication seems to me to be a formula for success, because each homeowner has their own personal priorities and preferences that will be taken into account when determining a treatment plan for their property that conforms to current best practices in home ignition zone mitigation."

For more information or to apply, visit www.WildfirePartners.org or contact a Wildfire Advisor at 303-446-7877.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3919Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Lefthand Canyon closed to cyclists Monday-Saturday beginning Jan. 27Construction crews will be hauling large material into the canyon 

Boulder County, Colo. – Lefthand Canyon from U.S. 36 to Lee Hill Road will be closed to cyclists Monday through Saturday for the next five weeks while construction crews transport large materials into the canyon for flood repairs. 

Cyclists may use Lefthand Canyon on Sundays when the contractor is not utilizing the roadway. 

What: Lefthand Canyon temporarily closed to cyclists Monday-Saturday
When: Beginning Jan. 27
Who: Cyclists
Where: From U.S. 36 to Lee Hill Road

Boulder County Transportation would like to thank both cyclists and motorists for their continued patience while we repair the roads as quickly as possible. In order to expedite the repairs and to improve the ability of our contractors to work in the constrained corridor, we are asking cyclists to respect the temporary restrictions.

We want to remind all residents that while we are making progress on repairing the roads, we still have more to do (please refer to www.BoulderCountyFlood.org for updates). 

For more information about this temporary closure, call the Transportation Department at 303-441-3900. For information about alternative cycling routes during road reconstruction, please contact Hannah Polow, at hpolow@bouldercounty.org or 720-564-2864.


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3918Fri, 24 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Unattended Death Investigation in Northeast Boulder County, COBOULDER COUNTY SHERIFF- On Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014 at approximately 9:50pm, deputies with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the 12900 block of Hillcrest Drive in northeastern Boulder County, Colorado on a welfare check.  Authorities were summoned to the address by the decedent’s two adult children, who had not heard from their mother in several weeks and advised that she lived by herself.  Upon arrival, deputies had to force entry into the residence after receiving no response from inside the house, even though several lights were on and both the decedent’s vehicles were parked inside the garage.  Deputies also discovered several package delivery attempt notices taped to the front door that were at least a week old.  Inside the residence, deputies found the resident of the house, a 70-year-old female, deceased.

Investigators from the Sheriff’s Office and Boulder County Coroner’s Office are investigating the death.  The preliminary investigation found no indications of foul play or obvious trauma.  The Coroner’s Office will make a determination as to the cause and manner of death once they have completed their investigation. 

The Boulder County Coroner’s Office will release the name of the decedent once they have confirmed that all family members have been notified of the death.

The Boulder County Sheriff’s Office case number for this incident is 14-0344.

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3917Thu, 23 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Sheriff’s Office Explorers Take First Place in Chandler, Arizona Explorer CompetitionMEDIA ADVISORY
Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

 

CONTACT
Heidi Prentup
303-441-1500
HPrentup@bouldercounty.org


Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Sheriff’s Office Explorers Take First Place in Chandler, Arizona Explorer Competition

BOULDER COUNTY-Between January 16 and 20, 2014, ten Sheriff’s Explorers from Post 500 traveled with two adult advisors to Chandler, Arizona to compete in the 16th Annual Tactical Competition for Police Explorers.  They brought home three trophies, a 1st place, 2nd place, and 5th place. 

The Chandler Arizona Tactical Competition was first held in 1999 and brings together Explorer Cadets, youth from 16 to 21 years of age, from around the nation to compete in 25 different tactical events that include Hostage Rescue, Crisis Negotiations, Explosive Ordinance Response, Decision Shoot, Marijuana Field Raid, Incident Command Exercise, Downed Officer Rescue and an Obstacle Course.  The youth are evaluated on their speed, planning, and execution of the mission, safety, communication and teamwork, ability to identify and respond to threats, decision making, command presence, and leadership during the competition. 

The Sheriff’s Office is proud of the way our Post represented us in this year’s competition!

This media release may be found on the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office web-site at:  www.bouldersheriff.org


# # #

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3916Sheriff’s Office Explorers Take First Place in Cha
Deputies followed proper protocol and policy when suicidal male brandished weaponSheriff Joe Pelle release the following memo today, January 21, 2014:
 
On December 29th, 2013, Deputy Brandon Bussard and Deputy Gary Robinson were dispatched to 8309 N. 95th Street in unincorporated Boulder County regarding a welfare check on a possibly suicidal male. They arrived at approximately 9:00 a.m.    They spoke to the reporting parties and initiated contact with the male party, Mr. Christopher George.  Within a few minutes of contact, Mr. George pulled a handgun from behind his back, “racked” the action, and pointed the gun directly at Deputy Bussard at close range.  Deputy Bussard pulled his handgun and shot Mr. George, firing a total of three times.  Mr. George fell and dropped the weapon, which was secured by Deputy Robinson.  Mr. George was given aid, and was transported to the hospital via medical helicopter. He later died of his wounds.

 

A thorough investigation of the incident was completed by a multi-agency investigative team, the “Boulder County Investigative Team”.  The investigative findings were presented to the Sheriff and the District Attorney on January 15th, 2014.  The findings and the case file have been reviewed by both the DA and the Sheriff.  The District Attorney has determined the use of deadly force by Deputy Bussard was justified under the law.  I have determined that the deputy’s actions were justified and within our policy and training guidelines.

 

In this case the deputies followed proper protocol and policy as follows:

 

1.      Deputy Bussard arrived first, waited for a cover car, and reviewed the CAD call notes while he waited.  When Deputy Robinson arrived, they approached the home together, contacted and spoke to the calling family members, and gathered information.  They were told Mr. George was depressed, possibly suicidal, did not have any known access to weapons, and had left a possible suicide note in his room.

2.      Deputy Bussard contacted Mr. George in his bedroom and initiated conversation with him to try and ascertain the problem. Mr. George’s sister, who had been in the room with him, stepped out as Deputy Robinson stepped in.  She pointed out to Deputy Robinson a possible suicide note in the room as she left.

3.      Mr. George remained seated on his bed, half covered by bedding, sitting with his back to the wall.  He refused to converse with the deputies and wanted them to leave.

4.      Within a few minutes of the contact, Mr. George reached behind his back and produced a handgun.  He “racked” the gun by manipulating the slide action and pointed it at Deputy Bussard’s chest area from a distance of a few feet.  Examination of the weapon post-incident revealed that it had in fact been cocked, creating a “stovepipe” jam of one round at the chamber, (rendering the gun temporarily unable to fire).

5.      Deputy Bussard yelled “gun”, pulled his duty weapon, and at close range fired three rounds at Mr. George.  Deputy Bussard’s rounds struck Mr. George in the lower body twice, Deputy Bussard quit firing when Mr. George fell to his side and dropped his weapon.

6.      Deputy Robinson also pulled his weapon, stepped to a position to obtain a clear shot, intent on firing, but stopped when he saw Mr. George fall to his side and drop his weapon.  He then crawled up partially onto the bed and secured Mr. George’s weapon.

7.      The deputies immediately called for medical help and more officers to respond.  They rendered aid, and arranged for a medical helicopter to respond.

8.      The scene was properly secured, and a full investigative response initiated.

 

In this case the deputies were careful and considerate in their response.  They were lawfully on the premises at the request of the family, the homeowner, Mr. George’s mother. They were attempting to gather information to determine if a mental health hold was in order.  The subject in this case, Mr. George, appears to have intentionally placed the deputy in a position which required the use of deadly force to defend himself and others from the imminent use of deadly force.  This use of force by the deputy was within the law and department policy.  Other than waiting for the subject to shoot him, the deputy had no choice and reacted appropriately and according to his training. 

 

The sad irony in this matter is that the family had called us for help, and instead the call ended tragically for them.  That, of course, is never a desirable outcome.  However, given the information the deputies had when they arrived, they responded and reacted appropriately.  The end result was wholly within the control of Mr. George, who appears to have acted intentionally to cause this result. Our thoughts and prayers continue to go out to his family, who have been greatly traumatized by this entire incident.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3915Tue, 21 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Residents invited to flood damage and insurance workshop - Feb. 4Boulder County, the Long-Term Flood Recovery Group and United Policyholders host this free workshop

Boulder County, Colo. – Residents whose homes were damaged or destroyed in the 2013 Flood are encouraged to attend the Roadmap to Recovery™ Workshop on Feb. 4. Attendees will hear from a United Policyholders staff member and a flood damage expert on insurance matters.

The workshop will help residents navigate insurance claims and learn how to be prepared for any future natural disaster: 

  • Tuesday, Feb 4, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
    Boulder County Courthouse, 1325 Pearl St., Commissioners’ Hearing Room, 3rd Floor
The workshops will cover several topics and residents will have the opportunity to ask questions, including:
  1. Has your property been thoroughly and properly inspected?
  2. Have you recovered all amounts owed? Flood insurance? Homeowners insurance?
  3. Do you need to file a supplemental claim, and if so, how?
  4. Is your flood damage paperwork in order?
Often, the cost to rebuild, especially in the mountains, exceeds the amount of coverage policyholders carry for their homes and other property. Adding to this problem is the homeowner’s lack of awareness that the policies they carry are inadequate.

For more information about the workshop, contact Katie Arrington at karrington@bouldercounty.org or 303-441-1609.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3914Tue, 21 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Boulder County recruits people of color for the People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL) training programBoulder County, Colo. - In an effort to increase the number of low-income people of color on boards and commission, Boulder County Community Action Programs has developed People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL), a training program educating individuals from Boulder County’s diverse communities about the inner-workings of boards and commissions. Participants learn about leadership development, communication styles, budget and fundraising, the difference between boards and commissions and more. 

Low-income people of color interested in civic engagement across Boulder County are invited to register for the PERL training program. This ten-week session will focus on connecting our communities of color with non-profit organizations and commissions ready to embrace inclusion.  

People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL) Spring 2014 Training Program 
What: Board and Leadership Training 
When: Wednesdays, Feb. 19 - April 23, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
            Participants will meet for 10 sessions 
Cost: FREE, residents must register in advance
Where: Foothills United Way - 1285 Cimmaron Dr. Ste. 101 Lafayette, CO
Who: Boulder County Residents

People Engaged in Raising Leaders (PERL) came about as a result of the inclusiveness work the Community Foundation was doing with non-profit organizations. Results from one of their surveys spoke to the need for more people of color to be on Boards and Commissions. 

As the pool of low-income people of color interested in participating on boards and commissions is low, the PERL program aims to change that to allow more board positions to be filled. Through increased outreach, training efforts and collaborations, the PERL program will help fill a niche that truly represents the diversity that exists in Boulder County.

For more information or to register, contact Susana Lopez-Baker at 303-441-3956 or slopez-baker@bouldercounty.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3913Tue, 21 Jan 2014 10:00:00
Forestry work at Mud Lake to begin in Feb.http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3912Tue, 21 Jan 2014 10:00:00Rescue of suicidal male at ChautauquaBoulder County, Colo. - On Dec. 4 at approximately 11 p.m., deputies from the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, officers from the University of Colorado Police Department and Boulder Police Department, a City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Ranger, and rescuers from Rocky Mountain Rescue Group and American Medical Response, responded to Chautauqua Park to search for a 19-year-old male student from CU-Boulder who had been reported as suicidal.

The male victim’s roommates had found a backpack containing some of his belongings in the area of the Bluebell Shelter and began their search from there, calling CUPD back to update them, as they had been working with CUPD officers initially to report their roommate as missing and suicidal.

A BCSO deputy, CUPD officer, and OSMP ranger were able to hike in to the victim, who was severely hypothermic, semi-responsive and severely frostbitten. They provided immediate lifesaving efforts to gently warm the victim until volunteer rescuers with Rocky Mountain Rescue Group could safely perform a technical evacuation of the victim down to an AMR ambulance. He was transported from the scene to Boulder Community Hospital for further evaluation.

While we discourage individuals from engaging in such a rescue effort without the proper training, equipment, and resources in place (in order to avoid becoming additional victims themselves), especially on such a bitterly cold, dark night, the victim’s roommates’ courageous efforts led to a successful suicide intervention and likely saved their roommate’s life.

At the time of this press release the victim’s medical condition is unknown. 

A copy of this press release can also be found at:  www.bouldersheriff.org  A photograph of the rescue, provided courtesy of RMRG, is attached to this press release.

 

Sergeant Clay Leak

Boulder County Sheriff’s Office

5600 Flatiron Pkwy

Boulder, Colorado 80301

303-441-3650

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3877Thu, 05 Dec 2013 10:00:00
Public Information Meeting - St. Vrain Creek Rehabilition Work on Open Space LandBoulder County, Colo. - Boulder County Parks and Open Space is hosting a public meeting on Thursday, Dec. 12, from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Parks and Open Space building in Longmont (map).  The purpose of the meeting will be to inform residents about upcoming emergency work along St. Vrain Creek on county-owned land to mitigate impacts left by the September flood.

Staff has been working diligently since the September flood to assess damages along St. Vrain Creek on county-owned properties between U.S. 36 and Airport Road.  As part of this assessment, the department has had to determine necessary short-term emergency fixes that will help reduce further risks during the next spring run-off event, while also considering potential long-term plans for the creek corridor on county property.  In addition, the department has been working with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other federal, state, and local agencies to determine the appropriate measures and funding sources for this type of work.  

Information will be provided about three main breaches along St. Vrain Creek that are in need of emergency repairs. The emergency work is expected to begin in late December 2013 and be completed by late February 2014.

