Debris Cleanup

Additional information about debris removal and cleanup can be found on the main Cleanup page.

If you have a question that is not addressed here, please email your question to floodrecovery@bouldercounty.org.



Community Debris Removal

Is the county still collecting roadside debris?

Countywide roadside debris removal has ended. Roadside debris removal for Spring 2014 will continue only in the hardest hit areas listed below:

  • Longmont Dam Rd
  • Apple Valley Rd
  • Old St Vrain Rd, CR 69 & lower portion of Red Gulch
  • N 83rd St & North County Line Rd near Little Thompson
  • N 75th St between Hygiene and St Vrain Rd
  • Raymond, Riverside, CR 103N
  • Jamestown
  • James Canyon Dr
  • Lefthand Canyon up to Lickskillet
  • All of Gold Run Rd
  • All of Fourmile Canyon Dr, up to Sunset
  • N 41st & Oxford near Lefthand Creek
  • N 49th St between Oxford and Niwot Rd
  • N 63rd St between Oxford and Niwot, Brigadoon Glen and Oriole Estates
  • N 73rd St & Nimbus, near Lefthand Creek
  • N 81st St at Lefthand Creek
There is not have a set end-date for debris pick-up in these areas, as the duration of this program will depend on the weather, how much debris residents continue to bring to the road and how fast the debris-removal crews can work. However, residents are encouraged to bring debris to the road as soon as possible.

Any residents outside of these areas are responsible for their own debris disposal. 

Who is responsible for the cleanup of debris from upstream properties that is now on my private property?

Debris cleanup is the responsibility of the property owner where the debris was deposited. Upstream properties are not responsible for cleaning up debris that moved off their property. To assist property owners in getting debris off their properties, Boulder County is contracting with a removal company to begin roadside pickup of flood debris in the mountain communities. We are asking residents to follow specific guidelines in order to help this project progress as efficiently as possible. We hope this service greatly helps you as you work to clean up debris deposited on your land.

How will Boulder County Parks and Open Space prioritize the removal of flood debris from their land?

The flood had an enormous impact on large areas of Boulder County Parks and Open Space (BCPOS) lands. Much of this impact is sand, rock and woody debris moved and deposited in the floodplains throughout the county.

BCPOS staff, with consultation from Colorado State University stream scientists, have determined that much of the natural debris generated by floods is beneficial to water quality, water dynamics, and aquatic and associated terrestrial wildlife of waterways. It is a natural component of stream development. The staff also understands that some debris from floods can have a damaging impact on human lives and infrastructure, including ditch systems. Which means that BCPOS will remove debris that is not natural, is a threat to infrastructure and that may be hazardous to public health and/or the environment. We will not remove vegetative debris, or sand and rock debris from affected unimproved county land that does not present an imminent threat to public or private infrastructures, or improved property.

What resources are available to assist me if the size, magnitude or location of debris is beyond my physical or financial capacity to deal with?

At this time Boulder County is working with FEMA, Natural Resource Conservation Services (NRCS), the Army Corps of Engineers and other entities to determine if public assistance will be available to help with direct debris removal from private land. If assistance becomes available, the county will focus these limited resources to the removal of debris that has been determined to be the most imminent threat to public health and safety and/or public and private infrastructure.

Because it is uncertain that public funding will be available to assist in removing debris from private property and because it would be limited to instances in which debris represents an imminent threat to health and safety or improved property, we encourage you to work with volunteer organizations to help move debris to your roadside. Many volunteer groups have equipment, chainsaws and manpower to help meet your needs. To find volunteer organizations working in your area, either contact your local community leaders, or contact Amy Hardy at Foothills United Way, at AHardy@unitedwayfoothills.org or call 2-1-1 for additional volunteer resources.

If you have a debris dam that outstrips your abilities to remove it and is also an imminent threat to public or private infrastructure please fill out our online Flood Debris Reporting Form to let us know about your situation. You can also contact us, at debrisresponseteam@bouldercounty.org or 720-564-2222.

Who is responsible for the cleanup if there is debris in or adjacent to the waterway?

Each individual property owner is responsible for cleaning up debris on their property. Boulder County is working with FEMA, NRCS and the Army Corps of Engineers to assess where debris that represents an imminent threat to human health and safety and/or to public or private infrastructure is located in the county. Boulder County will address as many of these locations as it can afford, but cannot address any areas that are not deemed to be an imminent threat to human health and safety and/or to public or private infrastructure.

What can I do to protect myself from further damage from debris that is not my responsibility? I am worried that my neighbor is not going to return to their property until after the winter, yet they have cleanup that is needed before the spring runoff starts.

If possible please help us by trying to contact your neighbor and letting them know about our Mountain Community Debris Removal Plan. Please also let them know that many volunteer organizations are in the area and can help move debris to the roadside. If you have trouble contacting your neighbor please contact us at debrisresponseteam@bouldercounty.org or 720-564-2222.

What do I do if the material I pulled from the stream is still far from the roadside?

We encourage you to work with volunteer organizations to help with your debris removal needs. Many volunteer groups have equipment, chainsaws and manpower to help meet your needs. To find volunteer organizations working in your area either contact your local community leaders, or Amy Hardy at Foothills United Way, at AHardy@unitedwayfoothills.org or call 2-1-1 for additional volunteer resources.

Should I be treating natural materials differently from man-made materials?

Yes, in preparation for roadside pickup of flood debris, please make sure to follow our guidelines we have provided.

My property is located on a State Highway. Will CDOT be helping remove flood debris at curbside?

Yes, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) has contracted with Phillips and Jordan, Inc. to collect debris from flood-impacted state highways. Residents who live on the flooded highways are urged to bring their flood-related debris to just off the pavement next to the highway, where it will be picked up over the next few weeks. Before hauling your debris to curbside please make sure to visit their project information webpage.

Does the recently issued quarantine on Ash trees influence the movement of flood debris?

Residents participating in Boulder County operated curbside flood-debris removal programs do not have to take any special steps to maintain compliance with the quarantine. Debris collected by Boulder County is being treated and transported according to the requirements of the quarantine [www.eabcolorado.com].

If you haul woody flood debris to a disposal site on your own than you must follow the requirements of the quarantine. Specifically, flood debris cannot be transported outside the quarantine boundary without specific authorization from the Commissioner of Agriculture or the United States Department of Agriculture.

Woody flood debris can be hauled to the following locations within the quarantine boundary:

  • Western Disposal Composting Facility, 5880 Butte Mill Road, Boulder
  • Denver Regional Landfill, 1441 Weld County Road 6, Erie
  • Front Range Landfill, 1830 Weld County Rd 5, Erie
  • Republic Landfill, 8900 Colorado 93, Golden

For additional information about the Emerald Ash Borer quarantine, management and identification please visit www.EABColorado.com.

Follow