For more information, visit www.BoulderCountyOpenSpace.org/stvrain or contact Ernst Strenge, BCPOS resource planner, at estrenge@bouldercounty.org or 303-678-6269.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3876Thu, 05 Dec 2013 10:00:00
Flood Tours of County Open Space
Boulder County Parks and Open Space is hosting a van tour of the flood damaged open space properties that are not open to the public. Attendees will also learn about plans for funding the work necessary to repair facilities and open damaged trails.

Be prepared for short hike at each property. 

Minimum age is 10 years old, with accompanying adult. Registration is required.

Properties We Will Visit
Vans
Tour vans will leave from the Parks & Open Space Building in Longmont (map) at 1 p.m. and will return by 3:30 p.m. Please arrive a few minutes before 1 p.m. so we can get everyone checked in.
 
What To Bring
Please bring sturdy shoes and dress appropriately for the weather.

Contact
Questions? Please call Pascale Fried at 303-678-6201 or email pfried@bouldercounty.org.


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3873Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:00:00
2013 Election Results and Turnout Maps
The maps are based on the final official results from the election.

The maps:
For more on precinct boundaries, view our election maps page.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3862Fri, 22 Nov 2013 10:00:00
Boulder County Public Health provides overdose prevention trainingBoulder County, Colo. – Each day in the United States, more than 100 people die as a result of drug overdose. On October 28, 2013, Boulder County Public Health launched a new program aimed at saving lives and reversing this trend. The program provides training and overdose prevention kits containing lifesaving medication. Ten people participated in the first training and received the kits.

Rates of drug overdose have increased dramatically in the past decade, with drug overdose surpassing motor vehicle accidents as the leading cause of accidental death. Overdose deaths in the U.S. involving opioid analgesics, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone, have increased from 4,030 deaths in 1999 to 16,651 in 2010. In fact, Colorado Governor Hickenlooper declared August 31, 2013, as “Drug Overdose Awareness Day.”

“Everyone deserves an opportunity to live a healthy life, including people who use drugs,” said Carol Helwig, Boulder County Public Health Communicable Disease Control Program coordinator. “This program is one way to support people who are so often stigmatized in our community.”

Each overdose prevention kit contains Naloxone, also known as Narcan, which can reverse the effects of a drug overdose from opiates, including heroin and prescription opiates, such as Percocet or Oxycontin.

To receive the overdose prevention kit, participants must complete the training session, which focuses on learning the signs of overdose. Signs of overdose include: 

  • Not responsive to sound or pain, such as a sternum rub
  • Not breathing
  • Blue lips or fingertips 
  • Loud gurgling sounds

Important life-saving steps are also reviewed in the training, including calling 911, making sure the airway is clear, pinching the nose and providing a rescue breath every 5 seconds (no chest compressions), and administering naloxone.

The overdose prevention program is a collaborative effort between two Boulder County Public Health programs – the Addiction Recovery Centers (ARC) and The Works (i.e. syringe access) program – and the Denver-based Harm Reduction Action Center (HRAC), which is the largest syringe access provider in the state. HRAC has provided training and naloxone kits to 165 individuals in Colorado; of those trained, HRAC has received 52 reports of instances when naloxone was used to reverse a life-threatening overdose. 

People interested in participating in the overdose prevention program can call the Boulder County Addiction Recovery Centers at 303.441.1281.

Background

The ARC focuses on providing treatment for individuals struggling to reduce their use and abuse of drugs and alcohol. They offer several medication-assisted treatment options that combine the latest in pharmaceutical and cognitive behavioral therapies. The combination of appropriate medication with group and individual therapy has been shown to increase the amount of time clients remain drug-free. For more information about treatment options, call 303.441.1281 or visit www.BoulderCountyARC.org.

The Works Program provides harm reduction supplies and education, HIV and hepatitis C testing and counseling, and immunizations for hepatitis A and B. Supplies, education, and testing are available at Boulder County Public Health offices located in Boulder and Longmont, as well as at the Boulder County AIDS Project (BCAP) in Boulder. For more information about The Works Program or locations, call 303-413-7500 or visit www.BoulderCountyWorks.org.


 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3841Wed, 13 Nov 2013 10:00:00
Boulder County's 2013 Election Audit UpdateBoulder County’s enhanced audit of the 2013 coordinated election began Friday afternoon. These are the contests selected for the audit:

  • City of Boulder Council candidates
  • City of Lafayette Council candidates
  • City of Longmont Council member at large
  • City of Louisville City Council person, Ward II
  • City of Louisville City Council person, Ward III
  • Estes Park School District school director at large
  • Thompson School District Director, District B
  • Thompson School District Director, District E
  • City of Lafayette Ballot Question 2A
  • City of Lafayette Ballot Issue No. 301
  • City of Longmont Ballot Question 2C
  • Lyons Regional Library District Issue 4C
  • Rocky Mountain Fire Protection District Question 5B
We’ll audit a total of 26,065 ballot contests this week and post the results when it's over.

Here’s the audit schedule and an overview of the audit, which is open to the public. You can also view a summary of which batches of ballots will be audited.
 
See BoulderCountyVotes.org for unofficial election results and more information.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3837Sat, 09 Nov 2013 10:00:00
Boulder County mailing ballots to voters todayBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is mailing ballots today to active, registered voters for the 2013 Coordinated Election.

So far, 199,968 Boulder County voters are set to receive mail ballots for the Tuesday, Nov. 5, election. A ballot will be sent to each active, registered voter. Each mail ballot packet includes a list of Voter Service and Polling Centers and ballot drop-off points that will open between now and Election Day. After returning their ballot, voters can check BoulderCountyVotes.org to make sure it was received.

Boulder County voters have the choice of voting by mail ballot, or at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day. They can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election.

Voters who aren’t registered can still register to vote until 7 p.m. on Election Day under a new state law passed earlier this year. Visit GoVoteColorado.com with a Colorado ID or driver’s license to register online no later than Monday, Oct. 28. Or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center by 7 p.m. on Election Day to register and get a ballot.

If you have been displaced by recent flooding and have not been receiving your mail at your registered address, you might not automatically receive a ballot because ballots are not forwardable mail. However, you are still eligible to vote. Please visit www.GoVoteColorado.com to confirm or update your mailing address by Oct. 28 to receive a mail ballot, or visit a Voter Service and Polling Center through 7 p.m. on Election Day to update your voter information and obtain a ballot. 

*Note: The Elections Division mailed 2,741 ballots to voters displaced by flooding in Jamestown and Lyons on Oct. 9. The measure should help ensure elections staff can identify and reach out to voters who have changed their address and must update their registration before receiving a mail ballot.

Key Dates for the 2013 Coordinated Election:
  • Tuesday, Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to all active, registered voters. 
  • Monday, Oct. 28: Last day to register to vote online for the coordinated election. New this year, voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day.
  • Tuesday, Nov. 5: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3795Tue, 15 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Equipment testing completed for 2013 electionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in Boulder County’s Nov. 5 Coordinated Election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test held this week.

Participants representing local municipalities and districts took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office. The tests confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes. 

The LAT also checked and confirmed that ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. The test included paper, electronic and audio ballots.

Total ballots tested: 1,163
Paper ballots: 1,058 
    • 80 by district and municipality participants
    • 978 by Elections Division staff
Electronic ballots (includes audio ballots): 105
    • 56 by district and municipality participants
    • 49 by Elections Division staff
Results and test records will be available for review next week at BoulderCountyVotes.org. Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the coordinated election.

Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check your registration or learn more about the election, and call 303-413-7740 or email Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org if you have questions. 

Key Dates for the 2013 Coordinated Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to all active, registered voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 28: Last day to register to vote online for the coordinated election. New this year, voters may register in person at a Voter Service and Polling Center up to and including Election Day.
• Tuesday, Nov. 5: Election Day. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3793Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Public Improvement and Special District Ballot Issues: Boulder County 2013 Coordinated ElectionTwo public improvement districts and five special districts are coordinating with Boulder County for the Nov. 5, 2013, coordinated election. Public Improvement and Special district elections have slightly different voter eligibility rules. Here’s an explanation and some links to additional information.

Which districts are participating in the Nov. 5 election?

Public Improvement Districts:
Special Districts:
Which voters are eligible to participate in the public improvement district elections?
1. A resident of the district registered to vote at an address in the district. 
2. A Colorado registered voter who owns taxable real or personal property in the district and their registered voter spouse. 
3. A Colorado registered voter who is obligated to pay taxes under a contract to purchase taxable property within the district.
4. A Colorado registered voter appointed by a corporate entity or trust owner of taxable real or personal property to vote on its behalf.

Which voters are eligible to participate in the special district elections?
1. A resident of the district registered to vote at an address in the district. 
2. A Colorado registered voter who owns taxable real or personal property in the district and their registered voter spouse.
3. A Colorado registered voter who is obligated to pay taxes under a contract to purchase taxable property within the district.

How can someone know whether they’re eligible to vote on these issues?

Eligible voters who live in one of these districts will see the public improvement and/or special district issue on their regular ballot.

Property owners who live outside the district, and representatives of entities or trusts, can contact the Boulder County Elections Division for more information on how to receive a ballot containing only the public improvement and/or special district issue if they or their designated voting representative are deemed eligible. Our office also sent a letter to these voters/entities in early October notifying them they may be eligible to participate in the election. The landowner mail ballot will arrive beginning the week of Oct. 14 in a green envelope to distinguish it from the white ballot envelopes used for standard mail ballots. 

If you have questions about this, please call us at 303-413-7740 or email Joan Barilla at jbarilla@bouldercounty.org.

What are the boundaries of these districts?

View the district boundaries on these maps:

Where can a voter read the ballot content for these district issues and find more information about them?
Who do I contact if I still have questions about obtaining a ballot or need other coordinated election information?

Call, email or visit our main office in Boulder, or visit our website:

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3764Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:00:00
Six Boulder County child care centers receive “Breastfeeding-Friendly” designationBoulder County – Six child care centers in Boulder County have been designated as “Breastfeeding Friendly” for making breastfeeding support a priority in their centers. Each center must meet a set of 10 criteria to receive the designation.

 

“Breastfeeding provides the healthiest start in life for infants. Unfortunately, children who are routinely cared for by someone other than their parents are less likely to be breastfed,” said Sarah Scully, Boulder County Public Health Child Health Promotion program coordinator. “By providing support and encouragement for breastfeeding in the child care center, we can help mothers continue to breastfeed.”

 

To receive the “Breastfeeding-Friendly” designation, centers must meet all of the certification criteria, including providing training and education to families, helping to normalize breastfeeding, properly storing and labeling breast milk, providing private areas for pumping and breastfeeding, and providing referrals for support.

 

Centers must also complete pre- and post-assessments, attend a training session, and conduct an on-site review with public health staff.

The following six child care centers achieved the Gold Level designation of Breastfeeding-Friendly Child Care Certification.

  • Back to Basics Child Care Center in Longmont. The center serves 46 families and employs 10 staff.
  • Boulder Day Nursery in Boulder. The center serves 55 families and employs 15 staff.
  • Boulder Valley Teen Parenting Program in Boulder. The program serves 18 families and employs 7 staff.
  • Primrose School in Longmont. The center serves 190 families and employs 30 staff.
  • The Aspen Center for Child Development in Longmont. The center serves 47 families and employs 11 staff.
  • The Cottage School in Boulder. The center serves 70 families and employs 16 staff.

“These centers are stepping up to make it easier for working mothers to continue breastfeeding, which ultimately helps to improve the health of young children,” said Scully.

 

The certification is reviewed every other year during the health inspection visit to ensure that breastfeeding-friendly practices are sustained.

 

Centers who receive the certification are provided with a Medela electric breast pump for use by staff and families.

 

For more information about the certification, or to find out how to encourage your center to become certified, contact Boulder County Public Health Child Health Promotion Program at 303.413.7502.

 

-end-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3763Tue, 24 Sep 2013 10:00:00
Text: Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall's Testimony Before the Presidential Commission on Election AdministrationPresidential Commission on Election Administration held a public meeting today in Denver as part of its national listening tour. As part of its mission to recommend best practices for election administration and improve the voting experience in the U.S., the commission heard testimony from election officials, voting experts and members of the public.

Here's a copy of the remarks Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall prepared for her testimony before the commission. She called for the PCEA to consider the cost of any election equipment necessary to implement the committee's recommendations. She also pointed to Colorado's newly passed election law as a possible model for efficient elections administration:


Good afternoon. My name is Hillary Hall. I’m the Clerk and Recorder of Boulder County, Colorado. Thank you for the chance to speak today.

As you explore how to tackle issues like long lines at polling places, and how technology should be used in elections, I’d like raise an important related concern that hasn’t received as much attention. That’s the high costs of election administration.

As you look at new ideas for elections in the U.S., I hope you’ll keep in mind the relationship between your recommendations and and the equipment that’s needed to carry them out. This is crucial -- and hasn’t always been considered in previous federal election mandates. We need election models that require less equipment, or less expensive equipment. Or we need federal funding to help us with service and maintenance costs at the local level.  

About a decade ago, the Help America Vote Act added some important new requirements for how our nation conducts its elections. It even provided elections divisions with some funding to purchase more modern equipment that met HAVA requirements.

But the equipment mandated by HAVA has high, ongoing costs. And there was no ongoing federal funding for those costs. County election divisions have spent the last decade eating millions of dollars in service and maintenance costs for the equipment. In Boulder County, we’ve paid about a million dollars’ worth of these fees since we purchased our system in 2004. Some large counties in Colorado have shelled out more than $10 million in service and maintenance costs for DRE machines, ballot scanners and other technology. In smaller counties, the total ongoing costs may be as high as $40 per voter.

These unexpected costs, combined with the economic downturn of recent years, have stretched resources for local election divisions. When that happens, it impacts the voters in many ways. Shorter hours of operations. Fewer polling places. Fewer election workers. Longer lines at polling places. Aging equipment.

When we look at the problems some counties saw in the 2012 election, it’s important to look at all of the causes. The high cost for maintenance and upkeep of equipment is one of these causes.

You have an opportunity now to create national election guidelines that address the problems we’ve seen in recent elections. And that’s a crucial, and formidable, task. But you can also do incredible good by creating guidelines for election administration that call for efficient, inexpensive, uniform equipment to help us do our jobs and Election Day.

My colleagues and I believe we’ve created a template for this with Colorado House Bill 1303. The new bill, enacted by our state legislature this year, issues a mail ballot to every active, registered voter. It also sets up voter service and polling centers in the weeks before Election Day to help voters who need assistance and provide ample time for early voting. 

The bill eliminates many of the voter access concerns your commission is trying to address and makes elections administration more efficient. In the long run, it will decrease the costs of administering an election by increasing mail ballot voting, which is easier and cheaper to administer than DRE or other electronic voting methods. And it allows us to concentrate our polling places. In Boulder County, we had 118 polling places last year. In the next general election, we’ll probably have 13. 

This means less equipment. Less staffing. Fewer costs across the board. All while increasing voter access and preserving the choice to vote in person. The new law makes sense for Colorado’s elections, and I believe it will have value in other states.

I wish you the best of luck as you work to address issues in our elections process. I think you also have a golden opportunity to help make our nation’s elections more lean, efficient and accessible. Whatever policies you recommend, please consider the equipment needed to implement them and the long-term costs to keep the equipment running. Thank you for your time today.

###

BoulderCountyVotes.org
On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3695Thu, 08 Aug 2013 10:00:00
Clerk & Recorder's Louisville Office to Close July 18; Will Reopen July 23 at New Lafayette LocationBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office has selected the July moving dates for its East County office.

The last day of business at the Louisville office, 722 Main St., will be Thursday, July 18. The office will be open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. that day. The office will reopen at its new Lafayette location, 1376 Miners Drive, at 8 a.m. Tuesday, July 23. 
The East County office will be closed on Friday, July 19, and Monday, July 22, for employees to move and set up equipment. The Clerk & Recorder’s other branches at 1750 33rd St. in Boulder and 529 Coffman St. in Longmont will remain open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on those days.

The move comes after the recent sale of the building at 722 Main St. in Louisville, where the Clerk and Recorder’s office has leased space for more than 20 years. The new owners plan to repurpose the building and asked Boulder County to relocate.

The new Lafayette office will include a larger waiting area for the public, improved parking and better access for clients with disabilities. The new building will feature a large conference room that can be used as a voting center during elections.

The Lafayette building will also serve as an alternate worksite for the Assessor, Treasurer and other administrative offices, which are relocating from a county-owned building at 400 E. Simpson St. in Lafayette. 


- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk  - 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3632Tue, 11 Jun 2013 10:00:00
Thanks to Everyone Who Helped Make Boulder County's Midnight Civil Union Opening a SuccessThe Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office issued 48 civil union certificates early Wednesday as the licenses became available in Colorado for the first time.

Our staff opened the doors at our Boulder location from 12:01 a.m. Wednesday until about 2:15 a.m. It was a very happy evening. May 1 is a historic day for Colorado. Our staff felt honored to be a small part of the celebration for so many couples who waited a long time for this day.

We’d like to thank Out Boulder, who also rented the Houston Room at our office for a celebration. We appreciate their help in collecting RSVPs and helping to check in couples as they arrived.

I’d also like to thank my staff at the Clerk & Recorder’s office for helping to meet the incredible demand for these licenses as soon as they were available. We actually had people from other departments volunteering to work in the middle of the night to help make it a success. I’m proud of my staff’s dedication to outstanding public service.

We’ll reopen for business at 8 a.m. this morning. Civil union licenses are available 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays at our three Clerk & Recorder offices:
  • 1750 33rd St., Boulder
  • 529 Coffman St., Longmont
  • 722 Main St., Louisville
- Hillary Hall, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder

More information:
Obtaining a Civil Union in Boulder County    
Frequently Asked Questions About Civil Unions  
On Twitter: @BoCoClerk 
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3559Wed, 01 May 2013 10:00:00
Frequently Asked Questions: Civil Union LicensesCivil union licenses will be available May 1, 2013, in Colorado. Here are some common questions we've fielded from the public:

What are the basic requirements and restrictions for applying for a civil union license?

The basic requirements are detailed on the civil union application page by the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office. We recommend reading that page for basic information and returning to this FAQ for more specific questions.

How much will it cost to obtain a civil union license from the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s office?

The application and license will cost $30. 

When and where can I obtain a license?

Our regular business hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at each of our three offices:
  • Boulder: 1750 33rd St.
  • Longmont: 529 Coffman St.
  • Louisville: 722 Main St.
On May 1, 2013, the day the Civil Union Act takes effect, we’ll also hold business hours from 12:01 a.m. to about 2 a.m. at our Boulder office only. We feel this will help accommodate the immediate demand for these licenses. All three offices will also be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. that day.

How long will it take to obtain a civil union license?

Wait times for service can vary. Once you sit down with a staff member in our office, the application process should take about 15 to 20 minutes.

Will I be able to walk out of the office with an official civil union?

Yes, if you choose to do so. When you apply for and receive a civil union license, you can choose to complete the civil union license on the spot, hand it back to the clerk and immediately be in a legally recognized civil union. Alternately, you can take the license with you, have a ceremony or other celebration within 35 days, sign the document there, and then mail back or bring back the signed certificate to our office within 63 days of certification. Colorado law allows for similar flexibility with marriage licenses.

Do I have to be a Boulder County resident to get a civil union license from the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office?

No. As long as you meet the legal requirements, two people from anywhere in the United States or the world can come to our office and obtain an application for a civil union. However, their civil union must take place in the state of Colorado.

If a couple has already entered a civil union or marriage outside Colorado, can they be issued a new civil union license here?

No.  Civil unions or substantially similar relationships legally created in another jurisdiction are deemed civil unions under the Colorado Civil Union Act.  COLO. REV. STAT. § 14-15-116(2).  Similarly, for a same-sex couple who married in another state, that relationship is also deemed to be a civil union in Colorado. COLO. REV. STAT. § 14-15-116(1). Although not required by law to do so, any couple married or in a civil union or substantially similar relationship legally created outside of Boulder County may record their marriage or civil union license in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office.  The recording cost is $11 for the first page and $5 for each additional page. The couple can obtain a copy of their recorded license for their own records. 

Who can I contact for more information?

Contact the Recording Division of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's office at recording@bouldercounty.org or 303-413-7770.


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3552Mon, 22 Apr 2013 10:00:00
County Commissioners approve tougher oil and gas regulations; extend moratorium on drilling permits until Juneoil drillLast year, the Board of County Commissioners adopted a year-long moratorium on new oil and natural gas drilling permits in unincorporated Boulder County in response to concerns over the increase in use of hydraulic fracturing in drilling operations and to provide the time needed to establish new rules and regulations governing future oil and gas development in the county.

This past December, after a nearly year-long public process, the County Commissioners approved a new set of rules, replacing regulations established in 1993, which are considered the most restrictive in the state.

Due to the complicated nature of the new restrictions, requirements, standards and conditions that replaced the 19-year-old rules for how oil and gas development can occur on unincorporated lands, commissioners approved an extension to the current moratorium through June 10 to provide adequate time to create an Implementation Work Plan.
 

Why not just ban fracking?  All three commissioners are opposed to the use of fracking in Boulder County. However, under Colorado law, counties have only the legal authority that has been delegated to them by the state legislature. This means Boulder County does not have the legal ability to ban fracking. If the county were to pursue a ban, litigation – similar to that ongoing between the state of Colorado and the city of Longmont – would likely ensue, and the courts would almost certainly overturn the ban.
 
The County Commissioners support stronger authority for local governments. They have signed on to a public letter to the Governor asking him to drop the lawsuit against Longmont and instead work with local governments. They have intervened in Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission hearings on setbacks and water quality, seeking better rules statewide and more authority for local governments. And they support legislation to tighten regulations and make state regulations a floor, not a ceiling.
 
What do the new regulations do?  The new regulations are designed to achieve the maximum protection for air quality, water quality and the environment that is legally possible for counties under current state law and are designed to address land use impacts associated with oil and gas operations.
 
Additionally, the county is looking at requiring extensive water quality monitoring by a neutral third party for all oil and gas pursuits in Boulder County.

What about the damage to roadways caused by oil and gas equipment?  This January, county staff presented information from the Oil & Gas Roadway Impact Study to seek direction from the County Commissioners on how to ensure that the impacts of oil and gas development on the public transportation system are mitigated and the cost of such mitigation is fairly distributed. Actual fees were not considered for adoption at the hearing, but the Commissioners asked staff to come back in two to three months with a proposal for the maximum legally-defensible fees possible.
 
Now that the county has passed regulations, could drilling start immediately?  No. These regulations are quite complicated, and will require significant time and effort to implement. Immediately following a January 24 public hearing where a draft implementation timeline was presented, the County Commissioners voted unanimously to extend the temporary moratorium on new oil and gas drilling applications through June 10 (previously set to end on Feb. 4).

Where do we go from here?  The County Commissioners and staff are working to make sure Boulder County has the most comprehensive and restrictive regulations around oil and gas drilling in the State of Colorado.

The Board has expressed a desire to see more effort toward developing renewable energy options for Boulder County and is seeking support from county residents to take their concerns about oil and gas development to state legislators who are currently considering new state-regulated rules for drilling operations.


For more information about the county’s role in oil and gas development, upcoming meetings and public involvement opportunities, visit the county’s Oil and Gas Development webpage or contact Jim Webster at 720-564-2600 or jbwebster@bouldercounty.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3469
Commissioners Help Create Awareness Around Youth Homelessness

Last November, Boulder County Commissioners Deb Gardner and Will Toor spent a cold night on the lawn outside of Attention Homes’ main office near 15th and Spruce in Boulder in order to raise awareness for a silent need in our community.

A total of 40 community and business leaders slept next to the at-risk youth support organization’s office as part of the inaugural Sleep Out Event. The event was sponsored by Attention Homes and the First United Methodist Church to raise awareness and funding for Boulder County’s homeless youth population.

“For runaways or homeless youth, the number of beds available in the whole metro area is somewhere close to around 86, while in any one night there can be up to 900 kids in need of a place to stay,” said Deb Gardner. “There is a real need that is not being met for youth without a home or with an unsafe situation at home.”

Each participant was asked to raise $1,000 from families, friends and colleagues, a goal which was met with funding to spare. Those involved were offered a meal donated from Pasta Jay’s and were asked to begin the following day without heading to their warm homes for a shower or a nap. 

“I went straight to a meeting in Longmont,” said Deb. “I hadn’t been home, I hadn’t showered and I felt the need to explain myself, which was great because I had an opportunity to talk to another group of people about what I had done the night before.”

The event was able to generate over $45,000 in addition to positive publicity from 9News, the Daily Camera and local TV personality, Ryan Van Duzer. This success has already stirred interest in bringing the event back next year. When asked if she would participate again next year, Commissioner Gardner said, “Absolutely. It’s a great way to raise awareness around a very important issue.”

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3466Fri, 01 Feb 2013 10:00:00
Boulder County Welcomes Elise Jones to first all-women Board of County CommissionersOn January 8, 2013, Elise Jones of Boulder was sworn in as Boulder County’s District 1 Commissioner, a post vacated by Commissioner Will Toor who was term-limited after eight years of outstanding service to Boulder County. Her appointment marks the first all-female board of commissioners in Boulder County’s 151-year history.

“What an incredible honor it is to represent and support Boulder County in a position that Commissioner Toor just deemed the best job in the world,” said Elise Jones after taking her oath of office. “We’re blessed to live in such a remarkable place, and I look forward to taking part in tackling the challenges that lie before us and continuing the hard work of our present and past county commissioners.”

Jones went on to acknowledge the county’s historic role in being both a leader and pioneer in tackling a host of pressing issues that will continue to demand attention in the coming years. Some examples of the challenges she named include oil and gas regulations, climate change, transit improvements, achievement gap, poverty, and ensuring healthy and sustainable food production on county open space lands.

Elise has lived in Boulder County for 15 years. She and her partner Karl have a seven-year-old daughter named McKenzie.

Up until her election as commissioner, Elise served as executive director for the Colorado Environmental Coalition for 13 years where she worked to protect local ecosystems and open space, pushed for sustainable transportation and promoted positive state legislation, among many other accomplishments.

In addition to a bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources from Cornell University and a master’s degree in Resource Policy, Planning and Administration from the University of Michigan, Elise has decades of experience working with the legislative process.

She has worked as a regional director for the League of Conservation Voters, a senior legislative assistant for an Oregon congresswoman, and a project coordinator for the National Wildlife Federation. She has dedicated her non-profit and volunteer time to the City of Boulder Planning Board, Denver metro area’s Regional Air Quality Council, Greenprint Denver Advisory Council and Colorado Conservation Voters.

Her experience in wildlife protection and environmental stewardship, in addition to her passion for fighting homelessness and pursuing clean energy and sustainable transportation options, complements the work of our already progressive Board of County Commissioners as she joins fellow commissioners Deb Gardner and Cindy Domenico.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3465
Six Counties Join Together to Address Wildfire Awareness

Wildfires may be less active at this time of year but now is a perfect time for regrouping and preparing for next year’s potential dangers. 


Although precipitation over the Front Range remains stubbornly low, the winter months are a much needed break from 2012’s intense wildfire season. Wildfires may be less active through this time of year but now is a perfect time for regrouping and preparing for next year’s potential dangers.

 

Last fall, Boulder County celebrated its second annual October Wildfire Awareness Month, an idea that came from the citizens of Boulder County who understand the importance of education and community involvement to effectively work ahead of the next wildfire. Activities throughout the month helped residents better understand wildfires and encouraged homeowners to take action to be prepared.

 

The month was capped off by a regional forum with five other counties who joined Boulder County in celebrating Wildfire Awareness Month. At the forum, Dr. Anthony Westerling presented his groundbreaking research, modeling climates and future wildfires in the west. The forum provided an opportunity for policymakers and agency staff to understand current research and discuss the changing, long-term implications facing the region.

 

“We will be scheduling a lot of forestry outreach activities to take place in spring and early summer of 2013, including a series of Community Forestry Workshops in locations throughout the foothills—most likely in Gold Hill, Nederland, Allenspark, Sugarloaf, Jamestown and Lyons,” said Ryan Ludlow, the Outreach Forester with Boulder County’s Land Use Department. “New in 2013 we plan to offer workshops on Firewise landscaping design and on how to retrofit your existing home to be more fire resistant. We will also be helping communities set up community chipping events, and our Community Forestry Sort Yard program, a free location for landowners to dispose of logs and slash, will start back up again in the spring.”

 

Outreach Foresters are also available to speak at local community and HOA meetings and offer on-site forestry workshops to groups to better educate county residents on wildfire risks and backyard forest management. Additionally, the County will be encouraging communities to participate in the Firewise Communities program that provides them with national recognition and helps them sustain mitigation efforts over the long-term.

 

Winter is a great time to prepare your home and family for the active wildfire season. As Ludlow stresses to all of Boulder County, “research strongly suggests that landowners who take personal responsibility and properly prepare for a wildfire can dramatically improve thechances of their home surviving an event.”


Watch for upcoming event schedules and updates by visiting the Forest Health Outreach program’s website at www.BoulderCounty.org/ForestHealth or by contacting Ryan Ludlow at 720-564-2641.


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3464
Local school-based program helps to reduce harmful youth behaviorBoulder County - An independent evaluation of the Boulder County Prevention and Intervention Program (BCPIP) reveals that 92% of the youth who were given support and treatment through the program improved or remained stable, particularly in areas related to self-harming behavior, moods, and emotions.  

 

Specifically, 55% of students showed significant improvement in functioning, while 37% demonstrated stabilization in their functioning.  Stabilization is noteworthy, given the multiple challenges many students face; levels of dysfunction may have continued to increase without support from the program.

 

“Identifying mental health issues and providing support for our youth is critical,” said Jen Brown, BCPIP Program Manager. “Being available for these kids saves lives.”

 

The county-wide youth prevention and intervention program is staffed by master’s degree-level counselors and social workers called “prevention/interventionists,” who are placed in 31 middle and high schools within the Boulder Valley and St. Vrain Valley School Districts.

 

Prevention/interventionists provide services ranging from mental health and substance abuse intake and assessment to youth leadership and mediation programs and training for faculty and staff. Support is coupled with referrals to community services.

 

“The severity of the issues our youth are coping with and the pure volume of need for our resources continues to multiply,” said Brown. “Prevention and Intervention Program staff is a touchstone for students – attending to their emotional health needs to help them better cope with the stresses of day-to-day life.”

 

The 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) indicates that one in four Boulder County high school students felt sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more in a row, and one in seven made a plan about how they would attempt suicide.

 

“Research shows that collaboration between schools, the community, and parents supports school safety and youth resiliency,” said Jeff Zayach, Boulder County Public Health Director. “With issues like these affecting our youth, particularly given recent violence in schools, it is imperative that we continue to fund and support proven programs such as this one.”

 

The majority of youth who met with prevention/interventionists in the 2011–2012 school year came for help with family problems, school issues, or stress levels. Also prevalent were issues related to depression, relationships, anger, and self-esteem.

 

Student and family participation in the program is voluntary and cannot be mandated. Services are available to all students in the school community and are provided free of charge.

 

The Boulder County Prevention and Intervention Program was founded in 1987 to improve students’ skills and abilities in dealing with problems and temptations and making decisions in a healthy and productive way. The program is managed and supported through a partnership with both county school districts and county, municipal, and non-profit agencies.

 

For more information about the program or to view the full evaluation reports, visit www.BoulderCountyPreventionIntervention.org.

 

- end -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3454Wed, 23 Jan 2013 10:00:00
Health officials warn about health risks at Sugar Mill siteBoulder County, Colo - The former Great Western Sugar Mill site, located at 11939 Sugarmill Road near Longmont, has been confirmed to be contaminated with asbestos and other potentially hazardous materials. In addition, the property has many physical dangers, such as structurally unsound buildings, open pits, and wells. Public health officials recommend that anyone who is authorized to enter the premises should wear a respirator and protective clothing. Being on the property without the owner’s permission is trespassing, and violators have been ticketed.  

“We’re concerned that residents may visit the site after the recent photo exhibition,” said Boulder County Public Health Environmental Health Division Manager Joe Malinowski. “It is very dangerous, both physically, and to your health.”
 
Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral that has been used in products for centuries. A growing number of health studies have linked disease to environmental asbestos exposure.  If disturbed, asbestos material may release asbestos fibers that can be inhaled into the lungs.  Breathing high levels of asbestos fibers can lead to an increased risk of:

  • Lung cancer
  • Mesothelioma, a cancer of the lining of the chest and abdominal cavity
  • Asbestosis, in which the lungs become scarred with fibrous tissue

Great West Sugar Company manufactured sugar from sugar beets at the site for approximately 75 years.  In 1977, Great West Sugar Company filed for bankruptcy and closed the mill. The site was purchased by a private investor in 1980.

Although the sugar mill is located near Longmont city limits, the facility sits in unincorporated Boulder County and is under Boulder County jurisdiction.

-end-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3404Thu, 13 Dec 2012 10:00:00
Final Unofficial Results Posted for 2012 General ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's office has posted the final unofficial vote tally for the 2012 General Election. Results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

The Boulder County Elections Division added 2,684 additional ballots to the tally today, for a total of 180,712 ballots counted for the Nov. 6 election. 

The ballots added today include provisional ballots, which have been under review by Elections Division staff since the day after Election Day. The staff reviews provisional ballots to make sure the voter was eligible to cast the ballot. The office reviewed the eligibility of 3,255 provisional ballots. Tuesday was the last day to verify and count provisional ballots.

The election results released today are technically “final unofficial” results. Results will be official after they are submitted to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office.

More election information: 303-413-7740 or BoulderCountyVotes.org.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3388Wed, 21 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Results Maps: How Boulder County Voted For President and Other Major RacesWe’ve created some maps showing how Boulder County voters in the county’s 234 precincts weighed in on the presidential race and other major contests.

These maps were updated Dec. 4 to reflect the final official results from the election.

The maps:

For more on precinct boundaries, see our election maps page.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3376Tue, 13 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Final Unofficial Results Available for 2012 General ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Elections Division has finished tallying votes for the 2012 General Election. Final unofficial election results are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.

The Elections Division has finished tallying the preliminary results of 174,364 ballots. Voter turnout for the General Election is 92.7 percent of 187,962 active registered voters in Boulder County. 

Letters are being mailed to mail-in ballot voters who need to cure their signatures or provide a photocopy of their ID in order for their votes to be counted. Voters can check their information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify whether their signature or ID was accepted. The deadline for voters to provide their signature or photocopy of ID is 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14.

Boulder County elections staff will also being reviewing and verifying provisional ballots, which will be added to the final election tally on Tuesday, Nov. 20. About 3,000 provisional ballots were cast on Election Day. A definitive tally of provisional ballots will be released later this week.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3367Wed, 07 Nov 2012 10:00:00
Most Mail-in Voters Should Have Their BallotVoters who requested a mail-in ballot before Oct. 9 should have their ballots for the upcoming election.

Voters who have not received their mail-in ballot, would like to request one, or have questions about their ballot can email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org or call 303-413-7740. Mail-in ballot requests received since Oct. 9 should be fulfilled in the next week.

Each mailed ballot packet includes a list of ballot drop-off points. A full list is also available at BoulderCountyVotes.org. For most Boulder County voters, postage for returning a ballot will cost 45 cents. However, voters who need to provide a photocopy of their ID with their returned mail ballot should affix 65 cents postage on the envelope. (Only about 3 percent of mail ballot voters fall into the ID-required category.) Postage is also explained on the instruction sheet included with each mail ballot.
 
Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 
  
Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Mail ballots sent to voters who requested them.
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Oct. 30: Last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election if the ballot is mailed.
• Friday, Nov. 2: Last day to request a mail ballot for the General Election if the ballot is picked up at the Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s office.
• Friday, Nov. 2: Last day for early voting.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3347Tue, 23 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Out of Town on Election Day? You Have Options.Boulder County – Planning to be out of town on Election Day? The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office offers several options for travelers, overseas military, college students and others who can’t vote in person on Tuesday, Nov. 6:

  • Vote by mail-in ballot. If you aren’t signed up to vote by mail-in ballot, it’s not too late. Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org soon to request one. Then vote and return it to a drop-off site or Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s office by 7 p.m. on Election Day. 
  • Vote at an early voting location . If you’d prefer not to receive a mail-in ballot but won’t be in town to head to your polling place on Election Day, early voting is a great option. Early voting begins Monday, Oct. 22, at our Boulder and Longmont branch offices. Additional early voting locations will open Oct. 29 in Boulder, Lafayette and Longmont. Early voting runs through Friday, Nov. 2. 
  • Request an overseas/military ballot. If you’ll be out of the country altogether, you can still request a ballot and receive it via snail mail or email – but contact us soon, because mailing a ballot overseas takes extra time. These voters have until Nov. 14 to return their ballots as long as they’re postmarked no later than Nov. 6.

Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to learn more about these options, or call 303-413-7740 for more information. You can also visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to ballot content and learn more about local elections. 

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3334Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Series of Four Boulder County "Election Labs" Open to PublicBoulder County  – The Boulder County Elections Division will host series of “Election Labs” this month to train new judges in helping polling place voters for Election Day. The election labs will simulate what a polling place will look like on Nov. 6. The events will be open to the public, including first-time voters who’d like to know what to expect at their polling place on Election Day. 

Scheduled Locations, Times and Dates:

Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd Street, Boulder
6 - 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17    
5 - 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 

Boulder County Parks & Open Space, 5201 St. Vrain Road, Longmont
4 - 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20  
1 - 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk - 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3333Thu, 11 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Special District Ballot Issues: Boulder County 2012 General ElectionThree special districts are coordinating with Boulder County for the Nov. 6, 2012, general election. Special district elections have slightly different voter eligibility rules. Here’s an explanation and some links to additional information.

Which districts are participating in the Nov. 6 election?

Which voters are eligible to participate?
  1. A resident of the district, for not less than thirty days, registered to vote at an address in the district.
  2. A Colorado registered voter and spouse who owns taxable real or personal property in the district, but does not reside on the property or in the district.
  3. A Colorado registered voter who is obligated to pay taxes under a contract to purchase taxable property within the district, but does not reside on the property or in the district.

How can someone know whether they’re eligible to vote on these issues?

Eligible voters who live in one of these districts will see the special district issue on their regular ballot.

Property owners who live outside the district can contact the Boulder County Elections Division to receive a ballot containing only the special district issue as long as they are registered to vote in Colorado. The mail ballot will arrive in a green envelope to distinguish it from the white ballot envelopes used for standard mail-in ballots. Our office also sent a letter to these voters in late September notifying them they may be eligible to participate in the election.

If you have questions about this, please call us at 303-413-7740 or email Joan Barilla at jbarilla@bouldercounty.org.

What are the boundaries of these special districts?

View the district boundaries on these maps:

Where can a voter read the ballot content for these special district issues and find more information about them?

Who do I contact if I still have questions about obtaining a ballot or need other general election information?
Call, email or visit our main office in Boulder, or visit our website:

- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3329Wed, 10 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to test ballots and equipment for upcoming electionBoulder County  – The Boulder County Elections Division will conduct a logic and accuracy test next week on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2012 general election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public, including representatives of local political parties and the media.

Scheduled Dates and Times: 
10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9;
9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 10, and Thursday, Oct. 11.
(The public may also observe a day of pre-testing preparation on Monday, Oct. 8, beginning at 9 a.m.)

Location: 
Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.

After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org

Boulder County voters can also visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Last day to register to vote for the general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3318Tue, 02 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Deadline Approaching: Tuesday, Oct. 9 is Last Day to Register to VoteBoulder County – If you aren’t registered to vote, you have just one week left to do so if you’d like to cast a ballot in the general election.

Tuesday, Oct. 9, is the last day to register to vote for the Nov. 6 election. 

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections. 

They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3315Mon, 01 Oct 2012 10:00:00
Watch for Voter Information Postcard in Your Mailbox This WeekBoulder County – Voters should check their mailboxes this week for postcards detailing key information on how to cast a ballot in the Nov. 6 general election.

About 175,000 voters in Boulder County will receive the postcards from the Clerk & Recorder’s Office.

For voters who’ve signed up to receive a mail ballot, each postcard gives the voter’s precinct number and tells them to watch for their mail ballot during the week of Oct. 15. About 113,000 Boulder County voters will receive this card.

For polling place voters, the card gives the voter’s precinct number, designated Election Day polling place and details about early voting, which begins the week of Oct. 22. About 62,000 Boulder County voters will receive this card.

Residents who have not registered to vote will not receive a postcard, though they can still register by Oct. 9 and cast a ballot in the election.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration, request a mail-in ballot, view ballot content and learn more about local elections.

They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Last day to register to vote if you want to participate in the Nov. 6 general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours are available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3310Tue, 25 Sep 2012 10:00:00
Statement from Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall on Dismissal of Court CaseBoulder County – U.S. District Judge Christine Arguello this morning dismissed the Citizen Center v. Gessler case, in which Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall had been named as a defendant. The court also denied a related motion for a preliminary injunction that could have prevented Boulder County from printing its ballots as planned for the Nov. 6 general election. The Boulder County Elections Division will proceed with its plan to print ballots.

Clerk Hall offered the following response to the judge’s ruling: 

"We’ve always worked very hard to ensure election integrity in Boulder County. We’ve designed paper ballots that will keep your vote anonymous and allow for efficient, accurate tallying on Election Night. Earlier this year, I helped draft legislation to create a process that lets the public review voted ballots after an election. And Boulder County has one of the most advanced and thorough post-election audits in the U.S. 

"I’m happy the judge’s decision will allow us to continue our work as planned. The dismissal of the case is a relief because it will allow me to devote more of my time to overseeing our preparations for the general election." 

For more on Boulder County’s ballot design and printing process, see Hall’s recent op-ed.

Key Dates for the 2012 General Election:
• Tuesday, Oct. 9: Deadline to register to voter if wish to cast a ballot in the Nov. 6 general election.
• Week of Oct. 15: Ballots will be sent to voters who have requested a mail ballot for the general election or signed up as permanent mail-in voters. 
• Monday, Oct. 22: Early voting begins. Locations and hours available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
• Tuesday, Nov. 6: Election Day. Polling locations will be open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All ballots must be in the hands of the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office by 7 p.m.

- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk




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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3305Fri, 21 Sep 2012 10:00:00
2012 Primary Maps: Results and Turnout by Precinct

To review the data we used to compile these maps, see the 2012 primary Statement of Vote.

2012 Primary Election Results
BoulderCountyVotes.org
On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3224Thu, 19 Jul 2012 10:00:00
Final turnout figures: Boulder County 2012 primaryFinal Turnout
Boulder County Primary Election
June 26, 2012 

Total Turnout:
37,219 ballots tallied / 109,118 active ballots distributed = 34.1 percent turnout

Republican Party:
12,132 ballots tallied / 36,021 active ballots distributed = 33.7 percent turnout

Democratic Party:
25,069 ballots tallied / 72,949 active ballots distributed = 34.4 percent turnout

American Constitution Party:
18 ballots tallied / 148 active ballots distributed = 12.2 percent turnout

2012 Primary Election Results   
BoulderCountyVotes.org
On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3223Thu, 19 Jul 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County's Primary Election Audit Open to PublicBoulder County – The public is invited to observe Boulder County’s enhanced audit for the 2012 primary election beginning Saturday at noon. The audit is a post-election quality assurance test that ensures the accuracy of the machine tally of votes.

Boulder County’s enhanced audit uses randomly selected ballots from all scanning systems and compares a manual tally of votes with the actual election-night machine tally of the same ballots. Any discrepancy is investigated. A final report is issued to the Boulder County Canvass Board for verification before the election is certified.

Members of the public can observe the audit process at the Boulder County Ballot Processing Center, 1750 33rd St., Boulder. Contests and ballot batches will be randomly selected from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Ballots will be manually tallied and compared with machines tallies from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday. The audit will continue from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday or until the test is finished.

Complete audit details and data will be available at BoulderCountyVotes.org by 5 p.m. Friday, July 6.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3187Thu, 28 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Ballot Returns on Pace to Exceed 2010 Primary TurnoutWith our ballot returns at a total of 21,147 ballots through yesterday, we are now ahead of where we were at this point in the 2010 Primary Election

If the ballot returns continue at this rate, we will exceed 2010 primary returns by a small amount. In 2010, we received 48,779 ballots.  If we maintain our current pace, we will be closer to 50,000 ballots returned.  

One unknown factor is the impact of the primary being held in June rather than August.  Does the earlier date cause voters to return their ballot ahead of time as they may be going on vacation? 

A statistic that seems to hold pretty steady is that we receive around 25 percent of our ballots on Election Day. This means we will likely receive 12,500+ ballots on Election Day.  In the 2011 coordinated election we received 24,200+ ballots on Election Day, or about twice as many as our projection for Primary Election Day next Tuesday.

-- Hillary Hall, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3176Wed, 20 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to host primary election open houseBoulder County – Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall will host a primary election open house from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 25, at the Ballot Processing Center, 1750 33rd St. in Boulder.

The event offers people interested in local elections a chance to see how ballots are processed and learn more about Boulder County’s elections procedures. Hall will explain how the mail-ballot primary is being conducted and answer questions. Visitors will be able to observe workers processing early-return ballots for the June 26 primary election. 

This election is being conducted entirely by mail ballot. Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check their registration, view ballot content, find a service center or ballot drop-off site, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 

They can also call 303-413-7740 or email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org for information or visit one of three Boulder County election service centers.
  
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
• Tuesday, June 19: Last day to request a replacement ballot if you’d like to receive it by mail. 
• Monday, June 18, through Tuesday, June 26: Voters requesting a replacement ballot can apply for and receive one in person at one of three service centers. 
• Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3174Tue, 19 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Affiliated Boulder County Voters: You Should Have Your Primary Ballot
Boulder County – Eligible, affiliated voters should have their mail ballots for the 2012 Boulder County primary election.

Voters affiliated with the Democratic, Republican and American Constitution parties may vote in the June 26 primary. Voters who have not received a primary ballot or who have questions about their ballot can email vote@bouldercountyvotes.org or call 303-413-7740.

The June 26 primary election is being conducted entirely by mail ballot. Each mailed ballot packet includes a list of ballot drop-off points and service centers that will open next week.
 
Voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to view ballot content, request a replacement ballot if their ballot is lost or damaged, or find more information about the election. 
  
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
• Tuesday, June 19: Last day to request a replacement ballot if you’d like to receive it by mail. 
• Monday, June 18, through Tuesday, June 26: Voters requesting a replacement ballot can apply for and receive one in person at one of three service centers. 
• Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3163Tue, 12 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Sheriff Pelle Expands Fire BanFROM:            SHERIFF JOE PELLE

REF:                NEW AND ADDITIONAL FIRE RESTRICTIONS

EFFECTIVE:   JUNE 11, 2012 5 P.M.

 

 

Ongoing dry and windy conditions, and Red Flag Warnings on a daily basis, have pushed us into extreme fire danger regionally and county-wide.  Additionally, huge fires in Larimer County, Wyoming, New Mexico, and throughout other parts of the State have strained fire-fighting resources locally and regionally.

 

The forecast shows no signs of immediate relief.

 

With these conditions in mind, we are upgrading our current ban on open-fires.  Effective at 5pm today, there will be no open burning of any kind allowed anywhere in unincorporated Boulder County.  This includes slash piles, agricultural burning, camp fires, bon fires, charcoal grills, etc. regardless of location, (mountains or plains). Only liquid gas or propane fired cooking stoves will be allowed for outdoor use. The use and sale of fireworks is also banned throughout the unincorporated county.

 

Violation of this order may result in a $500 fine for the first offense and escalates with subsequent violations. 

 

Deputies will begin enforcing this resolution tonight, and informing campground hosts, etc. of the new rules while they make their rounds. 
 
-www.BoulderSheriff.org-
 
Reference:  Amended Fire Ban (6/11/12)
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3159Mon, 11 Jun 2012 10:00:00
Equipment testing complete for June 26 primary electionBoulder County – Ballots and equipment to be used in the county’s upcoming mail-ballot primary election passed a required Logic and Accuracy Test held Wednesday and Thursday.

Representatives from the local Democratic and Republican parties took part in testing at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office that confirmed the equipment’s ability to properly read ballots and correctly tabulate votes. 

The LAT also confirmed ballots are properly printed for the election and the equipment is accurately calibrated to process ballots. The test included mail-in, electronic and audio ballots. In all, 3,454 ballots were tested, including 3,379 paper ballots and 75 electronic ballots on voting machines. 
 
Each piece of equipment used during the LAT has been cleared of test votes and reset to zero, ensuring the equipment is ready to count live ballots for the primary election.
 
Results and test records are available for review at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
The June 26 primary election is being conducted by mail ballot. Visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to check your registration or learn more about the election, and call 303-413-7740 or email Vote@BoulderCountyVotes.org if you have questions. 
 
Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:
Friday, May 25: Last day for voters to change or withdraw from party affiliation before the primary.
Tuesday, May 29: Last day to register to vote for the primary election.
Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org
- On Twitter: @BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3131Fri, 25 May 2012 10:00:00
Time running out to change affiliation, register to vote for primary election

Boulder County  – Residents who plan to cast a ballot in the June 26 primary election have just a few days left to change party affiliation or register to vote. 

Republican, Democratic, American Constitution and minor party members who’d like to change their party affiliation before the primary must do so no later than Friday, May 25. Unregistered voters who’d like to register to vote and participate in the primary must do so no later than Tuesday, May 29. 

Unaffiliated voters may affiliate with a party and participate in its primary up to and including Primary Election Day on June 26.

Voters who have moved since the previous election should update their registration if they plan to vote in the primary.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The upcoming primary election will be conducted by mail ballot. Only affiliated voters will receive a ballot. Primary Election Day is June 26, but voters will begin receiving their ballots during the week of June 4. Each ballot packet will include details about expanded Clerk & Recorder’s office hours, election service centers and ballot drop-off sites for the June primary.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3123Fri, 18 May 2012 10:00:00
Deadlines Approaching to Change Affiliation, Register to Vote for PrimaryBoulder County  – Residents who plan to cast a ballot in the June 26 primary election have a few weeks left to change party affiliation or register to vote. 

Republicans, Democrats and American Constitution Party members who’d like to change their party affiliation before the primary must do so no later than Friday, May 25. Unregistered voters who’d like to register to vote and participate in the primary must do so no later than Tuesday, May 29. Voters who have moved since the previous election should update their registration if they plan to vote in the primary.

Boulder County voters can visit BoulderCountyVotes.org to register to vote, check and update their voter registration and view primary ballot content. They can also call 303-413-7740 for more information or visit one of three Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office branches: 1750 33rd St. in Boulder; 529 Coffman St. in Longmont; or 722 Main St. in Louisville. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
 
The upcoming primary election will be conducted by mail ballot. Only affiliated voters will receive a ballot. Primary Election Day is June 26, but voters will begin receiving their ballots during the week of June 4. Each ballot packet will include details about expanded Clerk & Recorder’s office hours, election service centers and ballot drop-off sites for the June primary.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3116Fri, 11 May 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County to Test Ballots and Equipment for Upcoming Primary ElectionBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Elections Division beginning Wednesday, May 23, will conduct a logic and accuracy test on ballots and equipment to be used for the 2012 primary election.

The test ensures equipment properly tabulates votes. Each type of ballot and all ballot styles will be tested to make sure ballots are properly printed and to verify the scanning equipment properly reads ballots. The test will also confirm that scanning equipment settings are properly calibrated for the ballots. Testing is open to the public, including representatives of local political parties and the media.

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, through Friday, May 25 (or until testing concludes). A pre-testing setup day is also open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 22.

Where: Ballot Processing Center, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.

After testing concludes, documentation and results will be available online at BoulderCountyVotes.org

For more elections information, including ballot content for the June 26 primary, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org.

Other Key Dates for the 2012 Primary Election:

  • Friday, May 25: Last day for voters to change or withdraw major party affiliation before the primary.
  • Tuesday, May 29: Last day to register to vote for the primary election.
  • Tuesday, June 26: Primary Election Day. Ballots must be in hands of Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office no later than 7 p.m.

-BoulderCountyVotes.org-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3113Monday, May 08, 2012
Boulder County to Conduct 2012 Primary Election by Mail Ballot

Boulder County – The Board of County Commissioners today approved Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall’s plan to conduct a mail ballot election with service centers for the 2012 primary election. 

Boulder County’s Elections Division examined several factors to decide how to conduct this year’s June 26 primary election, including voting method preferences in Boulder County, turnout, costs, and comments received from the public. 

The county conducted its first mail-ballot primary in 2010, and has conducted odd-year elections by mail ballot since 2001. Election officials estimate they saved $180,000 by conducting the 2010 primary as an all-mail ballot election rather than a polling place election.

The 2010 primary also saw an increase in voter turnout consistent with mail ballot elections. Turnout grew from 29 percent in the 2008 polling place primary to 43 percent in the 2010 mail ballot primary. 

Of about 97,000 active registered voters affiliated with a political party in Boulder County, about 67,000 have signed up as permanent mail-in voters. Of the roughly 145,000 active registered voters in Boulder County, about 95,000 are PMIVs.

Primary ballots will be mailed beginning June 4. Several service centers will be available in Boulder County from June 18-26 for voters to vote in person, update their registration, drop off voted ballots or request replacement ballots.

The deadline for affiliated voters to change their affiliation to vote in the primary election, or to withdraw their affiliation, is May 25. The deadline to register to vote is May 29.

Voters can check their registration information at BoulderCountyVotes.org to verify update their registration, address information and affiliation. 

- www.BoulderCountyVotes.org

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=3005Thu, 16 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Frequently Asked Questions: Caucuses in Boulder CountyWith the 2012 political caucuses just around the corner, we've been taking calls from voters who want to know how to identify their new precinct number, where to find updated precinct maps and how to find more info about a party's caucus. Here are some answers to the most common questions we’ve received:

How do I figure out my precinct number?

Check your voter information on our website. You can also call the Boulder County Elections Division at 303-413-7740 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Where can I find maps of Boulder County’s precincts?

Maps of updated precinct boundaries are also available on our website.

I'm a Republican. How do I figure out where to go for my party's local caucus on Tuesday, Feb. 7?

Contact the local party leadership:

Boulder County Republican Party
Chairperson: Joel T Champion
Phone: 303-775-1103
Email:  joel@bouldercountygop.org
Web: http://bouldercountygop.org/

The Democratic Party and American Constitution Party hold their caucuses on Tuesday, March 6. Where can I find information about their caucuses?

Boulder County Democratic Party 
Chairperson: Dan Gould
Phone: 303-442-3423
Email:  office@bocodems.org
Website: http://bocodems.org

American Constitution Party
Chairperson: Douglas Campbell
Phone: 1-877-VOTE-ACP
Email: info@americanconstitutionparty.com
Website: www.americanconstitutionparty.com

For more elections information, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org or follow the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder's Office on Twitter.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2992Mon, 06 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County statement on oil and gas drilling from Commissioners Cindy Domenico, Will Toor and Deb Gardner:Boulder County, Colo. – Boulder County is concerned about the potential for significantly expanded oil and gas drilling within the county, and supports appropriate, tighter restrictions on drilling and increased local control to mitigate the impacts of these activities.

However, Boulder County and other local governments in Colorado do not have complete authority to regulate drilling. In order to ensure both our Comprehensive Plan and Land Use regulations are as thorough and up-to-date as possible, today we approved a temporary moratorium on the processing of the required development plans for local oil and gas permits under the county Land Use Code (Resolution 2012-16). This will give us time to make sure that, within the limits of our legal authority, we are able to mitigate local impacts from these activities and to maximize protection for the people and environment of Boulder County.

Boulder County does not voluntarily allow oil and gas drilling on its open space properties. Like many private landowners, we often do not own the rights to a given property’s oil and gas deposits. In other cases, the mineral rights were leased prior to acquisition of the land by the county. In those instances, the county does not have the ability to prohibit drilling, even though it is the surface landowner. As the surface owner, we do negotiate surface use agreements prior to drilling, and in doing so, we attempt to minimize those impacts to the maximum extent possible.

Through our Land Use Code, we do have some local authority over oil and gas drilling on private and public land; however, substantial authority for regulation of oil and gas operations lies with the state and federal governments, so there are limits on what we can restrict. For instance, it is unlikely that Boulder County could simply prohibit hydraulic fracturing on either public or private land in the county.

Boulder County has and is actively supporting efforts to strengthen state regulation, and to expand local authority in the area of oil and gas drilling. We supported legislation signed by former Gov. Bill Ritter to strengthen oil and gas rules and to reform the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. We have also advocated for a stronger disclosure requirements of fracking fluids, although the COGCC ultimately approved requirements that did not include our requests for a process that would allow any leaks to be traced, nor for pre- and post-drilling water monitoring. Finally, we are supportive of legislation that Rep. Matt Jones of Louisville is sponsoring in the 2012 General Assembly to expand local authority over drilling.

We also authorized staff to set a public hearing for Thursday, March 1 to take public testimony on the local impacts associated with oil and gas development, and on the appropriateness of continuing or amending the temporary moratorium on the processing of land use applications for oil and gas development which we approved today. This meeting will begin at 4 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room on the third floor of the Boulder County Courthouse at 1325 Pearl St. in Boulder. Staff from several county departments will be making presentations regarding our current regulations and the development we have seen on our open space properties.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2986Thu, 02 Feb 2012 10:00:00
Elections Division Seeks Input on Proposed Mail Ballot Primary ElectionBoulder County – The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is collecting public comments on its proposal to conduct the June 26 primary election by mail ballot.

Members of the public who want to offer feedback can email their comments to Boulder County’s Elections Division at vote@bouldercountyvotes.org. The matter is tentatively scheduled to go before the Board of County Commissioners for approval on Thursday, Feb. 16. Please send written comments no later than Monday, Feb. 13.

Boulder County conducted its 2010 primary election, as well as its November 2011 coordinated election, by mail ballot. The November 2012 general election will use polling places as well as mail ballots.

- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2980Fri, 27 Jan 2012 10:00:00
Boulder County Precinct Boundary Changes ApprovedBoulder County -- The Board of County Commissioners this morning voted 2-0 to approve updates to the county’s precinct lines and political district maps.

Boulder County’s Elections Division and Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall developed the new map to reflect redistricting decisions made at the state level in 2011. The updates take into account new boundaries for the county’s U.S. House, Colorado Senate and Colorado House representative districts.

The new precinct map will be used for the 2012 election cycle.

As part of the update, the Elections Division staff also introduced a new numbering system that labels precincts geographically. They’re separated into nine categories by municipality or region to make precinct data easier to sort. For example, all Boulder precincts are numbered in the 800s while Longmont’s are in the 600s.

A copy of this morning’s presentation by Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall, which includes details about the new numbering system, is available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2955Tue, 03 Jan 2012 10:00:00
FAQ: Redistricting in Boulder CountyWhat is redistricting? Who makes decisions about redistricting?

Redistricting refers to the proportional adjustment of district boundaries for U.S. House, State Senate and State House districts based on population changes documented by the most recent U.S. Census.

Most decisions on redistricting are made at the state level. The state’s General Assembly handles redistricting for the U.S. House seats while the Colorado Reapportionment Commission draws new lines for State House and State Senate seats.  Colorado’s state government has a helpful website explaining more about the criteria and process at the state level.

What role does Boulder County's Elections Division play in redistricting?  

After state leaders finalize new district maps, the process moves to Colorado’s counties. Our role is to implement the new district lines at the local level – to make sure Boulder County residents are in the correct State Senate, State House and U.S House district based on the new maps.

How will this affect voters?    

For most voters, precinct boundaries and representatives will remain the same. About 40 of the 234 precincts will likely see boundary changes that affect voters. In a handful of cases we’ve substantially redrawn a precinct’s boundaries based on recent redistricting decisions.
 
Additionally, some of Boulder County’s online voter lookup services will be offline for a few days while we update our database to reflect the new district boundaries. That information should be available again on Jan. 4.
 
Will I be notified if there’s a change in which elected official represents me?
 
Voters who are moved into new U.S. House, State House or State Senate districts as part of redistricting will be notified by mail in late January.

Which districts are affected by the shifting boundaries?    

Boulder County retained the same U.S. House, State House and State Senate districts. However, the boundaries of each district have changed. Here’s a list of Boulder County's districts:
  • U.S. House of Representatives:  2nd and 4th Congressional Districts
  • Colorado Senate: Districts 16, 17 and 18
  • Colorado House of Representatives: Districts 10, 11, 12, 13 and 33

Will the precinct numbers change as part of this process?

Boulder County’s precinct numbers for the next decade will be similar to the layout from the previous decade. There will be a handful of new precincts.

Where can I get more information about redistricting in Boulder County?

Review our information packet, which we'll post on Thursday, Dec. 29. You can also attend a Boulder County commissioners hearing on this matter on Tuesday, Jan. 3.

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BoulderCountyVotes.org
Twitter: @BoCoClerk
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2946Thu, 22 Dec 2011 10:00:00
2011 Coordinated Election Turnout: FinalFinal turnout figures for the final unofficial results of Boulder County’s 2011 Coordinated Election:

City of Boulder
54,806 eligible voters
27,001 ballots counted
49.27% turnout
 
City of Lafayette
14,175 eligible voters
5,740 ballots counted
40.49% turnout

City of Longmont 
44,497 eligible voters
22,258 ballots counted
50.02% turnout

City of Louisville
12,171 eligible voters 
6,241 ballots counted
51.28% turnout

Boulder Valley School District – Boulder County portion
111,002 eligible voters 
52,634 ballots counted
47.42% turnout

St. Vrain Valley School District – Boulder County portion
59,608 eligible voters 
29,550 ballots counted
49.57% turnout

Total for Boulder County
171,180 eligible voters with standard ballots
1,821 property-owner-only ballots distributed
173,001 total ballots 
82,501 standard ballots counted
83,573 total ballots counted 
48.82% turnout
 
More results and election information: BoulderCountyVotes.org 


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2950Wed, 21 Dec 2011 10:00:00
Caucus affiliation deadlines approachingBoulder County, Colo. – Deadlines are already approaching for voters who want to switch party affiliation before caucuses are held during the 2012 election cycle.

Registered voters who want to participate in the Republican Party caucus, to be held Feb. 7, 2012, must affiliate with the GOP no later than Wednesday, Dec. 7. They can do so by updating their voter information at BoulderCountyVotes.org or calling the Boulder County Elections Division at 303-413-7740.

Registered Republican voters who’ve moved recently must update their voter information by Monday, Jan. 9, to participate in the GOP caucus. First-time voters, such as naturalized citizens or those who turn 18 before Feb. 7, must register no later than Jan. 9 if they want to participate in the Republican caucus.

Registered voters who want to affiliate with the Democratic Party or American Constitution Party, both of which will hold caucuses on March 6, have until Friday, Jan. 6, to affiliate.

First-time voters and members of those parties who’ve moved recently must update their voter information by Monday, Feb. 6, to participate in the Democratic or American Constitution caucuses on March 6.
 
Each political party organizes and conducts its own caucus. For more information about a party’s caucus, contact local party leaders.

For more election information, visit BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- www.BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2923Thu, 01 Dec 2011 10:00:00
Boulder County 2011 Election Results Now OfficialBoulder County – The final, official results from Boulder County’s 2011 coordinated election are available now at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
The final official results include the statement of vote, a document that shows precinct-by-precinct results for every issue on Boulder County ballots this year. The statement of vote will be forwarded to the Colorado Secretary of State’s office to become part of the official statewide election record.
 
Earlier this week, elections staff completed the 2011 election audit, a post-election quality assurance test that ensures the accuracy of the machine tally of votes. Boulder County’s enhanced audit uses randomly selected ballots from all scanning systems and compares a manual tally of votes with the actual election-night machine tally of the same ballots. Any discrepancy is investigated. A final report is issued to the Boulder County Canvass Board for verification prior to election certification.
 
The Boulder County Canvass Board on Tuesday certified the election and signed off on the audit. This year’s Canvass Board consisted of Boulder County Clerk and Recorder Hillary Hall, Longmont City Clerk Valeria Skitt and Boulder City Clerk Alisa Lewis.

More election information is available at BoulderCountyVotes.org.
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2912Fri, 18 Nov 2011 10:00:00
UPDATED: Boulder County 2011 Coordinated Election ResultsBoulder County - The Boulder County Clerk and Recorder’s Office added 849 ballots tonight to the unofficial 2011 coordinated election results at BoulderCountyVotes.org. This increases the total number of ballots tallied for the election to 83,573, up from 82,724.
 
Election results remain unofficial until the Boulder County Canvass Board certifies the abstract of votes cast, due Friday, Nov. 18.
 
The updated tally includes ballots from overseas voters as well as voters who needed to add or confirm a signature on their mail-ballot envelope or provide ID for their ballot to be counted. All of the ballots were voted on or before Election Day on Nov. 1.
 
Under state law, voters who needed to cure their ballots had until the close of business today to do so. The Elections Division last week sent these voters instructions on how to make sure their ballots were included in the final tally. Overseas military and other voters living abroad had until 4:30 p.m. today for their ballots to be in the hands of the Elections Division as long as the return envelopes were postmarked no later than Nov. 1.
 
Election results are undergoing an audit this week. The Canvass Board review and final certification are set for next week. 
 
- BoulderCountyVotes.org -
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2899Wed, 09 Nov 2011 10:00:00
Remaining Ballots Will Be Tallied TonightAs we noted last week, a few hundred ballots still need to be tallied and added to the unofficial results for the 2011 coordinated election. Tonight we'll tally the outstanding ballots, which include ballots from overseas voters and ballots that need to be cured.
 
All ballots that need to be cured are due by 4:30 p.m. today at our Elections Division office, 1750 33rd St., Boulder.
 
We'll begin tallying the remaining ballots at about 5 p.m. at the Ballot Processing Center, also at 1750 33rd St. in Boulder. The tally is open to the public. If you'd like to attend, please use the entrance at the far east end of the building.
 
We plan to post the updated results at BoulderCountyVotes.org around 8 p.m., so keep an eye on our Twitter feed tonight.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2897Wed, 09 Nov 2011 10:00:00
2011 Coordinated Election TurnoutTurnout figures for the final unofficial results of Boulder County’s 2011 Coordinated Election:

City of Boulder
54,809 ballots distributed
26,626 ballots counted
48.58% turnout

City of Lafayette
14,173 ballots distributed
5,700 ballots counted
40.22% turnout

City of Longmont
44,494 ballots distributed
22,132 ballots counted
49.74% turnout

City of Louisville
12,170 ballots distributed
6,206 ballots counted
50.99% turnout

Boulder Valley School District – Boulder County portion
110,993 ballots distributed
52,069 ballots counted
46.91% turnout

St. Vrain Valley School District – Boulder County portion
59,604 ballots distributed
29,373 ballots counted
49.28% turnout

Total for Boulder County
171,167 standard ballots distributed
1,821 property owner only ballots distributed
172,988 total ballots distributed
82,724 total ballots counted
47.82% turnout
 
More results and election information: BoulderCountyVotes.org
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2888Wed, 02 Nov 2011 10:00:00
Local pregnancy-prevention program earns prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grantBoulder County, CO –Boulder County Public Health recently received a $500,000 matching grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to support the GENESISTER/Women’s Health Collaborative. The GENESISTER program, developed in collaboration with the Boulder Valley Women’s Health Center, takes a new approach to preventing adolescent pregnancy by working with girls whose teenage sisters are already parenting.

Out of 181 applicants nationwide for the 2011 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Local Funding Partnerships (LFP) awards, only 10 programs were chosen to receive LFP matching grants. Local funding partners contributing to the required matching dollars include the Community Foundation of Boulder County, the Rose Community Foundation, the Temple Hoyne Buell Foundation and the Virginia W. Hill Foundation.

“GENESISTER offers an innovative, holistic model to reduce adolescent pregnancy by addressing the influence of having a parenting sister on the younger sibling,” said Leticia Peguero, LFP deputy director. “We were also impressed that the project is culturally responsive with bilingual, bicultural staff and plans to include the girls’ parents in family-centered programs.”

An adolescent girl is 2-to-6 times more likely to become pregnant if her sister is a teenage mother, compared to peers who are not siblings of teen parents. The GENESISTER program engages these girls in learning through community service and works with them to reduce school dropout rates and delay sexual activity.

“The program is not just about sex education,” said Jody Scanlon, Program Manager of GENESIS, the county’s program for pregnant and parenting teens. “It’s about giving kids hope for the future. We’re taking a comprehensive approach to address the underlying social issues—helping youth to engage in their communities so they can envision a rewarding future and, thus, have compelling reasons to avoid early childbearing.”

Despite recent gains in teen pregnancy prevention, it remains a significant concern in Boulder County. GENESISTER is available to all Boulder County youth who have a sibling who is a teen parent.

The Boulder Valley Women’s Health Center is an important partner to the GENESISTER program and is collaborating with Boulder County Public Health to provide participants with age-appropriate, medically accurate comprehensive sexual health education individually and in the St. Vrain Valley School District.  Recognizing that teen pregnancy is often the result of intergenerational family patterns, GENESISTER together with Women’s Health will offer parent interventions as well, including helping families to engage in open and honest discussions about sex, relationships, and contraception.

With Boulder County Public Health’s implementation of the GENESIS Program in 1989, and the development of Women’s Health Teen Clinic in 1995, Boulder County has made a significant impact on teen pregnancy rates, resulting in a 46.8% reduction between 1991 and 2008. 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2807Fri, 16 Sep 2011 10:00:00
Who's on Boulder County ballots in the 2011 election?The Elections Division is working this week to finalize the content that will go before county voters in the upcoming mail ballot election. We’ve received a few requests for a complete list of all issues and races that will appear on various ballots. We’ll have that document ready and available at BoulderCountyVotes.org early next week.

In the meantime, here’s a rundown of the local municipalities and districts that will have races or issues on the Nov. 1 ballot.

• Boulder County
• City of Boulder 
• City of Louisville 
• City of Longmont
• City of Lafayette
• Boulder Valley School District 
• Park School District R-3
• St. Vrain Valley School District
• Thompson School District R2-J 
• Rocky Mountain Fire Protection District 
• Coal Creek Canyon Park and Recreation District   

For more information on individual races, please contact individual districts or municipalities.

BoulderCountyVotes.org
BoulderCounty.org/Clerk
@BoCoClerk

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2793Thu, 08 Sep 2011 10:00:00
Boulder County has first approved syringe exchange program in stateBoulder County – On May 9, 2011, the Boulder County Board of Health passed a resolution approving the Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) syringe exchange program - making the program the first approved syringe exchange program in Colorado. 
In 2010, Colorado lawmakers created an exemption in Colorado’s drug paraphernalia law allowing counties to adopt syringe exchange programs through a local approval process. 

“We have known for over 20 years that providing access to clean syringes and encouraging testing and treatment is one of the most effective evidence-based practices to stop the spread of infectious diseases,” said Jeff Zayach, BCPH Executive Director.

“Study after study has found that syringe access programming helps reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases without encouraging or increasing drug use. In fact, this type of programming provides opportunities to reduce drug use.”

In March 1989, only eight years after the first cases of HIV were identified, the Boulder County Public Health HIV/STI Outreach Program started the Works Program, a comprehensive needle exchange, treatment, and harm reduction program – making Boulder the third city in the United States to offer syringe access programming for drug users.

Since then, collaboration between local law enforcement, the Boulder County district attorney’s office, and BCPH has helped to reduce the spread of infectious disease, keep needles off our streets and out of our waterways, increased testing for HIV/AIDS, and increased treatment among injecting drug users.

“It has been a very long time coming, but we are incredibly grateful for the opportunity to operate under full legal protection, not just at a local level, but at a state level as well,” said Carol Helwig, BCPH HIV/STI Outreach Program Coordinator.

“When we legitimize the services that prevent the spread of infectious diseases, and ultimately link people to the resources they need to lead a healthier life, we are a little bit closer to social justice for the most marginalized among us.”

For more information, contact Carol Helwig at 303.413.7522 or visit www.BoulderCountyHealth.org.
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2633Tue, 10 May 2011 10:00:00
Partners help to improve equity, self-esteem, and healthBoulder, Colo. – As budgets are cut and the economy continues to waver, partnership has become even more important in the effort to help Boulder County residents and visitors stay healthy and safe. On Thursday, April 7, Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) will honor three community partners for their exemplary work in improving the health and environment of Boulder County.

This year’s award recipients are Rev. Rick King, United Church of Christ, Longmont; The Boulder Valley Teen Parenting Program-Arapahoe Ridge; and Morgan Rogers, The Community Foundation. 

Rev. Rick King, United Church of Christ, Longmont has been on the forefront of creating equity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and questioning (LGBTIQ) residents in the Longmont area. In September 1999, his church adopted the “open and affirming” position, and in January 2010, the church completed an adult education class to debunk myths about biblical passages often used to exclude gays from worship. The church has publicly declared their full welcome and inclusion of LGBT people in local newspapers, on prominent signs, and in ongoing outreach. 

King has also been instrumental in creating the Safe Schools Coalition for the St. Vrain Valley School District, working to help the district implement comprehensive LGBTIQ and anti-bullying trainings.

“Due to Rev. King’s work, there are now other churches in the Longmont area that are beginning conversations about what it means to be open and affirming places of worship,” said Melissa Marsh, BCPH OASOS (Open and Affirming Sexual Orientation and gender identity Support) program coordinator. “He recognizes the health disparities that LGBTIQ youth face in their schools and in the community, as well as the important role the church plays in making sure that Longmont is a safe place to live, work, and go to school for everyone.”

The Boulder Valley Teen Parenting Program – Arapahoe Ridge helps students build self-esteem and provides them with a support system. Along with schoolwork, they teach teen parents pre- and postnatal care; childbirth; maternal and infant health; and nutrition and parenting skills. About 66% of participants have completed high school or earned a GED or vocational certificate.

“The entire staff – from the program director to the classroom teachers – cares deeply about the children and new parents,” said Jody Scanlon, BCPH GENESIS and GENESISTER (teen pregnancy and parenting) program manager. “The Boulder Valley School District has provided tremendous support to the district's teen parent population, and because of this, these teens are beating the odds.”
 
Morgan Rogers, The Community Foundation, has dedicated her career with The Community Foundation to improving the health and wellness of all people and the environment in Boulder County. Rogers developed the Boulder County Trends Report that tracks 50 indicators of the health of the community and helps partners to develop strategies to improve health.

Morgan was also instrumental in developing, implementing, funding, and coordinating the Boulder County Health Information Exchange, an important tool that will improve health care providers’ access to critical health information, improve the quality of treatment for their patients, and improve chronic health conditions. 

“Because of Morgan’s work, we have been selected as one of two statewide pilots to implement health information exchange,” said Jeff Zayach, BCPH executive director.  “People from the national level are watching our progress, and Morgan was key in moving us forward.”

The Healthy Community Awards, developed in 2006, recognizes individuals and groups in the Boulder County community that address public health needs and issues. Up to three awards are given annually, and each recipient must have demonstrated the BCPH mission and values in an exemplary way and developed and implemented strategies to improve the health and well-being of the people and environment in Boulder County.

A BCPH employee must nominate community members or organizations, and a review committee of public health leaders selects award recipients.

This year’s awards will be presented at a reception from 2 to 4 p.m., April 7, at 3482 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2583Thu, 31 Mar 2011 10:00:00
Business, academia, and public health work together to make food safe.Two Boulder County food facilities were recognized on January 19, 2011, for going above and beyond minimum food safety regulations to keep consumers safe. The facilities, Pizza Hut at 2255 N. Main Street in Longmont and Subway at 1335 South Boulder Road in Louisville, became the newest members of the Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) Partners for Food Safety program.
 
Rather than focusing mainly on inspections, the program emphasizes collaboration, training, and recognition to improve food safety.

“It’s a new way of thinking about food safety,” said Marshall Lipps, BCPH environmental health specialist. “The program’s based on partnership and incentives rather than the traditional punitive model.”

The program is voluntary and was developed by the Food Safety Advisory Committee (FSAC), a partnership of industry, academia, and public health, in 2009. The program now boasts over 40 members.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 out of 6 Americans (48 million people) becomes sick from a foodborne illness every year. Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die.

To find out more about the program, visit www.BoulderCountyFood.org, and click on “Partners for Food Safety.” To receive updates about FSAC, email Marshall Lipps at mlipps@bouldercounty.org.

-END-

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2515Fri, 28 Jan 2011 10:00:00
Unattended DeathCase Report 10-6573
 
On December 12, 2010, at approximately 8:06 a.m., Deputies with the Boulder County Sheriff's Office, along with members of the Boulder Rural Fire Protection District and Pridemark Paramedics responded to the 200 Blk. of Green Rock Drive in unincorporated Boulder County, Colorado on the report of a female who was unconscious and not breathing. CPR was attempted on the vicitm, but was unsuccessful.
 
The name of the deceased is being withheld pending notification of the next of kin. Boulder County Sheriff's Detectives and Boulder County Coroner's Office are investigating but foul play is not suspected.
 
Sergeant Lori L. Cox #529
(303)-441-3622  
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2476Sun, 12 Dec 2010 10:00:00
Businesses only need 10 minutes to learn how to protect the environmentThe Partners for a Clean Environment (PACE) Program aims to teach businesses how to minimize environmental impacts in just 10 minutes. As part of a new PACE Allies program, an online training has been designed to train businesses that do any sort of outdoor cleanup, such as pressure washing.

“Nothing but rain to the drain” is the mantra for Janice Lopitz, Boulder County Public Health (BCPH) coordinator for the Keep It Clean Partnership (KICP). “I say this to emphasize the fact that everything that goes down a storm drain runs straight to our streams and rivers, without treatment or filtration.”

Seemingly innocuous activities like pressure washing a restaurant patio can carry harmful chemicals and debris into our waterways and significantly impact our water quality.

“Learning to protect our water is simple. Just complete the 10-minute online training and answer 10 test questions,” said Bill Hayes, BCPH environmental health specialist and PACE Program team leader. “It’s so simple, and can make such a tremendous difference.”

Businesses who subcontract functions, like cleaning a building’s exterior, can make sure they’re taking steps to protect the environment too. The PACE Allies program will provide businesses with a list of PACE Allies – service providers that understand and are trained to follow practices that minimize the environmental impacts of these kinds of activities.

The training is available at www.PACEpartners.com. Those who pass the test will be contact to schedule a time for PACE staff to observe their work. They will then be added to the “PACE Allies” list posted on the PACE website and shared with businesses throughout Boulder County. 

PACE will follow up with each Ally annually to ensure that they are continuing to properly implement best management practices (BMPs) and to provide them with any new BMPs or information about emerging technologies.

PACE is pleased to recognize the following Allies:
Wash On Wheels
www.washonwheels.net
3340 S. Quivas St.
Englewood, CO 80110
303-937-7181

X-stream Clean
www.x-streamclean.com
P.O. Box 19371
Boulder, CO 80308
303-579-1388

Rush Management
www.rushmanagement.com
1801 S 120th St .
Lafayette, CO 80026-9509
303-444-2841

For more information about PACE, please visit www.PACEpartners.com or call 303.783.PACE (7223). 

For more information about KICP, please visit www.KeepItCleanPartnership.org.

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=2416Thu, 28 Oct 2010 10:00:00
Recount of Boulder County Question 1D completeBoulder County, Colo. – The Boulder County Elections Division has completed recounting 63,275 ballots for Boulder County Question 1D. The measure, which extends the term limits for the District Attorney to a maximum of three terms, passed by nine votes.

Final recount results for Boulder County Question 1D are 29,966 votes in favor of the measure and 29,957 votes against the measure.

Representatives of the Boulder County canvass board certified the final results of the recount at 2 p.m. on Friday, November 20.

“The purpose of the recount is to ensure that every vote that should have been counted was included in the results,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “We are confident that with the processes we have in place we have accomplished this goal.”

Five votes changed during the recount for a net difference of three votes. These five vote changes can be explained by the following:

  • During the recount process two ‘yes’ votes were determined to be undervotes.
  • Three other votes (two ‘yes’ votes and one ‘no’ vote) were deemed overvotes by the recount resolution teams due to a lack of  clarity of the voter’s intent. 
  • Undervotes and overvotes cannot be counted.

Final results for the contest are available online at www.VoteBoulder.org.

-END-

Contact: Jessie Cornelius 303-413-7766
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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=1924Fri, 20 Nov 2009 10:00:00
Official results for the 2009 Coordinated Election are available onlineBoulder County, Colo. - The Boulder County canvass board certified the results of the 2009 Coordinated Election on Monday and a mandatory recount of Boulder County Question 1D will commence on Tuesday.

The canvass board, which was comprised of representatives of the entities coordinating in the election, signed paperwork at 11 a.m. Monday certifying the election results. During the canvass, the board verified the number of ballots counted in the election and ensured they did not exceed the number of people who voted. A total of 63,320 ballots were cast in this year’s election. The canvass board also conducted a review of the audit report to ensure the election results were accurate.

Boulder County completed verifying the machine tally of votes on Friday during its enhanced election audit. The audit included examining 20 contests on this year’s ballot that had close margins of victory, including Boulder County Question 1D and the Boulder County Nederland Community Library District Ballot Issue 5B.

“We manually counted 22,139 votes for the audit and compared them to election night results to ensure the accuracy of the election night totals,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “I want to thank my staff and the audit board for their diligent work during this process.”

The election results have determined the need for a mandatory recount of all ballots cast that include Boulder County Ballot Question 1D, where the difference of ‘yes’ and ‘no’ votes was a total of 12. The threshold for a mandatory recount in that contest was 150 votes or less. The margins in all other contests are wide enough that a mandatory recount will not be required.

The recount of Boulder County Question 1D will begin on Tuesday with a pretest of the scanning equipment. During this test, election officials will scan four batches of 150 ballots through each of the four scanners used during the election. The machine tally of votes will be compared with a manual tally of votes. If the tallies match, the recount will proceed by scanning all 63,275 ballots that include Boulder County Question 1D.

If there are any discrepancies in the pretest results that cannot be explained by voter error, the Elections Division will conduct a manual recount of all ballots cast that include Boulder County Question 1D.

Members of the press and public are welcome to observe the recount process. The recount will be conducted at the Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office in Boulder, 1750 33rd St. Contact Jessie Cornelius for details at 303-413-7766 or e-mail jcornelius@bouldercounty.org.

Official election results can be viewed at www.VoteBoulder.org.
-BoulderCounty.org-

Contact: Jessie Cornelius, 303-413-7766


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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=1917Mon, 16 Nov 2009 10:00:00
Collector vehicles are now defined as model years 1975 and older(Boulder County, Colo.) - A new state law that becomes effective on September 1, will require vehicles to have a model year of 1975 and older in order to be eligible to register for a “Collector Vehicle” license plate. Collector vehicles were previously defined as those 25 years and older.

Vehicles with a model year of 1976 and newer that already display “Collector Vehicle” license plates will be allowed to maintain their plate status as long as the registration is renewed on time. If the registration expires on models 1976 and newer, the vehicles will be required to pass an emissions test and will be registered with standard license plates. Additionally, if a vehicle with a model year of 1976 and newer is sold to a new owner, it will no longer qualify for the “Collector Vehicle” license plate.

The Boulder County Motor Vehicle Division has sent letters to vehicle owners who could be immediately impacted by the new law. Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed Senate Bill 09-003 into law on June 1, which changed the definition of collector vehicles.

If you have any questions, please contact the Motor Vehicle Division at 303-413-7710 or email motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org

-END-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=1796Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:00:00
Colorado's motor vehicle registration fees increase beginning July 1, 2009Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

Effective July 1, 2009, a new State law will begin increasing Colorado's motor vehicle registration fees over a three-year period. The new fees will be based on a vehicle’s weight and are in addition to all other registration fees.

Vehicle registration fees will increase each year by the following amounts:

For any vehicle weighing 2,000 pounds or less, which includes motorcycles and small trailers:
• $22.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $25.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $29.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing between 2,001-5,000 pounds, which includes most cars, SUVs, and light trucks:
• $32.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $36.50: July 2010 – June 2011
• $41.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 5,001-10,000 pounds, which includes most large trucks and large SUVs:
• $39.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $45.25: July 2010 – June 2011
• $51.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 10,001-16,000 pounds, which includes most passenger buses:
• $51.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $58.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $66.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing more than 16,000 pounds, which includes most commercial trucks:
• $55.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $63.00: July 2010 – June 2011
• $71.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

The new law already requires Colorado residents to pay an additional $25 each month they are late to register their vehicle. Late fees may not exceed $100. Permits are also subject to late fees.

The registration fees and late fee increases are mandated by the FASTER bill (Senate Bill 09-108), which Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed into law on Monday, March 2. For complete details on the bill, visit Senate Bill 09-108. All funds generated from the fees will be used to maintain Colorado roads and bridges.

If you have any questions, please contact the Motor Vehicle Division at 303.413.7710 or email motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org.

-END-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=1714Thu, 18 Jun 2009 10:00:00
Increased Motor Vehicle fees phase in beginning June 1, 2009Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

A new Colorado State law will increase Motor Vehicle late fees to $25 a month beginning June 1, 2009. Registration fees will also increase beginning July 1, 2009. Funds generated from the fees will be used to maintain Colorado roads and bridges.  

Colorado residents will now be required to pay an additional $25 for each month their vehicle’s registration is late. The late fees may not exceed $100.

“We would like Boulder County residents to be aware of these costs, especially the late fees imposed by the new State law,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “I hope residents will be able to avoid some of these costs by renewing their registrations on time.”

Motor Vehicle registration fees will also increase over a three-year period beginning July 1, as part of the legislation’s road and bridge safety surcharges. All registration fee increases are based on a vehicle’s weight.

Vehicle registration fees will increase each year by the following amounts:

For any vehicle weighing 2,000 pounds or less, which includes motorcycles and small trailers:
• $22.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $25.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $29.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing between 2,001-5,000 pounds, which includes most cars, SUVs, and light trucks:
• $32.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $36.50: July 2010 – June 2011
• $41.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 5,001-10,000 pounds, which includes most large trucks and large SUVs:
• $39.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $45.25: July 2010 – June 2011
• $51.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing 10,001-16,000 pounds, which includes most passenger buses:
• $51.50: July 2009 – June 2010
• $58.75: July 2010 – June 2011
• $66.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

For vehicles weighing more than 16,000 pounds, which includes most commercial trucks:
• $55.00: July 2009 – June 2010
• $63.00: July 2010 – June 2011
• $71.00: July 2011 and each year thereafter

The late fees and registration fee increases are mandated by the FASTER bill (Senate Bill 09-108), which Colorado Governor Bill Ritter signed into law on Monday, March 2. For complete details on the bill, visit Senate Bill 09-108.

-End-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=1677Fri, 15 May 2009 10:00:00
Boulder County Motor Vehicle launches convenient online tool to estimate registration fees.Contact: Jessie Cornelius, Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Public Affairs Specialist: 303-413-7766.

(Boulder County, Colo.) - Boulder County residents can now calculate an estimate of their registration fees for newly purchased cars or light trucks on the Boulder County Motor Vehicle Web site. Boulder County’s new tool is one of the first of its kind in the State of Colorado.

“The calculator is intended to help members of the public budget for their registration fees,” said Boulder County Clerk & Recorder Hillary Hall. “Fees still need to be confirmed and paid by visiting our office but this will at least give an idea of the costs.”

The public can visit the Motor Vehicle Fee Estimation Calculator at http://www.bouldercounty.org/register/motorvehicle/pages/mvfeecalc.aspx. A registration fee estimate can be obtained by providing the following information:
•        Year of the Vehicle
•        Vehicle Type
•        Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) or Vehicle Taxable Value
•        Fuel Type
•        Vehicle Weight
•        Purchase Date
•        Registration Date
A Title Complete Notice with the necessary information is sent to residents upon purchase of a vehicle. Vehicle information can also be obtained from a licensed auto dealer. Users should read the site’s Term Definition Guidelines carefully before entering calculation data.

“Motor Vehicle registration costs are calculated by several factors," said Hall. “As long as accurate data is provided online, the estimate should be very close to the registration fee.”

Newly purchased vehicles must be registered in person in the County in which you reside in the State of Colorado. Registrations can be completed in Boulder County at any of the Motor Vehicle branch office locations:
•        1750 33rd Street, Boulder
•        529 Coffman Street, Longmont
•        722 Main Street, Louisville

The Boulder County Clerk & Recorder’s Office is encouraging residents to email their feedback on the calculator to motorvehicle@bouldercounty.org. Registrations can be renewed online by visiting http://www.bouldercounty.org/register/motorvehicle

-END-

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=1672Thu, 07 May 2009 10:00:00
County to launch new bus service in 2008FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

December 11, 2007

 

CONTACT: Tim Swope, Boulder County Alternative Transportation Coordinator, 720-564-2658

 

County to launch new bus service in 2008

New routes connect East County to jobs, schools, hospital, US36 transit

 

Residents in east Boulder County will gain a brand new bus route and expanded service on an existing route in 2008, making it easier for them to access work, school, medical care and shopping.

 

The Boulder County Commissioners have approved the use of funds from the County’s Transportation Sales Tax to partner with RTD in providing two new bus services in Louisville, Lafayette and Erie. The first will extend the seven-year-old JUMP service to East County Line Road in Erie. The second will launch a new “LYNX” service connecting downtown Louisville and west Louisville neighborhoods to the US36 Corridor.

 

The JUMP currently travels though Boulder every 10 minutes, with service to the Lafayette park-n-Ride every 20 minutes. The proposed extension would travel through Lafayette along Arapahoe Road and Baseline Road, then head north through the Boulder County sections of Erie to the currently planned terminus at the Erie Town Community Center at the intersection of East County Line Road and Leon Wurl Parkway.

 

“Growth in Erie and Lafayette, along with continued in-commuting from areas east of Boulder County, warrant an extension of this bus service. Both RTD and Boulder County have long sought a more direct transit service to Erie, and folks in Erie have been encouraging us to start the service as soon as possible,” said Boulder County Commissioner Will Toor. “This service will carry out the commitment we made to county voters when they supported the countywide transportation sales tax.”

 

The new LYNX bus will offer transit service from the Louisville Library (in downtown Louisville) south to Monarch High School, Avista Hospital, the Flatirons Crossing park-n-Ride and the Broomfield park-n-Ride.

 

The services are scheduled to start this summer. Both services will be funded through a combination of Federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality grants and revenue from the Boulder County Transportation sales tax, which county residents approved in 2001. During the 2007 election, County voters approved an extension of the sales tax, beginning in 2009.

 

Details of the LYNX and JUMP services and the County’s agreements with RTD have not yet been finalized. “We still have to work out the details with RTD, our local partners, and the Regional funding agencies about how this is going to work,” Transportation Director George Gerstle explained. “Originally we had wanted to launch this service sooner, but we are very excited that this most recent proposal offers residents a better service at a lower long-term cost to both the County and RTD.” 

 

-END-

 

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=991Tue, 11 Dec 2007 10:00:00
Public invited to provide comments on proposed Sustainability Element, County Comp Plan - Wed., May 16 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 14, 2007

 

Contact: Michelle Krezek, Boulder County Land Use Department (720) 564-2623

 

Public invited to provide comments on proposed Sustainability Element for County Comp Plan

 

The Boulder County Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing for the evening of Wednesday, May 16, to take public testimony on adopting a new Sustainability Element for the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan.

 

The hearing will take place:

 

When:     May 16, 2007, 7:00 p.m.

Where:    3rd Floor Hearing Room, Boulder County Courthouse, 1325 Pearl Street, Boulder

 

As proposed, the new Sustainability Element will help create a framework of sustainable policies and practices for future land use in unincorporated Boulder County. The element gives broad, inclusive goals to help guide future regulations while also providing specific direction on policies such as an expanded transfer of development rights program, structure size, and green building.

 

The Planning Commission will take public testimony at Wednesday night's hearing and it is anticipated that they will then take action to adopt the Goals and Policies making them a part of the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan. Once the Element is adopted, the County Land Use Department will begin work on programs to implement these goals and policies.

 

For additional information, please contact Michelle Krezek at mkrezek@co.boulder.co.us or 720.564.2623. A copy of the draft goals and policies of the Sustainability Element can be found at: www.co.boulder.co.us/lu.

 

-END-

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=812Mon, 14 May 2007 10:00:00
Boulder County Land Use Director sworn in as President of American Institute of Certified Planners

Contact:  Barb Halpin, Boulder County Public Information Officer, 303-441-1622

 

Philadelphia, Pa - Boulder County Land Use Department Director Graham Billingsley officially took office today as president of the American Planning Association’s (APA) professional institute, the American Institute of Certified Planners. The swearing in ceremony was conducted as part of APA’s National Planning Conference in Philadelphia.

 

Graham has served as president-elect for the past year and will now serve as president for a two-year term. As president, he is responsible for heading up the American Institute of Certified Planners Commission and guiding certification, accreditation, professional development and ethics within the planning community. The presidency is a voluntary position.

 

Billingsley has served as director of the Boulder County Land Use Department since 1989 and has played a critical role in facilitating an ongoing public process of updating both the County’s Comprehensive Plan and the County’s Land Use Code. As a result of his efforts, other communities often look to Boulder County as an innovative role model for long term, smart growth planning.

 

Graham's 18-year tenure at Boulder County has included the adoption of a site plan review program for all new construction; the adoption of numerous intergovernmental agreements creating urban growth boundaries for all communities in the county; and a transfer of development rights program that has led to the preservation of more than 6,000 acres.

 

Most recently, Billingsley has helped oversee an extensive review and revision process for the existing land use code, a process that is putting sustainable land use policies and practices in the forefront of future planning and development.

 

Billingsley’s career in the planning profession spans more than 30 years of service in public and private sectors in Colorado, Texas, Missouri and Ohio. He served as president of the APA Colorado chapter for four years (from 2002-06), and has held a number of other offices in professional planning organizations.

 

APA is a 41,000-member organization committed to promoting good planning processes. The professional institute, which constitutes 16,000 of those members, certifies planners and focuses on ethics, professional development and standards of professional practice. For more information about APA, please visit: www.planning.org.

 

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http://www.bouldercounty.org/apps/newsroom/templates/?z=0&a=789Tue, 17 Apr 2007 10:00:00